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Mavic Air / Polar Pro Filters (Sea / Beach / Coast)

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#1
Hi guys, was wondering if anyone can advise what filter was used to get a shot like the below (link)?

I got just got the Vivid Collection Polar Pro filters (4ND/PL / 8ND/PL / 16ND/PL) and wanted to know how to get this detail and similar shots using any of these filters.

https://s24890.pcdn.co/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/DJI-Mavic-Air-Accessories-4-2.jpg

Also, How does can I make the ND/PL filter act only as an ND Filter?

Thanks in advance!
 

Mossiback

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#2
...I got just got the Vivid Collection Polar Pro filters (4ND/PL / 8ND/PL / 16ND/PL) and wanted to know how to get this detail and similar shots using any of these filters.

Also, How does can I make the ND/PL filter act only as an ND Filter?
You don't need ND filters for still pictures unless you are trying to introduce some motion blur, as in moving water (you then have the problem of the Mavic moving during exposure). In most cases you want a fast shutter speed and low ISO setting for sharp and noise-less results. A polarizing filter will help with color saturation and glare reduction but the angle has to be set correctly for maximum effect.

For the Mavic, ND filters are really needed for video to slow down the shutter speed.
 
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#3
Sure looks like a polarizer was used and then shot raw with some good post processing. Note that the sun would have had to be in the right place for the polarizer to work. So either good planning by the photographer or fluke ;)
 
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#4
You don't need ND filters for still pictures unless you are trying to introduce some motion blur, as in moving water (you then have the problem of the Mavic moving during exposure). In most cases you want a fast shutter speed and low ISO setting for sharp and noise-less results. A polarizing filter will help with color saturation and glare reduction but the angle has to be set correctly for maximum effect.

For the Mavic, ND filters are really needed for video to slow down the shutter speed.
Hi Mossiback, many thanks for your quick response.
1) So basically, when you say 'you want a fast shutter speed and low ISO setting for sharp and noise-less results' does this apply for both still pictures and video?

2) Also, apparently ND/PL filter can be “rotated” to act only as ND filter and not worry about sun direction, is that true/possible?

3) When I use the ND/PL filter can I have it on auto settings or the actual point is to be used on Manual with adjusted shutter speed basis selected fps? Do they do anything on auto mode?

Thanks again!
 
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#5
Sure looks like a polarizer was used and then shot raw with some good post processing. Note that the sun would have had to be in the right place for the polarizer to work. So either good planning by the photographer or fluke ;)
Tanks for your response Flyby, haha fluke maybe indeed! Well basically to get a shot like this u need post processing + filter for sure?

Thanks again.
 

Mossiback

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#6
...1) So basically, when you say 'you want a fast shutter speed and low ISO setting for sharp and noise-less results' does this apply for both still pictures and video?

2) Also, apparently ND/PL filter can be “rotated” to act only as ND filter and not worry about sun direction, is that true/possible?

3) When I use the ND/PL filter can I have it on auto settings or the actual point is to be used on Manual with adjusted shutter speed basis selected fps? Do they do anything on auto mode?...
  1. This applies to pictures. The faster the shutter speed and lower the ISO settings make for a sharper picture with less noise. A fast shutter speed in video can make the video appear choppy or stuttering, with the effect more apparent with more motion, as when you pan right or left. With video you need a bit of motion blur for smooth movements.
  2. A polarized filter has to be set at the correct angle to the sun for the full polarizing effect. The base neutral density factor applies regardless of angle. In most videos the sun angle is constantly changing which makes the polarizing effect greater or lesser throughout the video. This makes it harder to edit later.
  3. I have read where it is best to not shoot video in automatic mode because the changing exposure makes it harder to edit clips together.
Personally, I set my ND/PL filter horizontally so it will have the most even effect throughout the shot. It is recommended to use non-polarizing filters for video which is why you can find polarized and non-polarized filters in a set.
 
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#7
To get that water that see through my take is you'd need a polarizer. Or really excellent sun position and no wind. Polarizer is more reliable ;)
 
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Mossiback

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#8
To get that water that see through my take is you'd need a polarizer. Or really excellent sun position and no wind. Polarizer is more reliable ;)
Definitely. A polarizer will cut through the reflections but it must be positioned correctly for the maximum effect.
 
