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Have you tested the drone delivery app yet?

Meta4

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#81
Zing say they are looking at paying $5 per delivery.
It wouldn't be an economic prospect at that rate, even if there was work and all the problems were solved.
 
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RayOZ

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#82
And that’s where I am- if the model for Uber works to get McDonald’s delivered with a dollar still in it for all parties- while ever the punters are ordering the drone solution should be a go. It must cost less to fly something 5km than have a driver take it. The novelty and convenience will most likely see a lot of people happy to pay a premium.
I can't say there's much money to be made. It means margin for everyone involved to be low. And I think the delivery companies are just bleeding investor money trying to keep it going, and the delivery folks make really low wage, riding scooters or bikes to cut cost. In the city where I work, there's folks on the street handing out $10 vouchers for Uber Eats, etc.
 
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WithTheBirds

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#83
I can't say there's much money to be made. It means margin for everyone involved to be low. And I think the delivery companies are just bleeding investor money trying to keep it going, and the delivery folks make really low wage, riding scooters or bikes to cut cost. In the city where I work, there's folks on the street handing out $10 vouchers for Uber Eats, etc.
We won’t need to wait long to find out. Depending on the product there is plenty of fat in some products where they can effectively cover a good portion of the delivery cost and still make money. I have asked several food outfits I know how they feel about the significant cut UBER eats takes and the answer is consistent, if they don’t join the party their competitors will take their share. They see those sales as additional at lower profit rather than discounting on regular trade.
 

WithTheBirds

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#85
I'm surprised that CASA have gone along with it over a suburban area. Trial of drone delivery systems
Google must be quite persuasive.
It will obviously give them lots to work with on how drone delivery might be implemented.
I can't imagine that low value takeaway food or convenience items would make for a viable delivery business.
But I wouldn't have thought Uber Eats (or bottled water) would be either.

Here's the first time drone delivery was offered:
Australian Startups Zookal And Flirtey To Begin Delivering Textbook Orders By Drone
Nothing was delivered and it was just a publicity stunt that spawned many imitators but the video is interesting to watch.
It sucked everyone in and succeeded in gaining lots of publicity.
About 6 weeks later Amazon somehow got CBS and 60 Minutes to create a 14-minute free ad spot for Amazon on the eve of Cyber Monday:
Amazon Promised Drone Delivery In Five Years... Five Years Ago

Back then it was drone delivery for publicity.
The ACT trial shows they have come further toward actually delivering something but still have hurdles to overcome.
To my way of thinking, what to deliver is one of them.
Seems the trial is going down spectacularly with the community.

News Canberra: Drone delivery trial by Wings angers neighbours
 
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WithTheBirds

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#87
Yeah, the Noise Pollution issue will need to be addressed as a matter of high priority.
I find it entertaining that those whining the loudest seeming have all day to stand outside waiting to sight one so the can complain.... The sound couldn’t be as offensive as is being made out in the reporting surely.
 
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crystal-pete

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#88
I find it entertaining that those whining the loudest seeming have all day to stand outside waiting to sight one so the can complain.... The sound couldn’t be as offensive as is being made out in the reporting surely.
Yeah but whining about the whiners adds no value to the discussion. The Noise issue is real - don't doubt that for a second.
 
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Thunderdrones

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#90
The person in the article claims that a drone is louder than an F1 race car. He has obviously never heard an F1 race car.

These are the same people who complain about commercial air traffic above their homes.

"Robyn said the noise was "distressing". (A Current Affair)" Robyn is standing at the window, looks to be indoors, and is complaining that she is distressed. Robyn obviously doesnt have any children or grandchildren.
 
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WithTheBirds

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#91
The person in the article claims that a drone is louder than an F1 race car. He has obviously never heard an F1 race car.

These are the same people who complain about commercial air traffic above their homes.

"Robyn said the noise was "distressing". (A Current Affair)" Robyn is standing at the window, looks to be indoors, and is complaining that she is distressed. Robyn obviously doesnt have any children or grandchildren.
If one crashed in a back yard the burrito would be eaten before the authorities were alerted....
 

crystal-pete

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#92
So again we go down a fruitless road of arguing pointlessly about how noisy or annoying drones are, or the types of people who complain about them, or how the press misrepresents the subject matter. And TBH I would suggest that they would be no more annoying than those buzzing little Uber Eats motor scooters.

