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Class B Airspace

Skydronz

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I live in an area 13 miles from an airport which has a class b airspace rating. Being 13 miles from the airport, the layer of class B airspace starts at 1300 ft. Under that 1300 ft is class E airspace from 700 ft. The FAA told me that I needed to contact ATC for permission to fly my uas. If Im flying under the class E airspace, am I really in class B? The FAA cannot give me a logical answer to that. For that matter, no one has been able to answer that. Here's a question - under the class E airspace that starts at 700 ft, what do you call that airspace? Does class G come to mind?
 

sar104

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I live in an area 13 miles from an airport which has a class b airspace rating. Being 13 miles from the airport, the layer of class B airspace starts at 1300 ft. Under that 1300 ft is class E airspace from 700 ft. The FAA told me that I needed to contact ATC for permission to fly my uas. If Im flying under the class E airspace, am I really in class B? The FAA cannot give me a logical answer to that. For that matter, no one has been able to answer that. Here's a question - under the class E airspace that starts at 700 ft, what do you call that airspace? Does class G come to mind?
Since you are focusing on class of airspace, it sounds like you are referring to Part 107 operations. But if you are Part 107 licensed then you would already know that you are describing Class G airspace, which is open for Part 107 flights. You would also be aware that you only need to contact ATC if you are operating under an authorization or waiver that specifically requires you to do so.

That you don't seem to know that, plus the FAA telling you to contact ATC, makes it seem like you are talking about Part 101 operations, which are completely unrelated to airspace. Part 101 requires you to contact any airport and tower within 5 miles of your location.

Can you clarify whether you are asking about 107 or 101?
 
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Since you are focusing on class of airspace, it sounds like you are referring to Part 107 operations. But if you are Part 107 licensed then you would already know that you are describing Class G airspace, which is open for Part 107 flights. You would also be aware that you only need to contact ATC if you are operating under an authorization or waiver that specifically requires you to do so.

That you don't seem to know that, plus the FAA telling you to contact ATC, makes it seem like you are talking about Part 101 operations, which are completely unrelated to airspace. Part 101 requires you to contact any airport and tower within 5 miles of your location.

Can you clarify whether you are asking about 107 or 101?
I’m flying as a part 107 pilot. The outfit that took my online course with could not answer my question. It took the FAA four days to get back to me with an answer. Theirs is that even though I’m 13 miles from the airport, I’m still in class b airspace and are subject to notify ATC.

I know how the class b wedding cake works, and am stupified by the FAA. My question has always been a simple one, but to get the “experts” to understand me is astonishing. So, in summary, thank you for your response. In the future I hope I never have to rely on the FAA, and go with my knowledge even at my age (70).
 

neggy

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At 13 miles out you should be under the class B, but you might be near a regional or municipal that is Class D.

One of the places I fly is just outside of the 8 mile for KBOS, so about a half mile from me at the most, it is controlled SFC to 7000, but where I fly I am fine as the Class B is a 2000 to 7000.

What airport and what radial are you on?
Untitled.jpg
 

sar104

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I’m flying as a part 107 pilot. The outfit that took my online course with could not answer my question. It took the FAA four days to get back to me with an answer. Theirs is that even though I’m 13 miles from the airport, I’m still in class b airspace and are subject to notify ATC.

I know how the class b wedding cake works, and am stupified by the FAA. My question has always been a simple one, but to get the “experts” to understand me is astonishing. So, in summary, thank you for your response. In the future I hope I never have to rely on the FAA, and go with my knowledge even at my age (70).
In that case I'm not sure why you even asked the FAA to begin with, but fair enough. The sectional will show you exactly what class of airspace you are in and if you want to provide coordinates then you can get a sanity check on this forum. I cannot understand how anyone at the FAA could get the airspace class that wrong unless they completely misunderstood your question.
 

Skydronz

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At 13 miles out you should be under the class B, but you might be near a regional or municipal that is Class D.

