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Flying in Whistler, British Columbia is simple. I personally live here and get asked this question all the time. The best answer is to follow this link to make sure of each location you are visiting:
- On the left-hand side, you have a magnifying glass, click it
- Type in Whistler British Columbia (or where ever you want to fly)
- You now have your answer! Simple, click the yellow circles, it mentions you can fly but with CAUTION. Red is a no, no.

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Areas that limit the use of drones
Airports, heliports and aerodromes
An aerodrome is anywhere that an aircraft can take off and land. This includes airports, heliports, and seaplane bases.
Unless you are following an established Transport Canada procedure, you cannot fly closer than:
  • 5.6 kilometres (3 nautical miles) from any airport listed as Certified (“Cert”) in the Canada Flight Supplement
  • 1.9 kilometres (1 nautical mile) from heliports or aerodromes used by helicopters only
There are no distance requirements for operations near all other aerodromes. Operators must maintain a safe distance from other aircraft at all times.
National parks
Drone pilots are not allowed to take-off or land within a national park.
A park superintendent may allow the use of drones in some cases. If you want to fly a drone in a national park, read about the use of drones at Parks Canada places and contact Parks Canada.
Emergency sites
Drone pilots are not allowed to fly within the security perimeter of a police or first responder emergency operation, such as a traffic accident. You must also avoid sites near disasters (forest fires, floods, earthquakes). A drone flying near these areas may interfere with emergency personnel aircraft and the work of emergency personnel.
Advertised events
Drone pilots are not allowed to fly near or over advertised events, such as outdoor concerts and sporting events, unless they have a Special Flight Operations Certificate that specifically allows them to do so.


BEFORE YOU DO THIS: Ask yourself what drone am I flying with? Anything over 250Grams you have to register and get a basic license, super simple.
 

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Jedi5150

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I'm going to have to do some looking into Canadian drone laws in the near future. Myself and some friends will be going to Alberta and BC on a motorcycle ride this summer, and bringing a couple drones along (likely a Mini and a MPro), from the US.
 

CareyL

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I'm going to have to do some looking into Canadian drone laws in the near future. Myself and some friends will be going to Alberta and BC on a motorcycle ride this summer, and bringing a couple drones along (likely a Mini and a MPro), from the US.
Mini - fly responsibly ref: Canadian Aviation Regulations Sec. 900.006. $1,000 fine for infractions
Mavic Pro - above + (all are Canadian Aviation Regulations)abridged summary:
Aircraft must be registered. ref. Sec. 901.02. $1,000 fine
Aircraft must have registration number must be visible on aircraft. ref. Sec. 901.03. $1,000 fine
Must be in Visual Line Of Sight. ref. Sec 901.11. $1,000 fine
Not endanger any person. ref. Sec 901.16. $1,000 fine
Maximum altitude. ref Sec. 901.25 $1,000 fine
Minimum from any other person. ref. Sec. 901.26. $1,000
Not operate from a moving vehicle or vessel. ref. Sec. 901.37. $1,000
Keep a log of all flights. ref. Sec 901.48. $1,000
Keep the logs for between 12 & 24 months. ref. Sec 901.48. Another $1,000
Must hold a valid Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec 901.54 $1,000 & Sec. 901.56. Another $1,000,
Keep a record of Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.56 (2) $1,000
Easily accessible Pilot Certificate Sec. 901.57. $1,000
Operating without Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.63. $1,000
Operating without current, (24 months), Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.65. $1,000; Available. (2). $1,000

It could cost quite a lot to lift that Mavic Pro off the ground. I have left out the obvious distance from airports emergency zones and alcohol consumption. The Pilots license costs $10 and the exam is written online. Registering the Aircraft costs $5.
 
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Jedi5150

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Mini - fly responsibly ref: Canadian Aviation Regulations Sec. 900.006. $1,000 fine for infractions
Mavic Pro - above + (all are Canadian Aviation Regulations)abridged summary:
Aircraft must be registered. ref. Sec. 901.02. $1,000 fine
Aircraft must have registration number must be visible on aircraft. ref. Sec. 901.03. $1,000 fine
Must be in Visual Line Of Sight. ref. Sec 901.11. $1,000 fine
Not endanger any person. ref. Sec 901.16. $1,000 fine
Maximum altitude. ref Sec. 901.25 $1,000 fine
Minimum from any other person. ref. Sec. 901.26. $1,000
Not operate from a moving vehicle or vessel. ref. Sec. 901.37. $1,000
Keep a log of all flights. ref. Sec 901.48. $1,000
Keep the logs for between 12 & 24 months. ref. Sec 901.48. Another $1,000
Must hold a valid Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec 901.54 $1,000 & Sec. 901.56. Another $1,000,
Keep a record of Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.56 (2) $1,000
Easily accessible Pilot Certificate Sec. 901.57. $1,000
Operating without Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.63. $1,000
Operating without current, (24 months), Pilot Certificate. ref. Sec. 901.65. $1,000; Available. (2). $1,000

It could cost quite a lot to lift that Mavic Pro off the ground. I have left out the obvious distance from airports emergency zones and alcohol consumption. The Pilots license costs $10 and the exam is written online. Registering the Aircraft costs $5.

