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Bird Strike

noosaguy

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Went out to a local parkland today to practice a couple of things, one being timelapse, and out of the blue (literally) I bird dived onto my M2P. I immediately paused it and cancelled the timelapse and reduced altitude hoping to bring it home with both drone and bird unscathed. No sooner that I started to bring the drone back the bird struck again. This happened 3 times and the third time i heard what I'm sure was the props brushing the bird. i stopped the drone and the bird flew into a nearby tree. But when I began moving again it attacked once more. Persistent little bugger if nothing else. I have no idea what variety of bird it was but it's spring here so I assume it is nesting nearby. Is this a common occurrence? I wondered about it from the day I got it and now my wondering wan answered. I'd hate to have injured the thing when all it was trying to do (I think) was protect it's nest.
 
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Yes some birds get very defensive around nest sites in the season, but the greater worry is raptors, who can take your craft down in a single strike and for no more reason than that you were in its territory. Agree with above - hard rise and pull back towards you in a demonstration of power. Also skinning the craft red or orange can deter them, or at least that applies to British birds; not sure about those in Australia...
 
I'm sure I was, so climbing is better?
Yes, for two reasons:

1: Birds don't generally expect prey to climb, it shows dominance and can force them to back off.
2: A drone in sport mode will generally out climb any raptor or angry magpie if they continue to hunt the drone.

You can alternate climbing / diving while making your way home for a final dive to landing to usually escape most crazed avians :p
 
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This adds a new dimension to piloting. Thinking about it now, I'm almost certain it was a magpie. I used to be a cyclist and every year at this time I'd get dive-bombed. :confused:
 
Your climbing rate is also significantly faster than you descent, so climbing is really the best option.
 
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This is one reason I do not have my sUAV limited to 400' ( in the US that is a soft limit) because you are LEGALLY allowed to exceed the 400' in order to avoid a collision or otherwise keep the aircraft safe. I don't advocate high flights... too many things can go wrong such as someone like me approaching at 130 Knts in a Cessna 172, but if you were at 300' and a bird came at your sUAV, you do want the option of climbing without a forced stop in mid climb.
 
I was flying this afternoon and my drone was attacked by a magpie too. From what I could see, they attack from above, swopping above the drone. If you timed your ascend incorrectly, you might actually collide with the bird. I don't think the bird that attacked my drone touched it, but it snaps its beak when it's really close to it.
It seemed to ignore my drone when I was flying 2m above the ground. Only when it's over 20m then start it starts to attack.
Crossing that spot from my list of place to fly I guess.
 
I think the poor bird had a nest there and she must have laid eggs. She must consider this new flying thing as a threat and she must be protecting her territory.
 
The other day I was flying around my house and a bird attacked me two times, I too believe there was a nest nearby, my instinct (since I was only 15 feet off the street) was to throttle down fast... I didn't know climbing was a better option
 
The other day I was flying around my house and a bird attacked me two times, I too believe there was a nest nearby, my instinct (since I was only 15 feet off the street) was to throttle down fast... I didn't know climbing was a better option

Are you in Australia? Unfortunately it's that time of year.
 
Yes some birds get very defensive around nest sites in the season, but the greater worry is raptors, who can take your craft down in a single strike and for no more reason than that you were in its territory. Agree with above - hard rise and pull back towards you in a demonstration of power. Also skinning the craft red or orange can deter them, or at least that applies to British birds; not sure about those in Australia...

I once knew this British bird...
 
Went out to a local parkland today to practice a couple of things, one being timelapse, and out of the blue (literally) I bird dived onto my M2P. I immediately paused it and cancelled the timelapse and reduced altitude hoping to bring it home with both drone and bird unscathed. No sooner that I started to bring the drone back the bird struck again. This happened 3 times and the third time i heard what I'm sure was the props brushing the bird. i stopped the drone and the bird flew into a nearby tree. But when I began moving again it attacked once more. Persistent little bugger if nothing else. I have no idea what variety of bird it was but it's spring here so I assume it is nesting nearby. Is this a common occurrence? I wondered about it from the day I got it and now my wondering wan answered. I'd hate to have injured the thing when all it was trying to do (I think) was protect it's nest.
I like the fact you took immediate action to avoid endangerment to the wildlife. Kudos to you. I too have had Falcons do a death circle and thus I immediately landed and said (to the falcon) have a nice day!
 
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