But the thing about gaining approval to launch a new type of venture such as Drone Delivery from government authorities is that you have to pass all of the tests, one of them being public acceptability. Unless there is real potential for a massive boost to government revenue (e.g. taxes and/or royalties) then the vocal minority (i.e. in this case, drone haters) will most likely have the biggest influence on the outcome.
 
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WithTheBirds

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#93
So again we go down a fruitless road of arguing pointlessly about how noisy or annoying drones are, or the types of people who complain about them, or how the press misrepresents the subject matter. And TBH I would suggest that they would be no more annoying than those buzzing little Uber Eats motor scooters.

But the thing about gaining approval to launch a new type of venture such as Drone Delivery from government authorities is that you have to pass all of the tests, one of them being public acceptability. Unless there is real potential for a massive boost to government revenue (e.g. taxes and/or royalties) then the vocal minority (i.e. in this case, drone haters) will most likely have the biggest influence on the outcome.
Fruitless road? Pointless arguing about the reporting- we know how that works.

The noise issue can be measured and assessed. The agitators and grizzlers need to demonstrate an existing or potential problem- they need something more than “we don’t like them”.

Arguably the most ridiculous and spectacularly ignorant assertion in that media report was the suggestion that the fact special exemptions were required from CASA to provide for conduct of the trial means it should never have been allowed. The presumption being legislation cant be modified to account for new an emerging technology and use cases. Why have the provision to grant exemptions? If that’s the best argument they have they have no hope.

The aviation authorities are more concerned with safety than community acceptability.
 
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crystal-pete

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#94
The noise issue can be measured and assessed. The agitators and grizzlers need to demonstrate an existing or potential problem- they need something more than “we don’t like them”.
Yeah, but noise pollution is taken very seriously - a flock of 12 propellor drones ain't gonna be music to anyone's ears.

The aviation authorities are more concerned with safety than community acceptability.
Didn't think there was any point in stating the obvious - but thanks for doing so.
 
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WithTheBirds

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#95
Yeah, but noise pollution is taken very seriously - a flock of 12 propellor drones ain't gonna be music to anyone's ears.



Didn't think there was any point in stating the obvious - but thanks for doing so.
Was obvious in what respect- to clarify CASA has made it very clear, with respect to this approval and other matters- community objection, environmental impacts and privacy are not relavent considerations in their granting exemptions/approvals.

No need to be snarky. You shouldn’t assume we all know everything. I didn’t make any presumptions about what might be obvious to you....
 
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crystal-pete

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#96
Was obvious in what respect- to clarify CASA has made it very clear, with respect to this approval and other matters- community objection, environmental impacts and privacy are not relavent considerations in their granting exemptions/approvals.

No need to be snarky. You shouldn’t assume we all know everything. I didn’t make any presumptions about what might be obvious to you....
Wasn't being "snarky" but, whatever you reckon. So long as people don't get the impression that CASA is the only authority involved here. CASA might grant approval but local councils could veto based on Noise pollution complaints.

End result following Council veto - no Drone deliveries allowed within Council boundaries.
 
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WithTheBirds

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#97
Wasn't being "snarky" but, whatever you reckon. So long as people don't get the impression that CASA is the only authority involved here. CASA might grant approval but local councils could veto based on Noise pollution complaints.

End result following Council veto - no Drone deliveries allowed within Council boundaries.
Local councils have limited authority here- they don’t own the airspace. Have a look at all the existing council regulations now (in our country). That can have a lot of say about what happens on or is controlled from public space and property they control. It’s refer to CASA guidelines outside that.
 
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crystal-pete

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#98
DroningOn said:
Commercially viable “drone delivery” is a complete farce. Anyone who has flown one knows this is true. There is no way this works practically or financially. Entities who are promoting this nonsense are just looking for free advertising (Amazon) or trying to raise money under false pretenses.

You're a real visionary...
I would suggest that he (@DroningOn ) is a Realist.
 
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ManOf

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Commercially viable “drone delivery” is a complete farce. Anyone who has flown one knows this is true. There is no way this works practically or financially. Entities who are promoting this nonsense are just looking for free advertising (Amazon) or trying to raise money under false pretenses.
This could be for real. There are many reports that Google here in Australia have done 50,000 test flights in Adelaide for food and goods delivery. It looks like they have many of their own custom drones.
Surf clubs in Western Australia have been testing float drops to people in need of rescue.
 

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