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Drone registration international use

Davros007

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Hi All,
So, my mavic Pro (1) is registered in Australia as for the heck of it I registered for commercial use. No permit is needed here for non-commercial use.
On registering here the CASA website states that the drone cannot be registered in another country. On traveling to USA, what do I need to do to fly the drone?
I have my EU flight permit but that is not linked to a particular drone (non-commercial use there).
If you travel to Australia and want to use a drone commercially that is registered for commercial use overseas, you can’t register the actual drone here (and you don’t need any “drone license”) but you must get a temporary permit to use your internationally registered drone (for commercial use) whilst here.
What happens in the US? Canada? Now that my drone is registered in Australia for commercial use, I am not allowed to register the airframe overseas. Anyone know the process to fly in US using a drone registered in another country?
 
I know it's not the answer you are looking for. I really don't know what you can do? When all else fails, buy a mavic mini 3 pro.
 
Hi All,
So, my mavic Pro (1) is registered in Australia as for the heck of it I registered for commercial use. No permit is needed here for non-commercial use.
On registering here the CASA website states that the drone cannot be registered in another country. On traveling to USA, what do I need to do to fly the drone?
I have my EU flight permit but that is not linked to a particular drone (non-commercial use there).
If you travel to Australia and want to use a drone commercially that is registered for commercial use overseas, you can’t register the actual drone here (and you don’t need any “drone license”) but you must get a temporary permit to use your internationally registered drone (for commercial use) whilst here.
What happens in the US? Canada? Now that my drone is registered in Australia for commercial use, I am not allowed to register the airframe overseas. Anyone know the process to fly in US using a drone registered in another country?
If you are flying recreationally, you'll need to take the Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) for Recreational Flyers of Drones. It's quick and free and you can get more information at https://www.faa.gov/uas/recreational_flyers/knowledge_test_updates
 
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I believe you would need your Part 107 to fly professionally or a Part 107 pilot standing next to you. @Vic Moss would know the answer for certain.
Thanks. And for this I wouldn’t need to register my drone? As it can’t be, being it’s already registered overseas (like a plane or boat is only registered in one country). So I’m wondering about how I go about temporarily getting a permit for the drone “to fly in American (or Canadian) airspace”.
 
Thanks. And for this I wouldn’t need to register my drone? As it can’t be, being it’s already registered overseas (like a plane or boat is only registered in one country). So I’m wondering about how I go about temporarily getting a permit for the drone “to fly in American (or Canadian) airspace”.
For the US, it's $5 on the FAA Drone Zone website to register. If you are registering as a recreational aircraft, the number is for all of your drones, if commercial registration, then you would need a number for each aircraft. Don't forget the RID requirement in the US starting in September. Your Mavic Pro would need to broadcast RID or an external module that broadcasts RID. You would need a RID serial number for a Part 107 registration.
 
For the US, it's $5 on the FAA Drone Zone website to register. If you are registering as a recreational aircraft, the number is for all of your drones, if commercial registration, then you would need a number for each aircraft. Don't forget the RID requirement in the US starting in September. Your Mavic Pro would need to broadcast RID or an external module that broadcasts RID. You would need a RID serial number for a Part 107 registration.
So, to define my question more: my understanding is that if a drone is registered in one country, it’s shouldn’t be registered in another. Like, you don’t register an aircraft in multiple countries. So. My drone is registered in Australia for commercial use. How do I get a permit to use it in the US temporarily as “an Australian drone entering US airspace” (if you bring a US registered drone to Australia for commercial use, you cannot register it here: you must apply for a temporary permit. How do I do the reverse to use an Australian registered drone in the US?).

Half way down this page, on traveling with a drone into Australia, for other than recreational use:
 

Try asking the question at this support page. They should be able to answer your question. As I understand it, your registration is usually only good in your home country, not internationally.
 
So, to define my question more: my understanding is that if a drone is registered in one country, it’s shouldn’t be registered in another. Like, you don’t register an aircraft in multiple countries. So. My drone is registered in Australia for commercial use. How do I get a permit to use it in the US temporarily as “an Australian drone entering US airspace” (if you bring a US registered drone to Australia for commercial use, you cannot register it here: you must apply for a temporary permit. How do I do the reverse to use an Australian registered drone in the US?).

Half way down this page, on traveling with a drone into Australia, for other than recreational use:
The FAA has a reference page for this: https://www.faa.gov/uas/resources/foreign_operators. You do not need to register your drone, but the FAA does not recognize any foreign remote pilot certificate.
 
