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Whats the best way to handle negative encounters?

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Yes I've had one. Flying Gooseberry badlands in wyoming. Pretty remote, but there was a car in the parking lot. A very hot headed dude came out of the trail area and started yelling at me for wrecking his wilderness experience. I started apologizing profusely and he mellowed out and we had a good conversation for about a half hour. Now when I go there if there is a car in the lot I just wait until they finish their hike then I fly. The flaming dude called me about two weeks later and wanted to be friends and go on a hike... lol. I don't make friends with arsses and said no thanks.

It was my first year of flying and I haven't made that mistake again. Check your surroundings... never know when an ars will appear. De-escalate or get ready to fight. Yes, I had legal right to fly but I don't want to bother proper, not in my nature :)
 
I had a funny encounter with a lady who approached me with the usual rhetoric about no drones allowed in the area, yada, yada. I was polite (yes maam/no maam) and told her I'm certified to fly and have been obtained permission to fly in the area. SHE THEN proceeded to tell me all the nearby areas to get good video/pics and to even come during sunrise to get some fantastic shots. So I guess you never know
Outstanding! We never know when an "Opportunity" is coming our way :)
 
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Have you had any negative encounters?
please share the story so we can learn how to deal with it better

Personally I haven't had any negative encounters (YET) though I've only had a handful of flights so far.
I did have 1 snide comment made while flying at a train station by an old man sitting with his wife at the next table he said
" don't let the camera's catch you doing that "

so I decided to tell him it's fully legal, then I landed the drone, sat with him & explained the rules & how we have to get an operator ID & be registered so it's all legit, we talked for 20 minutes and it ended with him arguing with his wife because he wanted a drone haha! (all in fun)
happy days another person educated, but I know I'll get bored of doing that with people at some point, bored of stopping my flight to explain these things to people who believe they can curtail the enjoyment of my hobby, but I'll always be nice to people I think this Scottish man in the vid has it down to a T.

here's a video of 1 way to handle a negative encounter:

It was good he recorded his interaction as evidence.
 
Only a “why is a drone over my house?” Once. After explaining I’m taking realty photo of your neighbors house and will be done shortly, he said, “oh” and went back inside. I did get Karened with my DSLR on a tripod once. She walked through my composition and started yelling at me for taking her photo. SMH.
 
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Have you had any negative encounters?
please share the story so we can learn how to deal with it better

Personally I haven't had any negative encounters (YET) though I've only had a handful of flights so far.
I did have 1 snide comment made while flying at a train station by an old man sitting with his wife at the next table he said
" don't let the camera's catch you doing that "

so I decided to tell him it's fully legal, then I landed the drone, sat with him & explained the rules & how we have to get an operator ID & be registered so it's all legit, we talked for 20 minutes and it ended with him arguing with his wife because he wanted a drone haha! (all in fun)
happy days another person educated, but I know I'll get bored of doing that with people at some point, bored of stopping my flight to explain these things to people who believe they can curtail the enjoyment of my hobby, but I'll always be nice to people I think this Scottish man in the vid has it down to a T.

here's a video of 1 way to handle a negative encounter:

I printed business cards with my license on the back (home address blurred out). When someone walks up, I hand them the card and tell them I can't talk until I land…"I have to pay close attention to the drone."(FAA rules). The guy in the video was an officer of some sort (ranger). FAA rules say 'any officer of the law has a right to view your license'. The pilot could have been a little more diplomatic. "I'm not near the birds. I understand the law. I'll show you my license as soon as I land." If I was that ranger I would have replied "LAND IT NOW!"
 

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I disagree. Be nice. Explain what you are doing. Tell them you need to pay attention to the drone and you can talk after you land. Give them your card. Don't try to hide. Be bold and out there. You are not doing anything wrong.
I think I am being nice by saying nothing. Nothing they say is going to make me stop. I’m not explaining what I am legally doing to anyone. At most I’ll give them my card as I’m packing up.
 
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I disagree. Be nice. Explain what you are doing. Tell them you need to pay attention to the drone and you can talk after you land. Give them your card. Don't try to hide. Be bold and out there. You are not doing anything wrong.
No thanks. :(
 
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FAA rules say 'any officer of the law has a right to view your license'.
Does it say that?