One of the places I fly is just outside of the 8 mile for KBOS, so about a half mile from me at the most, it is controlled SFC to 7000, but where I fly I am fine as the Class B is a 2000 to 7000.

What airport and what radial are you on?
View attachment 43570
I'm 13 miles miles from Philadelphia Intl (PHL). Class B starts from 1300'. The FAA office told me that even if I flew my drone outside my house, I'd have to call ATC. Thats when I hung up.

The FAA was telling me about a new program for reporting to ATC. Read on.
The LAANC capability is in beta throughout 2018. The list of facilities taking part in LAANC will change during testing, including the removal of airports that previously offered the LAANC capability.
If you want to fly in controlled airspace near airports not offering LAANC, you can use the manual process to apply for an authorization, or wait until LAANC is available.

Google LAANC. It will take you to the FAA site and you can see what airports are participating so far.
 

Skydronz

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I'm 13 miles miles from Philadelphia Intl (PHL). Class B starts from 1300'. The FAA office told me that even if I flew my drone outside my house, I'd have to call ATC. Thats when I hung up.

The FAA was telling me about a new program for reporting to ATC. Read on.
The LAANC capability is in beta throughout 2018. The list of facilities taking part in LAANC will change during testing, including the removal of airports that previously offered the LAANC capability.
If you want to fly in controlled airspace near airports not offering LAANC, you can use the manual process to apply for an authorization, or wait until LAANC is available.

Google LAANC. It will take you to the FAA site and you can see what airports are participating so far.
BTW - Below the class B at 1300' is class E from 700'. No other airports. I Called half a dozen heliports nearby, who said just keep a lookout. So under the 700' is technically class G airspace, which the FAA won't agree with me on.
 

neggy

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OK here is my take, anything below 700 us not controlled airspace, unless you are within ONE mile of an airport, helicopter pad, etc, you can fly up to 400' above ground and in theory above a building/tower up to 600', as long as you maintain vertical and horizontal separation, are not in clouds, are the proper distance away from a cloud vertically and horizontally. ( edited to reflect the revelation there is Class E airspace in play )
 

sar104

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OK here is my take, anything below 700 us not controlled airspace, unless you are within ONE mile of an airport, helicopter pad, etc, you can fly up to 400' above ground and in theory above a building/tower up to 600', as long as you maintain vertical and horizontal separation, are not in clouds, are the proper distance away from a cloud vertically and horizontally. ( edited to reflect the revelation there is Class E airspace in play )
The existence of an airport doesn't, per se, change the class of airspace class. If an airport is under 700 ft Class E and has no surface Class E then it is still in Class G.
 

neggy

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The existence of an airport doesn't, per se, change the class of airspace class. If an airport is under 700 ft Class E and has no surface Class E then it is still in Class G.
The reason I mention airports is you still have to follow the rules for notification, a Part 107 has to notify when within a mile
 

Skydronz

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The reason I mention airports is you still have to follow the rules for notification, a Part 107 has to notify when within a mile
Here's a thought....... Would you ACTUALLY fly up to 400' within one mile of Philadelphia International Airport? The word crazy comes to mind.....
 

Skydronz

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There is no such requirement under Part 107. Where did you get that from?
And if someone would check sky vector.com, you'll see the Phillies are in town playing the Red Sox - - right next to the airport! Oh yeah, fly within one mile of the airport, fly over the stadium at the same time, and maybe hit a commercial airliner all in one night. Wow! no wonder drone pilots have been getting a bum wrap.
 

sar104

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And if someone would check sky vector.com, you'll see the Phillies are in town playing the Red Sox - - right next to the airport! Oh yeah, fly within one mile of the airport, fly over the stadium at the same time, and maybe hit a commercial airliner all in one night. Wow! no wonder drone pilots have been getting a bum wrap.
Were you agreeing or disagreeing with me on that? The TFR certainly closes the airspace to UAVs, but KPHL is surface Class B out to 8 NM, so the one mile question is moot there anyway - you would need airspace authorization, not just to contact ATC.

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