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But what if I want to fly for profit in USA (or Canada?).
For a foreign operator to fly their drone (250g-25kg or more than 25kg) in Canada, see this page:
tc.canada.ca/en/aviation/drone-safety/drone-pilot-licensing/get-permission-special-drone-operations/get-permission-fly-drone-foreign-pilot-operator

For sub250g microdrones no permission is required, not even for foreign pilots. Some restrictions do apply to ALL aircraft though, like over forest fire zones, or Class-F restrictions like Niagara Falls, or over the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa. See this page:
tc.canada.ca/en/aviation/drone-safety/learn-rules-you-fly-your-drone/find-your-category-drone-operation

Note: There is no difference whatsoever in the applicability of the Transport Canada regulations with respect to recreational or commercial operations. Whether you fly for fun or business makes no difference. The same rules apply to everyone.

There is no requirement for registration or pilot certification to fly sub250g microdrones whether for business or pleasure, even for foreign pilots.

🇨🇦 "Canada, Land of the Free!" 🇨🇦
 
Last edited:
Hi All,
So, my mavic Pro (1) is registered in Australia as for the heck of it I registered for commercial use. No permit is needed here for non-commercial use.
On registering here the CASA website states that the drone cannot be registered in another country. On traveling to USA, what do I need to do to fly the drone?
I have my EU flight permit but that is not linked to a particular drone (non-commercial use there).
If you travel to Australia and want to use a drone commercially that is registered for commercial use overseas, you can’t register the actual drone here (and you don’t need any “drone license”) but you must get a temporary permit to use your internationally registered drone (for commercial use) whilst here.
What happens in the US? Canada? Now that my drone is registered in Australia for commercial use, I am not allowed to register the airframe overseas. Anyone know the process to fly in US using a drone registered in another country?
It looks like you can de-register a drone in Australia fairly easily - right from the myCASA web portal where you registered it. You can also wait until your registration expires in 12 months and just not renew it.

It does seem odd they won't allow foreign registered drones to be registered there. My Air 2S is registered in both Canada and the UK, and my operator ID from Switzerland is also on it as required under the EASA rules.
 
But what if I want to fly for profit in USA (or Canada?).
In Canada, the reason for your flight makes no difference, all that matters is the class of your drone and where you want to fly it.

For drones 250 g to 25 kg you need to have a sRPAS pilot certificate. If you want to fly in controlled airspace or within 30 m of people you'll need the advanced certificate, otherwise the basic should do you. Both certificates require passing an online multiple-choice exam, the advanced certificate also requires a flight test. Your drone will need to be registered, which is cheap ($5).

However, if you are not a Canadian citizen you'll also need a Special Flight Operations Certificate, which means jumping through hoops and rumour has it they are so backlogged that you probably won't get it.

So your best bet really is to get a sub-250 g drone.
 
In Canada, the reason for your flight makes no difference, all that matters is the class of your drone and where you want to fly it.
Originally, in Canada, "model aircraft" only had to comply with the don't-be-stupid rule. But the definition of model aircraft said for recreational use. Any commercial use required cumbersome applications for a Special Flight Operations Certificate (SFOC).

That all changed on June 1st, 2019, when Transport Canada issued their new Part IX regulations which removed any distinction between recreational or commercial operations. All that matters now is the weight of the UAS (250g-25kg), and where you fly -- Advanced Certificate for controlled airspace, or Basic for uncontrolled.

However, Transport Canada has just recently (June 24th, 2023) published Proposed Rules for comment concerning Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) operations and a heavier class of 25kg-150kg. Within these new rules they've added a bit explicitly addressing commercial operations.

“Specialty air services” means aerial mapping, aerial surveying, aerial photography, forest fire management, fire fighting, aerial advertising, glider towing, parachute jumping, aerial construction, heli-logging, aerial sightseeing, flight training, aerial inspection, and surveillance and aerial spraying services. Non-Canadian operators from countries with whom Canada has a trade agreement in place may obtain authorization to perform specialty air services via an SFOC. Individuals from countries with whom Canada does not have a trade agreement, who are looking to operate commercially, could apply for an exemption to the ownership requirements by contacting Transport Canada Civil Aviation. Non-Canadian operators wishing to fly their drone for recreational purposes would not be subject to the above but would still require an SFOC to operate in Canada.
The new rules are open for a 90-day consultation period (until September 22, 2023 11:59pm EST).
See: Canada Gazette, Part 1, Volume 157, Number 25: Canada Gazette, Part I, Volume 157, Number 25: Regulations Amending the Canadian Aviation Regulations (RPAS – Beyond Visual Line-of-Sight and Other Operations)
 
