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How to supply client with inspection footage

Harry.Stuart

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Feb 24, 2017
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Hey guys,

This is my first post here so I hope this is the right category to be posting in. For explanation's sake; assume a client wanted me to inspect the roof of their factory, including checking their gutters, roof infrastructure etc etc. If I had 15 minutes worth of 1080p (compressed from 4k) footage of the inspection, what do I do next. I am intending on creating an aerial inspection service but do not want to disclose its specifics, however, I was wondering if anyone with some experience would be able to help me. What do I do after recording the footage? Do I send it straight to the client and let them analyse or do I take it home with me and analyse it myself, providing the customer with a report? Basically, is it generally considered my responsibility to analyse the footage or theirs? (I am a one man show by the way so no one else to do it for me) Or am I missing something entirely?

Cheers guys. it is much appreciated!

Kind regards, Harry
 
I'm not experienced at all with this type of thing, but if I were to call someone in to do something like that, I would expect a report of what was checked, what was found and a compiled video of the various aspects of the inspection (eg., a 5 minute overview, focusing on shots of the issues found). I wouldn't expect someone who does this type of thing to provide me with raw footage.
 
If you're talking about what format, I would recommend you provide (and test) video files that play well on a two-year-old copy of Windows, and maybe also a two-year-old copy of Mac OSX. Companies don't update video player software just because someone sent a newfangled .MOV file.
 
Big difference between purely providing footage and letting the client decide how they wish to proceed and then you providing the advice. If you go down the route of you providing advice suggest you buy a hefty Professional Liability policy.
 
If you're talking about what format, I would recommend you provide (and test) video files that play well on a two-year-old copy of Windows, and maybe also a two-year-old copy of Mac OSX. Companies don't update video player software just because someone sent a newfangled .MOV file.
Yeah. Bring a USB with VLC ;)

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The simple answer is that you discuss the job with your client, and find out what they want. You can then quote a price based on what's expected...a "fly and show" is relatively quick, but an analysis and report is going to take you much longer.

Also, do you have the relevant expertise to provide a report and recommendations? (And have you got your part 107?).
 
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The simple answer is that you discuss the job with your client, and find out what they want. You can then quote a price based on what's expected...a "fly and show" is relatively quick, but an analysis and report is going to take you much longer.

Also, do you have the relevant expertise to provide a report and recommendations? (And have you got your part 107?).

This x10. Are you creating a startup business and decided to look at MavicPilots for advice on how to do it?

Sounds to me like you should cut the clips into different sections of the building and send them lightly edited footage. If you make the first review of the footage (and charge them for it) then you are opening yourself up for all kinds of law suits.
 
What is your particular job in this case inspector or simply photographer? I would write a report based on my analysis of the footage depending on what you are doing. Are you A. Just supplying them with the footage and letting them make the determination of whats good or bad. or B. Supplying the footage and its your job to point out the good and bad?
If its A I would expect the inspection is not your area of expertise and just would expect footage.
If its B I would absolutely expect a report from you.
 
Hey guys,

This is my first post here so I hope this is the right category to be posting in. For explanation's sake; assume a client wanted me to inspect the roof of their factory, including checking their gutters, roof infrastructure etc etc. If I had 15 minutes worth of 1080p (compressed from 4k) footage of the inspection, what do I do next. I am intending on creating an aerial inspection service but do not want to disclose its specifics, however, I was wondering if anyone with some experience would be able to help me. What do I do after recording the footage? Do I send it straight to the client and let them analyse or do I take it home with me and analyse it myself, providing the customer with a report? Basically, is it generally considered my responsibility to analyse the footage or theirs? (I am a one man show by the way so no one else to do it for me) Or am I missing something entirely?

Cheers guys. it is much appreciated!

Kind regards, Harry

Focus on the contract.

Are you qualified to interpret the video? (Are you a structural engineer, inspector, etc.) If not, then do not interpret it and make that clear in the service contract. That of course may reduce the value of the service as perceived by the client.
  • In the US photography belongs to the photographer unless the contract says different.
  • In Canada the photography belongs to the customer, unless the contract says different.
So important to know the law where you are, and to specify details in the contract.

For what you propose, I would make the provided footage the property of the client but that you would have promotional usage rights to use it as well.

You would also need to provide a lot of still shots of critical areas.

It would also be useful for critical things that an employee of the client be with you to be sure you document things that are of critical interest to him.

It would probably be worth a few hundred bucks or a case of scotch to get a building/structural inspector to brief you in detail before you begin pitching your service.
 
Thank you all so much for the advice! First of all I am in Australia and because the mavic pro is under 2kg, as long as I fly responsibly, there are no limitations and I can use it for commercial uses to. Other than flying drones I have no structural engineering or any sort of qualifications. However, I don't see this as necessary for my business. The whole point of my business is to avoid quotes and just have certain "inspection packages" customers can buy. Which is what makes this difficult. The thing is though, I won't be inspecting commercial properties or be inspecting critical structures. In fact my service is residential based and provides solely an indication of the roof or fence etc. My concern is though, It would be quite tedious for a customer to sit through 10 minutes of footage. Yet if I did a lot of editing and analysis in post I fear that I would have to increase the price of my service and it would put customers off. Would it maybe be a good idea to have one of "inspection packages" inclusive of my analysis for an extra price and an option for people to just receive the raw footage if they do not want to pay for it?

Cheers guys
 
Your first post talked about a factory roof, which gave the impression that you would be be dealing with commercial entities, which is why you got the replies above.
I don't think any house owner would be bored sitting through a 10 minute video of "their" property, and I would think your best bet would be to do the shoot and hand them the footage on a pen drive....job done!
You've already said that you don't have any qualifications, so I don't see that you're in a position to give an analysis...the client can do that themselves from the footage provided.
You should definitely get some form of liability insurance to protect yourself if things go wrong.
 
I am sorry that I implied it was for industrial purposes. It's just that I am reluctant at times to give away information regarding my business but with the responses I got I realised that you guys are great people!

When they purchase my service they have to provide their email address and I will send them the footage. The problem for pricing still remains because to avoid using quotes is hard. How much money would you be willing to pay for an inspection of your roof, assuming you had no to little knowledge of drones (ie a lot of Australians)?


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