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COVID-19 Questions

  • Thread starter Deleted member 94047
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Deleted member 94047

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Hello all;

As we bunker down to beat this pandemic, I find myself contemplating some questions the answers to which I can't find easily. Admittedly, some of these questions may be really dumb but I am not ashamed to ask them nor would I be offended to be told that they are dumb but I would appreciate an accompanying explanation as to why.

1. How many virus particles (of COVID-19) does it take for you to get infected? One, two, a hundred?

2. If you eat food that has been handled by someone contagious, will chewing it real good destroy the virus while it is still in your mouth?

3. Can you pick the virus on your trousers (pants for you Americans)? Think about it, you seat in a lot of places; your bum may be the second part of your anatomy that has the most contact with outside surfaces (next to your hands of course). So you come in to your house, take off your shoes, wash your hands, and seat on your couch. Later, you touch your couch with your hand and then rub your nose or whatever. Does that mean that you have now picked up the virus from your couch and introduced it to your nose? Is it advisable to remove whatever clothes you had on and change into something else every time you come in to your house after having been outside or is this simply being paranoid?

What say you? I would appreciate any answers! Or if not answers, what questions do you find asking yourself about this virus and the disease it causes. More questions are also welcome and no, there are no dumb questions.

Wish you all well!
 

old man mavic

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Hello all;

As we bunker down to beat this pandemic, I find myself contemplating some questions the answers to which I can't find easily. Admittedly, some of these questions may be really dumb but I am not ashamed to ask them nor would I be offended to be told that they are dumb but I would appreciate an accompanying explanation as to why.

1. How many virus particles (of COVID-19) does it take for you to get infected? One, two, a hundred?

2. If you eat food that has been handled by someone contagious, will chewing it real good destroy the virus while it is still in your mouth?

3. Can you pick the virus on your trousers (pants for you Americans)? Think about it, you seat in a lot of places; your bum may be the second part of your anatomy that has the most contact with outside surfaces (next to your hands of course). So you come in to your house, take off your shoes, wash your hands, and seat on your couch. Later, you touch your couch with your hand and then rub your nose or whatever. Does that mean that you have now picked up the virus from your couch and introduced it to your nose? Is it advisable to remove whatever clothes you had on and change into something else every time you come in to your house after having been outside or is this simply being paranoid?

What say you? I would appreciate any answers! Or if not answers, what questions do you find asking yourself about this virus and the disease it causes. More questions are also welcome and no, there are no dumb questions.

Wish you all well!
hi fellow flyer the virus it would seem is spread by someone close by you coughing or sneezing and then you inhale it
also if it gets on your hands then you can transfer it to you mouth and lungs
the main point is that it has to get into your lungs so unless you actually put an item of clothing in your mouth or transfer it from your hands it cant infect you
avoid contact with others as much as possible stay indoors and stay safe and god willing avoid getting the virus
 

dirkclod

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Watch this video,is long but you will get the idea.
 

zocalo

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1) Impossible to say. It requires *one* virus to successfully infect a cell and replicate to start an infection, but the number of viruses that need to get into a body for that to happen will very from person to person - any number greater than zero would be sufficient.

2) No. Viruses are *tiny*, there's is every chance that a live virus would survive intact through any kind of physical process like this. You need to attact the virus on a cellular level to neutralise it; that means heat, UV light, or biological/chemical agents that can disrupt the structure of the virus.

3) Yes. Current evidence seems to suggest that it can survive on surfaces for up to a week, and possibly two. This is why there is so much emphasis on avoiding contact with your face where most of the soft membranes are located/accessed and washing your hands often to keep them clean. You should generally be treating *all* surfaces as potentially contaminated.

Note also that a virus can enter the body through any soft membrane. That includes eyes, nasal linings, mouth and throat, and skin wounds. A nose & mouth mask will *not* provide 100% protection, no matter what grade it is, if you are not also protecting your eyes.

That said, it's important to maintain some perspective. Statistically, the odds of getting a serious case, let alone a life-threatening one are quite low - especially if you adhere to the published guidelines, sourced directly from a reputable source (government or recognised health authority) in your country. If you can go beyond that, then that's up to you, but keep in mind that if you are using a N95 mask "just because" then that is one less mask available for someone that is really on the front lines of the fight - someone you might need to be healthy if you do get infected. Obviously if you are in a high risk group, or caring for someone that is, then you should be taking a few additional measures to protect yourself if possible, but I really do think it's very important that we all maintain some perspective and ensure that what resources we have are deployed to those that *really* need them first.
 

15PSI

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Zocalo - Your thoughts on utilizing the masks are well taken. When this first hit the news at the beginning of January, contrary to what our 'government' was telling us (just a flu, it will be gone by this weekend, etc...), my wife and I purchased a box of ten n95 masks. Those masks are now at our local hospital.
 

gnirtS

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1. How many virus particles (of COVID-19) does it take for you to get infected? One, two, a hundred?
Depends on the persons physiology, their physical make up, how degraded the virons are, where they infect and everything else.
There is no answer other than the more there are the higher the chances.

2. If you eat food that has been handled by someone contagious, will chewing it real good destroy the virus while it is still in your mouth?
Saliva (and certainly stomach acid) should deactivate it. However, not all food gets eaten. Some ends up on teeth, face/hands and so on.

3. Can you pick the virus on your trousers (pants for you Americans)? Think about it, you seat in a lot of places; your bum may be the second part of your anatomy that has the most contact with outside surfaces (next to your hands of course). So you come in to your house, take off your shoes, wash your hands, and seat on your couch. Later, you touch your couch with your hand and then rub your nose or whatever. Does that mean that you have now picked up the virus from your couch and introduced it to your nose? Is it advisable to remove whatever clothes you had on and change into something else every time you come in to your house after having been outside or is this simply being paranoid?
Yep. It'll live for 1-3 days depending on surface so thats why washing clothes is needed on top of other things.
Its also why facemasks (and cloth masks in particular) are a really bad idea outside a clinical environment where they're not changed regularly and the user has no training how to properly utilise one. They can actually increase the risk of various infections by trapping particles and moisture and keeping it next to the user ready to be breathed in or wiped onto the face.


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Deleted member 94047

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Zocalo, gnirtS - thank you both for your excellent answers!