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#10
  1. This applies to pictures. The faster the shutter speed and lower the ISO settings make for a sharper picture with less noise. A fast shutter speed in video can make the video appear choppy or stuttering, with the effect more apparent with more motion, as when you pan right or left. With video you need a bit of motion blur for smooth movements.
  2. A polarized filter has to be set at the correct angle to the sun for the full polarizing effect. The base neutral density factor applies regardless of angle. In most videos the sun angle is constantly changing which makes the polarizing effect greater or lesser throughout the video. This makes it harder to edit later.
  3. I have read where it is best to not shoot video in automatic mode because the changing exposure makes it harder to edit clips together.
Personally, I set my ND/PL filter horizontally so it will have the most even effect throughout the shot. It is recommended to use non-polarizing filters for video which is why you can find polarized and non-polarized filters in a set.
Mossiback, how do you set the ND/PL Filter horizontally? Sorry if this is an idiotic question...

Also, once set like that it can basically be used same for video and Stills?
 
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Mossiback

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#11
Mossiback, how do you set the ND/PL Filter horizontally?...
On a SLR camera the polarizing filter has a mark on it that you basically just rotate until it is pointed toward the sun. When the mark is on the top of the filter the polarizing filter is set horizontally. My MP PolarPro filters had no mark so I had to make my own. While wearing polarized sunglasses, look through your filter and rotate until the most light is blocked out, then mark the filter rim at the 3 or 9 o'clock position. When you mount the filter with the mark on the top or bottom of the camera lens it is mounted with the polarizing effect set horizontal. This is where I set mine if I do not have a particular shot angle worked out ahead of time.
...Also, once set like that it can basically be used same for video and Stills?
It is not recommended to use a polarizing filter for videos unless the camera angle to the sun will not change. The polarizing effect is most noticeable in the sky and over water and if the camera angle to the sun changes then the sky will go from light to dark(er) to light and can make for difficult editing later. It works great for stills but you have to figure your angle to the sun correctly for the best results. To get the best polarizing effect for your shot you place the filter with the mark pointing at the expected angle to the sun.
 
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#12
On a SLR camera the polarizing filter has a mark on it that you basically just rotate until it is pointed toward the sun. When the mark is on the top of the filter the polarizing filter is set horizontally. My MP PolarPro filters had no mark so I had to make my own. While wearing polarized sunglasses, look through your filter and rotate until the most light is blocked out, then mark the filter rim at the 3 or 9 o'clock position. When you mount the filter with the mark on the top or bottom of the camera lens it is mounted with the polarizing effect set horizontal. This is where I set mine if I do not have a particular shot angle worked out ahead of time.

It is not recommended to use a polarizing filter for videos unless the camera angle to the sun will not change. The polarizing effect is most noticeable in the sky and over water and if the camera angle to the sun changes then the sky will go from light to dark(er) to light and can make for difficult editing later. It works great for stills but you have to figure your angle to the sun correctly for the best results. To get the best polarizing effect for your shot you place the filter with the mark pointing at the expected angle to the sun.
Thanks Mossiback, great explanation! So for filming it's recommended to use only ND filters rather than ND/PL? do you have both? This does seem a bit confusing, should I then maybe return the PolarPro Vivid collection and get the simple ND collection? Also on the aerial beach pic I initially posted you guys were sure it was with an ND/PL filter, that 'see through' water effect cannot be achieved only with an ND filter? or no filter?

Thanks again, new to all this so really appreciate your guys time and patience! Cheers!
 

Mossiback

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#13
...So for filming it's recommended to use only ND filters rather than ND/PL? do you have both? This does seem a bit confusing, should I then maybe return the PolarPro Vivid collection and get the simple ND collection?...
I may not be the best source of information on this, since I do not record professionally, but I do have a lot of SLR/polarizing filter experience. If you are trying to produce a commercial quality video then it is best to use non-polarizing filters if your sun angle will change. I only have ND/PL filters and mount them horizontally unless I have a particular shot in mind.
...Also on the aerial beach pic I initially posted you guys were sure it was with an ND/PL filter, that 'see through' water effect cannot be achieved only with an ND filter? or no filter?
Since there is absolutely no reflection on the water, it is assumed that a polarizing filter was used. Given that the shot was straight down and the sun was at a low angle the reflections are minimum but there would still be some reflection of the sky without a polarizer to cut them out.
 
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