Welcome Mavic Pilot!
Jump in and join our free DJI Mavic community today!
Sign up

First Post - 40 second Canadian Roadtrip video

macfawlty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
234
Reaction score
182
Location
Washington, DC
Good scenes. I wouldn't speed up the clip over the river as water always looks best at natural speed. Use speed ramping to cover distance in real-time clips.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Metallic Hawk

Metallic Hawk

Member
Joined
Sep 18, 2019
Messages
9
Reaction score
9
Age
47
Location
San Marcos, CA, USA
Here's a video on speed ramping drone footage

Also, here's one for using Warp Stabilizer for drone footage. Very useful for smoothing out yaw movements that are less than perfect (the most challenging moves in droning).
Thanks a lot!! I need information like this.
 

macfawlty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
234
Reaction score
182
Location
Washington, DC
Thanks a lot!! I need information like this.
Yeh, so do I. I hadn't used the warp stabilizer for drone footage before, so that will come in handy.

With a long distance clip you're anticipating using speed ramp in post, make sure you're flying straight. Unless/until you've got a very deft touch with the yaw, fly straight as a general rule. Avoid yaw until you can do smooth combination moves with altitude and yaw (left), forward/backwards and gimbal tilt. A straight shot flown slightly off axis always looks better than a yaw correction to maintain the axis. Sometimes it looks better to just fly a crossing axis.

It's most important to soften your gimbal settings and yaw. I set my yaw to the lowest setting of 30%. I wish it went to 20% because I'm barely moving the joystick off the center position. Together with elevation change (at 11:00 or 5:00), it's hard to do smoothly. The POI can take some of the challenge out of manual control, still leaving you with controls for elevation and right gimbal for an expanding/contracting spiral (my newest fav move).

Gimbal tilt creates your easiest and most dramatic cinematic moves. It looks good forward and backward, up and down, etc. IMO, a gimbal tilt-down should be accompanied by an increase in elevation, maintaining the axis between the gimbal and center point of the frame you started the tilt. Looks like a convex curve. A gimbal tilt up is often accompanied by a decrease in elevation, creating a concave curve like you're swooping in. Get your gimbal settings perfect.

When you watch your footage, scrutinize your moves and anticipate how you SHOULD have done it. In the field, eventually it becomes natural, when to tilt down/up, elevation, yaw, etc. If you want something really challenging, try a gentle yaw with increase in elevation and gimbal tilt down, sort of like a helicopter going vertical. It can make for a very dramatic swoop and spin for a tight turnaround. Doing a 180 looks awful with the gimbal on the horizon. Typically, you're just trying to turnaround so you can start filming in the other direction, but if you can master a tilt-down/elevate 180, it could cut into an edit really well.


Here's a good one for camera/color settings.

 
Last edited:

macfawlty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
234
Reaction score
182
Location
Washington, DC
Here’s a compendium of 71 cinematic drone/gimbal moves for reference. Also, links to an excel spreadsheet you can highlight and put in your drone case. Moves you’d never think of when you’re in the field. I refer to it often.

 

macfawlty

Well-Known Member
Joined
Nov 4, 2018
Messages
234
Reaction score
182
Location
Washington, DC
We make all the mistakes so hopefully you don't have to.

When you're just flying around trying stuff it doesn't matter so much, but when you travel to a worthy destination, you want to be ready to capture the absolute best footage. Post-production isn't nearly as important as you can always re-edit down the road. Plus, post-production is sooo much easier when you're not trying to cover mistakes. As a pro videographer, it's a lesson I learn on every shoot, anticipating all of the issues, thinking quickly on-location and not making mistakes I've made in the past.
 

Proffy

Well-Known Member
Joined
Jun 24, 2019
Messages
251
Reaction score
196
Age
38
Nice!
 
  • Like
Reactions: Metallic Hawk

PAW

Well-Known Member
Premium Pilot
Joined
Apr 25, 2019
Messages
230
Reaction score
206
Location
NorCal & SouOre
We make all the mistakes so hopefully you don't have to.

When you're just flying around trying stuff it doesn't matter so much, but when you travel to a worthy destination, you want to be ready to capture the absolute best footage. Post-production isn't nearly as important as you can always re-edit down the road. Plus, post-production is sooo much easier when you're not trying to cover mistakes. As a pro videographer, it's a lesson I learn on every shoot, anticipating all of the issues, thinking quickly on-location and not making mistakes I've made in the past.
Nice resources... a bunch of us are going to find them valuable. Thanks
 
  • Like
Reactions: Metallic Hawk

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
70,442
Messages
815,532
Members
97,585
Latest member
Smisteph