So, to define my question more: my understanding is that if a drone is registered in one country, it’s shouldn’t be registered in another. Like, you don’t register an aircraft in multiple countries. So. My drone is registered in Australia for commercial use. How do I get a permit to use it in the US temporarily as “an Australian drone entering US airspace” (if you bring a US registered drone to Australia for commercial use, you cannot register it here: you must apply for a temporary permit. How do I do the reverse to use an Australian registered drone in the US?).

Half way down this page, on traveling with a drone into Australia, for other than recreational use:
The process for registering a foreign-registered drone in the US is the same as if a US citizen owned it. The certificate of registration in this case is considered to be a "recognition of ownership" rather than an actual aircraft registration.
 
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The process for registering a foreign-registered drone in the US is the same as if a US citizen owned it. The certificate of registration in this case is considered to be a "recognition of ownership" rather than an actual aircraft registration.
I am just looking into this process now, and there are a lot of steps to follow. It's doable, but complicated. I have family in CT and NC, and friends in FL and elsewhere, and want to bring my drone on my next visit across the border.

So far from what I can tell:

1. The drone needs to be Remote ID compliant, and if it is and it's registered in another country, then the operator needs to file a Notice of Identification in the FAA DroneZone, and obtain a Confirmation that it's accepted. I entered my aircraft info and the Remote ID serial, everything went well and my drone's remote ID is now compliant with US rules.

2. I looked under "Flying your drone for Commercial Purposes" because I don't want to limit myself in case I decide to sell footage later, or take on some type of authorized work. There is a NAFTA (now called USMCA) exemption for Special Air Services, and if the activity falls into one of the specified categories it is covered and no Foreign Aircraft Carrier licence is required. Note that this has nothing to do with work authorizations, or IRS taxes, but it allows the aircraft to be used for commercial purposes in the US. The USMCA rules under 14 CFR Part 375 include industrial and agricultural services such as mapping, surveying, pipeline patrolling, spraying, etc. so conceivably taking photographs/videos would be acceptable.

3. The pilot needs to either have a Part 107 Remote Pilot Certificate, or fly under the supervision of one. I don't think any of my friends or family have one, so now I am looking at testing centres in the US where I could write the 107 test. Erie PA, here I come (eventually!).

Wish me luck! I have a NEXUS, so at least I won't spend too long at the border either way. I suppose I could always just do the TRUST certificate and fly recreationally only, and I may do that test anyway initially.
 
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I am just looking into this process now, and there are a lot of steps to follow. It's doable, but complicated. I have family in CT and NC, and friends in FL and elsewhere, and want to bring my drone on my next visit across the border.

So far from what I can tell:

1. The drone needs to be Remote ID compliant, and if it is and it's registered in another country, then the operator needs to file a Notice of Identification in the FAA DroneZone, and obtain a Confirmation that it's accepted. I entered my aircraft info and the Remote ID serial, everything went well and my drone's remote ID is now compliant with US rules.

2. I looked under "Flying your drone for Commercial Purposes" because I don't want to limit myself in case I decide to sell footage later, or take on some type of authorized work. There is a NAFTA (now called USMCA) exemption for Special Air Services, and if the activity falls into one of the specified categories it is covered and no Foreign Aircraft Carrier licence is required. Note that this has nothing to do with work authorizations, or IRS taxes, but it allows the aircraft to be used for commercial purposes in the US. The USMCA rules under 14 CFR Part 375 include industrial and agricultural services such as mapping, surveying, pipeline patrolling, spraying, etc. so conceivably taking photographs/videos would be acceptable.

3. The pilot needs to either have a Part 107 Remote Pilot Certificate, or fly under the supervision of one. I don't think any of my friends or family have one, so now I am looking at testing centres in the US where I could write the 107 test. Erie PA, here I come (eventually!).

Wish me luck! I have a NEXUS, so at least I won't spend too long at the border either way. I suppose I could always just do the TRUST certificate and fly recreationally only, and I may do that test anyway initially.
Just fly your drone and have a good time now that you can do it legally. IF, and you know nothing for sure, you sell your footage, nobody is coming after you. If you want to make a business on a continual basis, that is another story. Have fun!
 
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