Thanks, I appreciate the info. But these drones will both be registered in the US, and marked appropriately. It's my understanding they do not also need to be registered in Canada, right?
 

CareyL

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Thanks, I appreciate the info. But these drones will both be registered in the US, and marked appropriately. It's my understanding they do not also need to be registered in Canada, right?
Incorrect. I surmised your situation. Something like guns - don't bring them.
 
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Jedi5150

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Incorrect. I surmised your situation. Something like guns - don't bring them.

OK, thanks. But in the case of guns, you're generalizing quite a bit. ;) I'm very up to date on the laws of bringing firearms into Canada as an American, and it's really not all that tough, depending on the type. Many overlanders who do the AlCan and on up to Prudhoe Bay bring along shotguns or rifles for bear protection as they pass through Canada. It can be done legally without much effort. You're correct in regard to handguns. A couple years ago when I rode into BC the female border patrol officer must have asked me about 5 times if I "was sure" I had left my handgun in Washington, once she found out I was an LEO that always carries one. I think she believed I had one stashed somewhere on my bike. :p

Regardless, I can't wait to get back up there! I used to live in Alberta, and I've been gone too long.
 
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CareyL

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OK, thanks. But in the case of guns, you're generalizing quite a bit. ;) I'm very up to date on the laws of bringing firearms into Canada as an American, and it's really not all that tough, depending on the type. Many overlanders who do the AlCan and on up to Prudhoe Bay bring along shotguns or rifles for bear protection as they pass through Canada. It can be done legally without much effort. You're correct in regard to handguns. A couple years ago when I rode into BC the female border patrol officer must have asked me about 5 times if I "was sure" I had left my handgun in Washington, once she found out I was an LEO that always carries one. I think she believed I had one stashed somewhere on my bike. :p

Regardless, I can't wait to get back up there! I used to live in Alberta, and I've been gone too long.
Completely off topic:
Several years ago my wife and I planned another driving trip south. When we got to the US customs they asked, amongst other things, if we had any beef in the van. Foolishly I replied, "only some canned chunky Campbells soup." We were asked to pull to the side for an agriculture inspection. three hours later the inspector showed up and said we would have to throw all our meat products in the garbage.

We said we had change our mind about entering the US. The next day we headed north. We crossed the border towards Skagway - no one asked us about "food Products." We then drove further north to the crossing at milepost 1,221 of the Alaska highway. We waited at a red light for 20 minutes while the border guards peered at us through binoculars. Finally we were waved forward and asked many questions. Not one of them were about food. In fact we might have been arrested on the spot if we weren't carrying food as the next closest gas or food service was more than three hours down the road.

Totally off topic: My wife and I have been on several canoe trips north of 60. The longest was 28 days and ended in the Arctic ocean. We never carried a gun. In fact our experience was that grizzly bears ran away as though the devil was on their tail. Just sayin.
 
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Jedi5150

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Completely off topic:
Several years ago my wife and I planned another driving trip south. When we got to the US customs they asked, amongst other things, if we had any beef in the van. Foolishly I replied, "only some canned chunky Campbells soup." We were asked to pull to the side for an agriculture inspection. three hours later the inspector showed up and said we would have to throw all our meat products in the garbage.

We said we had change our mind about entering the US. The next day we headed north. We crossed the border towards Skagway - no one asked us about "food Products." We then drove further north to the crossing at milepost 1,221 of the Alaska highway. We waited at a red light for 20 minutes while the border guards peered at us through binoculars. Finally we were waved forward and asked many questions. Not one of them were about food. In fact we might have been arrested on the spot if we weren't carrying food as the next closest gas or food service was more than three hours down the road.

Totally off topic: My wife and I have been on several canoe trips north of 60. The longest was 28 days and ended in the Arctic ocean. We never carried a gun. In fact our experience was that grizzly bears ran away as though the devil was on their tail. Just sayin.
Sorry, I shouldn't laugh, but that story about the 3 hour wait over Campbell's chunky soup is hilarious! :p I don't blame you one bit...that would have lost my interest in crossing the border as well. You've got to love the government (and some of its' employees). I'm not at all surprised you had a wildly different experience at the northern border crossing, but I'm a bit surprised about the binocular part.

I'll be the first to admit, I'm not a fan of bears. I don't view them as the majestic animal they are, to me they are simply someone higher on the food chain than me, and that's enough to make me nervous of them. 🤣 If I went the rest of my outdoor life without seeing one, I would not be disappointed. I backpack in the Sierra, and our black bears are much smaller, but I still take along a dog with me when I go. Bears give dogs a wide berth.