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Night vision binoculars?

Why can't you locate the drone by using the map or the orientation chart in the app ? I have flown may times at night and never had any problems in knowing where the drone was.
I don't think that DanielCreed3 meant that he needed them to fly, but just that they could be useful...
 
I am not arguing with you but it really seems odd that I, just an ordinary drone owner, without a commercial 107 can fly at night or any time whereas someone who has passed a test is limited.
Odd but true.
 
Being able to see your drone is only one part of the reason for the line of sight requirement. The other is that you must be able to see what is around your drone - aircraft or other drones- in order to be able to avoid them. Binoculars severely restrict your field of view, making it possible for a dangerous situation to sneak up on you because you were viewing only a limited come of visibility. The FAA wants you to not only see your drone as a speck in the sky, but to be able to determine its orientation so that you can perform evasive maneuvers quickly and efficiently in an emergency.
 
They are not image "magnifiers". They merely amplify the light to allow you to see what was previously invisible. Really no different than wearing eyeglasses.
The FAA will almost certainly say different as they state VLOS must be maintained with no personal visual aid other than standard corrective lenses
 
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They are not image "magnifiers". They merely amplify the light to allow you to see what was previously invisible. Really no different than wearing eyeglasses.

But they are still a single failure point and if you're relying on them while flying and they fail you lose the ability to See & Avoid. This is also why we don't solely rely on the tablet/phone to view the aircraft and rely on flying within VLOS.
 
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Regarding recreational night flying. (If I'm wrong please correct me!) You flight needs to be in Class G airspace, as requested LANCC authorization with automatically be denied past the twilight cut off time.
 
Only two Things fly at night. Bats and twits. Yes you can see your bird if it has lights but your camera..unless NVG can see little or nothing. If you use urban lighting then you are too close
 
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Only two Things fly at night. Bats and twits. Yes you can see your bird if it has lights but your camera..unless NVG can see little or nothing. If you use urban lighting then you are too close
Beg to differ. Just search in photo section and you will see plenty. Just a quick look and found this. Not taken by a bat or twit.

Inspire-Night-Capitol.jpg
 
Only two Things fly at night. Bats and twits. Yes you can see your bird if it has lights but your camera..unless NVG can see little or nothing. If you use urban lighting then you are too close


That's a terribly broad brush you're painting with there.

As already noted, there are some AMAZING Night Photo opportunities for those who are willing to take the time and know what they are doing. A couple of my favorite images I've taken have been taken at night but they were luck and not skill :)
 
Only two Things fly at night. Bats and twits. Yes you can see your bird if it has lights but your camera..unless NVG can see little or nothing. If you use urban lighting then you are too close
Really can't agree with you there at all. Night shots can be very beautiful and dramatic. With long exposure and today's' technology, you can get some really nice shots at night.
 
Odd but true.
As I understand it, the 107 holder is not prohibited from flying at night recreationally. He/she cannot fly at night for commercial purposes. Passing the test does not give you less freedom. And the 107 pilot can request ATC permission to fly at night in, for example, Class D airspace, which I think the recreational flyer cannot. This might have to be done by applying for a "daylight waiver."
 
As I understand it, the 107 holder is not prohibited from flying at night recreationally. He/she cannot fly at night for commercial purposes. Passing the test does not give you less freedom. And the 107 pilot can request ATC permission to fly at night in, for example, Class D airspace, which I think the recreational flyer cannot. This might have to be done by applying for a "daylight waiver."
Correct, a commercial pilot can decide to fly a recreational flight with the applicable recreational rules. So as long as the entire flight is strictly recreational, a commercial pilot can indeed fly at night.

A Part 107 pilot cannot just request permission to fly at night from ATC in controlled airspace , if you are referring to LAANC authorization. Yes, the only way that can happen is to apply for a waiver from the FAA, which is generally neither easy nor quick.
 
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Correct, a commercial pilot can decide to fly a recreational flight with the applicable recreational rules. So as long as the entire flight is strictly recreational, a commercial pilot can indeed fly at night.

A Part 107 pilot cannot just request permission to fly at night from ATC in controlled airspace , if you are referring to LAANC authorization. Yes, the only way that can happen is to apply for a waiver from the FAA, which is generally neither easy nor quick.


And your 107.29 (Daylight Waiver) does not automatically apply to Controlled Airspace. It's noted for Class G airspace only. You'd have to make an additional request and get approval to fly at night in Controlled Airspace and Recreational/Hobbyist don't have that luxury at the moment.
 
And your 107.29 (Daylight Waiver) does not automatically apply to Controlled Airspace. It's noted for Class G airspace only. You'd have to make an additional request and get approval to fly at night in Controlled Airspace and Recreational/Hobbyist don't have that luxury at the moment.
 
I’m sorry gents if I was broad brushing. I am glad that you saw what I was trying to get at. My point is that a recreational pilot cannot fly at night especially using light intensifying goggles. Yes there are some fantastic night shots but taken by professional pilots using high tech cameras long exposures using background ambient lighting and techniques I couldn’t even imagine. With nearly 1000 hrs using NVG ..night goggles they are optimised to work in just over 2 millilux which is pretty dammed dark. So a normal camera would see nothing. If you used the same goggles to see your bird in an urban area they shut down and your bird would be pretty much invisible against an urban lit background.
Will put the brush back in the cupboard and apologise
 
Most of the time i use my Celestron compact binocular but as nv i use this ATN BinoX 4-16x binocular.
This Smart Day/Night Digital Binoculars also has a built-in gyroscope and e-compass which helps to keep images steady and clear while the smart e-compass navigates through pointing to your destination.
 
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