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3 When you can't use a drone a regular camera works just fine!

Chrislaf

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I had the opportunity to go camping with my family in May in two beautiful Provincial parks we have been to many times - Awenda and Algonquin. Since they are Provincial parks no drone flying of any kind is allowed, even sub 250g drones. There are many beautiful areas within both parks where you could get great photos from a drone but I understand why these laws are in place and instead used my DSLR. We had a relaxing time in both parks.

The first image is taken at Awenda Provincial Park near Penetanguishene, ON which is about a 40 minute drive from where I live. The second image is of Costello Creek in Algonquin Provincial Park - Ontario's oldest and one of Canada's largest Provincial parks. It is about a 2 hour drive north from where I live. Both images are composite images combined in post from a series of long exposure shots.

View attachment Awenda_Trails.jpg
The rock in the centre of the frame is being lit by the moon which was about 75% full.


View attachment Costello Creek.jpg
This image capture was started during blue hour and the majority of the capture was done at this time so that is why the image has a blue tint. The yellow streaks along the shoreline are fireflies.

As an avid drone enthusiast who uses my drones for photography I have often wondered about why we are not allowed to fly in Provincial and National Parks. During our stay in Algonquin my wife encountered a person flying a mini drone from the beach and found it irritating. She calmly said they weren't allowed and the person said it was a mini drone but seemed uncomfortable. She left it at that and came back to our site. I can see why, even more now why these laws preventing drones in parks are necessary. When I was out canoeing and kayaking with the family, I would not have wanted the peace and quiet interrupted by the sound of a drone overhead, nor would I want someone flying their drone from the beach as I am there relaxing.

Chris
 
Awesome!
 
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Those are wonderful photos. Looks like you caught an aircraft beacon in the second one.
Thanks.
Yes, but it is not that visible because it is in the trees so didn’t bother taking those images out.

Chris
 
What is the vertical row of white dots that extends upward from the large rock across the pond?
That also appears to be a plane but usually a plane has a red light flashing as well and this one didn't. Maybe it's the Starlink. Here is one of the images that made that row of white dots. I guess I could re-process and remove those images.

Chris

View attachment D750-3154.jpg
 
That also appears to be a plane but usually a plane has a red light flashing as well and this one didn't. Maybe it's the Starlink. Here is one of the images that made that row of white dots. I guess I could re-process and remove those images.

Chris

View attachment 175591
I wouldn't edit them out. They make the merged photo much more interesting. They do look like a train of Starlink Satellites. Maybe there's an enthusiast on the forum who will look at the tracking archive and see if that makes sense.

In any case, the photos are wonderful. The lightning bugs add a lot.
 
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I wouldn't edit them out. They make the merged photo much more interesting. They do look like a train of Starlink Satellites. Maybe there's an enthusiast on the forum who will look at the tracking archive and see if that makes sense.

In any case, the photos are wonderful. The lightning bugs add a lot.
I thought of editing out the fireflies but there yellow colour contrasts with the blue so I left them in.
 
We're headed to a national seashore in August for the meteor shower so I'm backpacking several pounds of camera gear that could be replaced with less than a pound of drone. I mostly agree that drones used carelessly can be annoying, but I do wish the laws weren't quite so absolute.
 
I had the opportunity to go camping with my family in May in two beautiful Provincial parks we have been to many times - Awenda and Algonquin. Since they are Provincial parks no drone flying of any kind is allowed, even sub 250g drones. There are many beautiful areas within both parks where you could get great photos from a drone but I understand why these laws are in place and instead used my DSLR. We had a relaxing time in both parks.

The first image is taken at Awenda Provincial Park near Penetanguishene, ON which is about a 40 minute drive from where I live. The second image is of Costello Creek in Algonquin Provincial Park - Ontario's oldest and one of Canada's largest Provincial parks. It is about a 2 hour drive north from where I live. Both images are composite images combined in post from a series of long exposure shots.

View attachment 175586
The rock in the centre of the frame is being lit by the moon which was about 75% full.


View attachment 175587
This image capture was started during blue hour and the majority of the capture was done at this time so that is why the image has a blue tint. The yellow streaks along the shoreline are fireflies.

As an avid drone enthusiast who uses my drones for photography I have often wondered about why we are not allowed to fly in Provincial and National Parks. During our stay in Algonquin my wife encountered a person flying a mini drone from the beach and found it irritating. She calmly said they weren't allowed and the person said it was a mini drone but seemed uncomfortable. She left it at that and came back to our site. I can see why, even more now why these laws preventing drones in parks are necessary. When I was out canoeing and kayaking with the family, I would not have wanted the peace and quiet interrupted by the sound of a drone overhead, nor would I want someone flying their drone from the beach as I am there relaxing.

Chris
Chris:

Both images are great. As you know, I am really into astro photography and in fact, I am taking an astro workshop this August in Moab, Utah. Although I love both images, I would have preferred that you allowed the StarStax program to run a bit longer to get complete circles.

I envy your proximity to those parks!

Dale
 
We're headed to a national seashore in August for the meteor shower so I'm backpacking several pounds of camera gear that could be replaced with less than a pound of drone. I mostly agree that drones used carelessly can be annoying, but I do wish the laws weren't quite so absolute.
I have been fortunate enough to camp in National and Provincial parks all across Canada and there are many beautiful places where getting a drone perspective would be unique. I'd love to be able to fly my drones in some of the places I have visited, but there are so many people who disregard the rules that making a No Drones allowed blanket law with stiff fines seems to be the only deterrent for some people. I do believe that if there were not so many yahoos out there, the laws would be less restrictive as they were not always that way.