Or, does it say something like this?

While law enforcement can ask, a UAS or drone pilot IS NOT required by federal regulation to make their UAS FAA Remote Pilot Certificate available*

There's a difference. I can tell you one thing for sure, it's not a right.

What if I don't have a business card and/or "drone" license?

*https://www.faa.gov/sites/faa.gov/f...fety_toolkit/Public_Safety_Drone_Playbook.pdf
 
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Does it say that?

Or, does it say something like this?

While law enforcement can ask, a UAS or drone pilot IS NOT required by federal regulation to make their UAS FAA Remote Pilot Certificate available*

There's a difference. I can tell you one thing for sure, it's not a right.

What if I don't have a business card and/or "drone" license?

*https://www.faa.gov/sites/faa.gov/f...fety_toolkit/Public_Safety_Drone_Playbook.pdf
Thanks for clearing that up. I just remember on the Part 107 test one of the questions (and sample questions) involved showing your license to any law enforcement. The correct answer was: 'Yes, you must show it'. Obviously, FAA wants you to comply, but it's nice to know the real regulation. That is probably why the ranger in the video back off.
 
No thanks. :(
I should have said: Be nice, up to a point. There may be a point where you just have to tell them to "Back Off!" while you are dialing for law enforcement. I just haven't experience that yet. The worst encounter I had was a guy that came out of a church when I was shooting the cross on the steeple. He was loud and concerned. It turns out that they had a daycare and there were children in the yard playing. I didn't even notice them. I explained what I was shooting, gave him my card and offered to send him a photo that I shot. He was satisfied that I wasn't stalking the kids.
 
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Thanks for clearing that up. I just remember on the Part 107 test one of the questions (and sample questions) involved showing your license to any law enforcement. The correct answer was: 'Yes, you must show it'. Obviously, FAA wants you to comply, but it's nice to know the real regulation. That is probably why the ranger in the video back off.
Yes the FAA wants you to comply. The FAA has every right to tell the part 107 pilot who holds an FAA license to present it to law enforcement on demand or request.
 
I should have said: Be nice, up to a point. There may be a point where you just have to tell them to "Back Off!" while you are dialing for law enforcement. I just haven't experience that yet. The worst encounter I had was a guy that came out of a church when I was shooting the cross on the steeple. He was loud and concerned. It turns out that they had a daycare and there were children in the yard playing. I didn't even notice them. I explained what I was shooting, gave him my card and offered to send him a photo that I shot. He was satisfied that I wasn't stalking the kids.
Clearly you need to implement whatever de-escalation tactics works best for the situation. If that works, not a problem. If you were just starting and you could pack up and leave for another day, perhaps that is an option as well. However, I won't be calling law enforcement. Makes no sense to me to call armed government agents who have no knowledge of drone laws to the scene where no crime is being committed, for what? Only as a last resort.
 
I usually try to be pro-active when dealing with the public.. I find that you are going to get 2 different types of people... 1 is annoyed that you are flying, and 1 is in awe of the technology these days... I always try and greet them and casually explain what I am doing like "Great day for a flight over the whatever!"... if I find that they are the ones that are in awe, I explain to them as much as I can about the drone technology, the laws, the licenses, etc... I will usually then let them look at my screen, or my FPV glasses to show them what its like... I usually have about 95% of these encounters... The last 5% that are annoyed, if they start demanding, I start with "I'm sorry, you are who?" Then I usually firmly explain to them the laws and what I am lawfully required to do. I usually don't have much problems with this type around here however...
 
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I usually try to be pro-active when dealing with the public.. I find that you are going to get 2 different types of people... 1 is annoyed that you are flying, and 1 is in awe of the technology these days... I always try and greet them and casually explain what I am doing like "Great day for a flight over the whatever!"... if I find that they are the ones that are in awe, I explain to them as much as I can about the drone technology, the laws, the licenses, etc... I will usually then let them look at my screen, or my FPV glasses to show them what its like... I usually have about 95% of these encounters... The last 5% that are annoyed, if they start demanding, I start with "I'm sorry, you are who?" Then I usually firmly explain to them the laws and what I am lawfully required to do. I usually don't have much problems with this type around here however...
This. As I've said previously, they will probably know nothing about drone flying or the safety features that we take for granted, so a great opportunity to explain these and allay fears.
 
