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Filming - tests using frame-rate x shutter speed rule.

marcosvc

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I would like the opinion of colleagues who practice video filming.
I use the double rule to make the image more fluid – Shutter Speed is twice the Frame-rate. I decided to do some tests with the image running sideways, and as a result I found that: Frame-rate 24 and Shutter Speed 50, the result was horrible, very blurry. Even with Frame-rate 25 and Shutter Speed 50 the result is terrible.
Frame-rate 30 and Shutter Speed 60 the result is average
Frame-rate 60 and Shutter Speed 120 the result is good
Frame-rate 60 and Shutter Speed 200 the result was excellent.
In other tests, I came to the conclusion that if you use the Shutter Speed double or higher, you will have a good result, and for my Mavic3 Pro, using higher Shutter Speeds gives better results. I did the test with the normal lens, but with the 3x lens the result is even more visible.
Do you agree with my tests? Has anyone else done this type of test? If you want, I have the videos and I can put them here.
I don't speak native English, so my apologies for the quality of this text.
 
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Your test is accurate. If you pan a camera at a fast rate you will get nothing but a blur and if it's a rolling shutter it will also cause jello. Same as having something pass in front of you at high speed. Also same as turning your head rapidly. The 2X rule is to duplicate those natural conditions. Using a higher frame rate will reduce the blur.
 
There seems to be sn argument that the use of filters is more destructive of natural, fresh colours than any benefit of motion blur which is over rated !
The advice given only use one of two filters for very high light situations 64 or 32 32 being the best compromise? Then dump the rest
 
Thank you for your reply. If so, the 2x rule is not mandatory. I will use higher shutter speed to get better movie results.
Your test is accurate. If you pan a camera at a fast rate you will get nothing but a blur and if it's a rolling shutter it will also cause jello. Same as having something pass in front of you at high speed. Also same as turning your head rapidly. The 2X rule is to duplicate those natural conditions. Using a higher frame rate will reduce the blu
 
My experience in using filters shows that the ND filter, for filming, is necessary because it is not possible to obtain a quality image using, for example, FPS 30 and Shutter speed 60. Even at the lowest ISO and not the lowest aperture, the image is still very clear. Only with the filter is it possible to solve this problem.
There seems to be sn argument that the use of filters is more destructive of natural, fresh colours than any benefit of motion blur which is over rated !
The advice given only use one of two filters for very high light situations 64 or 32 32 being the best compromise? Then dump the rest
 
Thank you for your reply. If so, the 2x rule is not mandatory. I will use higher shutter speed to get better movie results.
I often reference this incidence, Steven Spielberg filmed saving Private Ryan at a shutter angle of 90° or 4x shutter speed to make combat scenes more startling i.e. reduced blur. Some people liked the effect while others found it unnatural. All in the eye of the beholder. The movie made a sit ton of money so it was obviously not too objectionable to most.
 
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If it looks good it is good.

Note that results can be dramatically different with changes in:
Speed
Distance to subject
Yawing (panning) vs. flying
Flying towards/away from subject vs. flying sideways

Testing and finding the looks you like is absolutely the best way to determine settings.
 
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Thank you for your reply. If so, the 2x rule is not mandatory. I will use higher shutter speed to get better movie results.
I almost always ignore the 2x rule as most of my video is landscape oriented. I prefer clear, crisp video at speed.....for instance, flying over crops that nicely aligned.
 
Here are 4 examples of videos as requested:
The files are original without editing.
1st video: 30 FPS 1/60
2nd video: 60 FPS 1/120
3rd video: 60 FPS 1/200
4th video 24 FPS 1/50
the worst: 4th video
the best 3rd video

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Another test
1st video 24 FPS 1/50 zoom 1x (motion blur)
2nd video 60 FPS 1/120 zoom 3x (normal)

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For me, the first 4 videos were not helpful. The quick panning to the left made it hard to see if the videos were better or worse as you stated until you came to a stop near the end. The second 2 were better because you were following the ship.
If you find a setting that works for you then go with that because it's your work.
 
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