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Are the dates for the "Legacy" drone transition changing?

rilot

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zocalo

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CAA opened a consultancy a few weeks back on this. IIRC, the options were basically - no delay, delay 1 year, 2 years, or indefinitely, with freeform comments also possible. I think that means that a further delay is a given, with 1st Jan 2024 being the earliest go-live date, and even that seems unlikely IMHO, given one issue seems to be with signing contracts with the testing facilities who will need to actually certify the aircraft.

FWIW, I suggested they simply scrap the whole idea of legacy and let the older devices age out on their own. There's almost no chance that anyone doing a spot check will know whether a given drone is being flown illegally as legacy or legally as non-legacy, so it would only matter in the event of an incident when the details would come to light in an investigation. There are not a massive number of drones out there, and C-mark or not, the latest drones are presumably being built to the current draft standards.

The rhetorical question is how many M2s and earlier does the CAA realistically expect to be flying by 2024, 2025, or whenever the new rules might be in a position to go live. Is that number *really* high enough to justify some kind of special handling that would - in all probability - be all but unenforceable anyway?
 

old man mavic

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as of now the date is still end of 2022 but as @zocalo said in his post above ,it will most likely change before the end of the year
 

Robert Prior

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Sideways question: is there a published definition for "toy"? Wondering about the sub-250g category…
 

old man mavic

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all i could find on the CAA website is it refers to under 250g drones and small home constructed FPV type drones that dont have a camera on board that is capable of recording pictures or video
this does not include the small camera that FPV drones use to send signals to goggles,these type of drone are in the C0 group of the open category
they also present no or very little risk if they hit someone or something,and most of them have enclosed propeller's anyway
there is also reference to the maximum distance from the transmitter that the drone can be controlled by the RC ,
 

Robert Prior

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all i could find on the CAA website is it refers to under 250g drones and small home constructed FPV type drones that dont have a camera on board that is capable of recording pictures or video
this does not include the small camera that FPV drones use to send signals to goggles,these type of drone are in the C0 group of the open category
they also present no or very little risk if they hit someone or something,and most of them have enclosed propeller's anyway
there is also reference to the maximum distance from the transmitter that the drone can be controlled by the RC

So a Mavic Mini isn't a toy?

Curious because my post-retirement hope is to take aerial pictures in Brittany. And my French isn't good enough to pass a exam, even if I know the material. I have my Canadian sRPAS licence.
 

zocalo

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So a Mavic Mini isn't a toy?

Curious because my post-retirement hope is to take aerial pictures in Brittany. And my French isn't good enough to pass a exam, even if I know the material. I have my Canadian sRPAS licence.
While you need to register the aircraft in the first country you intend to fly in, you can do the exam part in any country in the EU. English is still an official language of the EU and is used in the Republic of Ireland, so you can take the exam there, then register the drone in France.

I have no idea why they have this "first country" requirement for registration though, especially given Schengen, since it would seem more sensible to do both in the same place, but that's the EU for you.
 

Robert Prior

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While you need to register the aircraft in the first country you intend to fly in, you can do the exam part in any country in the EU. English is still an official language of the EU and is used in the Republic of Ireland, so you can take the exam there, then register the drone in France.

I have no idea why they have this "first country" requirement for registration though, especially given Schengen, since it would seem more sensible to do both in the same place, but that's the EU for you.
So I'd have to go to Ireland to sit the exam?

Hadn't planned on visiting Ireland. That will up the cost of the trip quite a bit — maybe out of my budget. :(
 

zocalo

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So I'd have to go to Ireland to sit the exam?

Hadn't planned on visiting Ireland. That will up the cost of the trip quite a bit — maybe out of my budget. :(
No need to visit in person, you can do the exam online before you travel using the Republic's MySRS platform - it's then valid for 5 years, which is one of the longer durations before a resit is needed in the EU scheme. You mentioned "sub-250g" above, so I'm assuming you'd only need the basic online Open Subcategory A1 and A3, and not either Subcategory A2 or Specific which have more onerous requirements and I believe does have a practical flying element.

More details here.
 

Robert Prior

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No need to visit in person, you can do the exam online before you travel using the Republic's MySRS platform - it's then valid for 5 years, which is one of the longer durations before a resit is needed in the EU scheme. You mentioned "sub-250g" above, so I'm assuming you'd only need the basic online Open Subcategory A1 and A3, and not either Subcategory A2 or Specific which have more onerous requirements and I believe does have a practical flying element.

More details here.
Thank you very much for this help.

It will likely be a couple of years before I can go, but this is a trip I've wanted to do for years so this is very useful information.
 

obistevekenobi

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No need to visit in person, you can do the exam online before you travel using the Republic's MySRS platform - it's then valid for 5 years, which is one of the longer durations before a resit is needed in the EU scheme. You mentioned "sub-250g" above, so I'm assuming you'd only need the basic online Open Subcategory A1 and A3, and not either Subcategory A2 or Specific which have more onerous requirements and I believe does have a practical flying element.

More details here.

Thanks to covid some of the Irish examiners for the A2 also have online modules, so the practical element does not require an in person visit anymore.
 

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