...While law enforcement can ask, a UAS or drone pilot IS NOT required by federal regulation to make their UAS FAA Remote Pilot Certificate available*
...

*https://www.faa.gov/sites/faa.gov/f...fety_toolkit/Public_Safety_Drone_Playbook.pdf
I believe that is outdated and obsolete information. It was updated by congress in the most recent FAA reauthorization.

Here is FAA's updated regulation:
Document Presentation (amended Part 107) – effective April 21, 2021
This rule requires remote pilots to present their remote pilot certificate and photo identification on request from theAdministrator; an authorized representative of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB); any Federal,State, or local law enforcement officer; and any authorized representative of the Transportation SafetyAdministration (TSA). The person operating the drone must have their remote pilot certificate and identification intheir possession and readily accessible when operating.
Find it in the supplement to the playbook @mavic3usa linked:

Find the updated law here in the ECFR for 14 CFR Part 107.7 - the current text:
 
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I believe that is outdated and obsolete information. It was updated by congress in the most recent FAA reauthorization.

Here is FAA's updated regulation:

Find it in the supplement to the playbook @mavic3usa linked:

Find the updated law here in the ECFR for 14 CFR Part 107.7 - the current text:
Sorry you might have missed my follow up post.

I am a recreational pilot

Yes the FAA wants you to comply. The FAA has every right to tell the part 107 pilot who holds an FAA license to present it to law enforcement on demand or request.

The FAA can decide whatever they want with regard to their federal officers and the licensed pilots and it sounds like they are giving new or updated direction to turn over your details when requested. If a FAA officer asked me for my details, I will provide them for sure....he doesn't have to demand them from me.

If a deputy or a trooper or a marshal or a constable or a police officer asks, my reply will be "No thank you." That's the law I obey as I personally see it. This is not legal advice to you or anyone else so if you are not sure, just go ahead and comply is probably the best bet. I should add that if *any* law enforcement officer regardless demands my details, I will likely comply as well.

I just don't want to end up on someone's list for local drone flyers to look out for or so they can later sit around and discuss the situation on how to come up with a summons or whatever.
 
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Sorry you might have missed my follow up post.



The FAA can decide whatever they want with regard to their federal officers and the licensed pilots and it sounds like they are giving new or updated direction to turn over your details when requested. If a FAA officer asked me for my details, I will provide them for sure....he doesn't have to demand them from me.

If a deputy or a trooper or a marshal or a constable or a police officer asks, my reply will be "No thank you." That's the law I obey as I personally see it....
The FAA really can't really decide whatever they want on this issue. It's congress that writes the laws, then FAA develops regulations consistent with those laws.

In this case @mavic3usa selectively quoted FAA published guidance to local law enforcement from 2016, but did not include the FAA's update effective April 21, 2021 that's right alongside the 2016 Law Enforcement Playbook. See links at the bottom of this page.

FAA's regs changed because congress included updated language in H.R. 302 (P.L. 115-254), the FAA Reauthorization Act of 2018.

I guess one can decide to try to out-lawyer local law enforcement. I'd advise against it when the law and regulation so clearly require remote pilots to present their TRUST or Pt. 107 Remote Pilot certificate on demand from FAA, NTSB, TSA, or any federal, state, or local law enforcement officer.

Again, the link for reference. I operate within the legal framework, and advise others to do the same.
 
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The FAA really can't really decide whatever they want on this issue.
Correct. Nobody gets to decided whatever they want.

Here's what the FAA can do:
The FAA can decide whatever they want with regard to their federal officers and the licensed pilots and it sounds like they are giving new or updated direction to turn over your details when requested.

The FAA can decide how they want to advise anyone who is reading the law.

Edit:

I added the following to my post above for clarity. Kinda sucks that people don't follow along the conversation and maybe only read one post but I guess you have to sometimes keeping repeating stuff. Or maybe I missed it and was only thinking it and didn't actually type it or put it in my post:

I am a recreational pilot
 
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