I have seen numerous individuals flying sub 250g drones in parks. Here in Canada you don't need a Pilot's licence to fly these drones and many people are probably unaware of the rules for them - they think there are no rules! I think we will see a time soon, in Canada, when there will be more restrictions on sub 250g drones.

From what I understand about the Trust test in the US, maybe that is required in Canada for ownership of any kind of drone.

I love the freedom that the sub 250g drone give us, here in Canada so I am hoping there will be no further restrictions made.

Chris
 
Chris:

Both images are great. As you know, I am really into astro photography and in fact, I am taking an astro workshop this August in Moab, Utah. Although I love both images, I would have preferred that you allowed the StarStax program to run a bit longer to get complete circles.

I envy your proximity to those parks!

Dale
Thanks Dale,

I didn't use StarStax and rarely use it anymore for star trails. I will use it sometimes to make a Timelapse from the trails. I used Photoshop to create the trails as I find it quick and easier to use as I don't have to convert my RAW images to JPEGs to import into StarStax - less steps!

With regard to the complete circles, if I understand you correctly, you thought I should have let my camera run a bit longer so that the trails formed a complete circle around the North Star. In the Awenda photo, I was by myself in an isolated area and I was getting cold so that is why I ended that shot maybe sooner than I would have liked to. In the Algonquin shot I was out with my son (who works in Algonquin Park) and some of his colleagues. They get up early in the morning and have long days so they wanted to get back. That shot was taken in an even more isolated and remote location with no cell service. In both cases, I was camping in a campground so arriving back to my trailer late at night is a factor for me as I do not want to disturb other campers who usually are asleep at that time.

We are fortunate here in Ontario to have some beautiful well managed Provincial Parks. I have camped in many of them and Algonquin is one of the most beautiful parks. In the fall, the road that goes through the park and the parking areas along it are usually packed full of visitors from all over who come to see the fall colours.

You should be able to get some spectacular star shots in Moab as well as some beautiful landscape shots. It's on my bucket list of places in the US to visit.

Chris
 
Thanks Dale,

I didn't use StarStax and rarely use it anymore for star trails. I will use it sometimes to make a Timelapse from the trails. I used Photoshop to create the trails as I find it quick and easier to use as I don't have to convert my RAW images to JPEGs to import into StarStax - less steps!

With regard to the complete circles, if I understand you correctly, you thought I should have let my camera run a bit longer so that the trails formed a complete circle around the North Star. In the Awenda photo, I was by myself in an isolated area and I was getting cold so that is why I ended that shot maybe sooner than I would have liked to. In the Algonquin shot I was out with my son (who works in Algonquin Park) and some of his colleagues. They get up early in the morning and have long days so they wanted to get back. That shot was taken in an even more isolated and remote location with no cell service. In both cases, I was camping in a campground so arriving back to my trailer late at night is a factor for me as I do not want to disturb other campers who usually are asleep at that time.

We are fortunate here in Ontario to have some beautiful well managed Provincial Parks. I have camped in many of them and Algonquin is one of the most beautiful parks. In the fall, the road that goes through the park and the parking areas along it are usually packed full of visitors from all over who come to see the fall colours.

You should be able to get some spectacular star shots in Moab as well as some beautiful landscape shots. It's on my bucket list of places in the US to visit.

Chris
I hear you loud and clear! One of my best astro images (Milky Way timelapse) was the result of a similar painful experience. Being out on a mountain top at 1 or 2 AM in Big Sky,Montana, with my wife back in the condo scared to death for me, calling every 15 minutes on the cell phone) , and a possibility of bears in the area, all contributed to my hurrying up my shot. Reluctantly, I had to shut it down, after 3 hours (started at 10PM) even though I really wanted another 48 images ( 2 more seconds of video at 24 fps). Each image was a 15 second exposure at full aperture (f/2.8) , so it was averaging out to be about 3 shots a minute, meaning staying out in the cold, dark, scary place for another 48/3= 16 minutes more. Plus, I needed 10 or 12 dark images (lens cap). Besides, it was cold.

Astro photography is not for sissies. And it definitely should be done solo.
If you want, I can send details about these workshops. Click here

www.christinekenyon.com

Dale
 
I hear you loud and clear! One of my best astro images (Milky Way timelapse) was the result of a similar painful experience. Being out on a mountain top at 1 or 2 AM in Big Sky,Montana, with my wife back in the condo scared to death for me, calling every 15 minutes on the cell phone) , and a possibility of bears in the area, all contributed to my hurrying up my shot. Reluctantly, I had to shut it down, after 3 hours (started at 10PM) even though I really wanted another 48 images ( 2 more seconds of video at 24 fps). Each image was a 15 second exposure at full aperture (f/2.8) , so it was averaging out to be about 3 shots a minute, meaning staying out in the cold, dark, scary place for another 48/3= 16 minutes more. Plus, I needed 10 or 12 dark images (lens cap). Besides, it was cold.

Astro photography is not for sissies. And it definitely should be done solo.
If you want, I can send details about these workshops. Click here

www.christinekenyon.com

Dale
Thanks for the link. She definitely has some beautiful shots and is a talented photographer. I don't have any 'big' trips planned in the near future, just some more camping in our Provincial Parks. If have info that you think I might be interested in send me a PM and I'll take a look.

Chris
 
Thanks for the link. She definitely has some beautiful shots and is a talented photographer. I don't have any 'big' trips planned in the near future, just some more camping in our Provincial Parks. If have info that you think I might be interested in send me a PM and I'll take a look.

Chris
I'm doing the Arches Canyonland trip in August.
 
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