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Mavic 3 has no explore mode or full zoom?!?

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You might want to reword that as it's just not correct.
Nope.

The term "crop" existent well before digital sensors, and has nothing to do with them. It refers to focusing in and enlarging a portion of an image.

The sensor (digital image sensor, film, eyeball) is irrelevant, as is the means by which the image data is captured or enlarged.

In the darkroom, photos are cropped by optically enlarging them and trimming with a frame then exposing photo paper to the cropped image.

From Merriam-Webster:
crop
2 of 2

verb

cropped; cropping
transitive verb
1
a
: to remove the upper or outer parts of
crop a hedge

crop a dog's ears

b
: HARVEST
crop trout

c
: to cut off short : TRIM
crop a photograph
 
Should also point out that an optically zoomed image is also cropped, the same as the digitally zoomed image.

So, if I view a scene with the 1X lens on my M3 and then change to the 7X lens and shoot a photo, you're suggesting that the image has been cropped?

Similarly if I had a 1-7X optical zoom lens and adjusted it from 1X to 7X, you'd say that I'd cropped the image?

The vast majority of the world simply isn't as concerned with the distinction as you and a few others are.
I haven't surveyed the vast majority of the world, but I know far more than a few people who distinguish between (optical) zoom and digital zoom. Most camera manufacturers do.
 
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Nope.

The term "crop" existent well before digital sensors, and has nothing to do with them. It refers to focusing in and enlarging a portion of an image.

The sensor (digital image sensor, film, eyeball) is irrelevant, as is the means by which the image data is captured or enlarged.

In the darkroom, photos are cropped by optically enlarging them and trimming with a frame then exposing photo paper to the cropped image.

From Merriam-Webster:
crop
2 of 2

verb

cropped; cropping
transitive verb
1
a
: to remove the upper or outer parts of
crop a hedge

crop a dog's ears

b
: HARVEST
crop trout

c
: to cut off short : TRIM
crop a photograph

(Ok, this is totally just a humorous comment. If I use emojis, I'd include one.)

Who used the phrase "annoyingly pedantic?"

Disclaimer: I myself have caught and eaten hundreds of trout, but I've never cropped a single one.
 
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So, if I view a scene with the 1X lens on my M3 and then change to the 7X lens and shoot a photo, you're suggesting that the image has been cropped?

Similarly if I had a 1-7X optical zoom lens and adjusted it from 1X to 7X, you'd say that I'd cropped the image?
Like so many things, it depends.

It's an ambitious term. Has become much more so since the advent of digital photography. Flying cameras have added further ambiguity.

Take a picture with the 1x lens, no zoom. Then switch to the 7x lens an shoot a picture of something in the first image.

Print both on 4x6 printer photo paper. Show them to people and ask if the second image is cropped from the first.

If the know the meaning of the term – common usage – what do you think will be the response? I claim it will be overwhelmingly "yes".

Exclude imaging professionals and hobbyists, barely a blip against the general population, and "yes" will nearly be the universal answer.

Its not a precise term like "meters per second". Some people will refer to a zoomed image that's contained in another image as a crop. Others will not, for reasons in this thread.

Both are right.
 
Like so many things, it depends.

It's an ambitious term. Has become much more so since the advent of digital photography. Flying cameras have added further ambiguity.

Take a picture with the 1x lens, no zoom. Then switch to the 7x lens an shoot a picture of something in the first image.

Print both on 4x6 printer photo paper. Show them to people and ask if the second image is cropped from the first.

If the know the meaning of the term – common usage – what do you think will be the response? I claim it will be overwhelmingly "yes".

Exclude imaging professionals and hobbyists, barely a blip against the general population, and "yes" will nearly be the universal answer.

Its not a precise term like "meters per second". Some people will refer to a zoomed image that's contained in another image as a crop. Others will not, for reasons in this thread.

Both are right.

Exclude imaging professionals and hobbyists,

I'm not focused on the "vast majority of the world,' but with the "imaging professionals and hobbyists" who populate this forum. As you point out, the differences are significant to them.

Similarly, the general public probably considers "altitude" to be exclusively the height of something above their heads. But here it's critical to differentiate between altitude MSL, altitude AGL, and altitude above takeoff elevation.

The general public's indifference to terminology and nomenclature shouldn't be adopted by UAS pilots who are professionals and serious hobbyists, as represented by this forum.
 
The general public's indifference to terminology and nomenclature shouldn't be adopted by UAS pilots who are professionals and serious hobbyists, as represented by this forum.
Righteous, IMO, and a POV I support.

Use terms with greater precision than the general public does. You're not wrong to do so.

What I object to is telling people they're wrong to use an imprecise term in the manner it's commonly used, which is what got me involved in the conversation. That's arrogant and obnoxious when they're use is every bit as valid in their experience for the functionality in question.

As I've said, most DJI drone owners care nothing for the fine details of aviation terminology, how their drone operates, or professional photography details. They want to get their Mini2 in the air and take pictures of their Daughter's quinceañera at the beach.

Why is it a problem to accept everyone's usage of the terms, and just be more specific where necessary? Why is it necessary for some to tell others they're wrong when using a term the way everyone they know use it?
 
Righteous, IMO, and a POV I support.

Use terms with greater precision than the general public does. You're not wrong to do so.

What I object to is telling people they're wrong to use an imprecise term in the manner it's commonly used, which is what got me involved in the conversation. That's arrogant and obnoxious when they're use is every bit as valid in their experience for the functionality in question.

I suppose some might consider your insistence that everyone use imprecise terms as bothersome. (I just find it curious.)
As I've said, most DJI drone owners care nothing for the fine details of aviation terminology, how their drone operates, or professional photography details. They want to get their Mini2 in the air and take pictures of their Daughter's quinceañera at the beach.

Well, again, most DJI drone owners do not participate in this forum. I suspect that most don't know even about TRUST or the 400' altitude limit and don't care, and have never shot a photo or video in anything other than auto mode. This forum is not for the indifferent, unconcerned, and uninformed crowd who just shoot snapshots. Why adopt their standards?

Why is it a problem to accept everyone's usage of the terms, and just be more specific where necessary? Why is it necessary for some to tell others they're wrong when using a term the way everyone they know use it?

We're not concerned with everyone here, but with a group of professionals and serious hobbyists who joined a forum to learn and share information. The zoom/optical zoom/digital zoom thing is not going to cause an accident or kill anyone. But the confusion it causes can lead to someone buying a drone that doesn't deliver what they expected and can hinder people in developing a better understanding of photography and videography.

To pose a question similar to yours, why is it a problem to say digital zoom when you mean digital zoom?

(The wind has been blowing in the 20s here for three days. Otherwise I'd be tinkering with the waypoints feature on the M3. Or looking for redfish in the marsh.)
 
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The vast majority of the world simply isn't as concerned with the distinction as you and a few others are.

Words are defined in how they're used by the vast majority of speakers. Many are ambiguous. So what? We clear up the ambiguity when necessary, and when no one cares, it's annoyingly pedantic to insist on it.
This philosophy is making a virtue out of ignorance.
Following this logic, words mean nothing and it's correct to misuse them (relative to to their accepted meanings).
But you seem to have also decided that it's wrong to use words correctly according to their accepted meanings??

"Zoom" to most of the world means, "make a part of this image bigger and fill the screen". Until it visually degrades the enlarged image for the person viewing it, no one but people who use images professionally cares how it was enlarged.

Should also point out that an optically zoomed image is also cropped, the same as the digitally zoomed image.
That statement is only correct if we accept that words have no meaning and it's correct to say whatever you like.

An optically zoomed image is not cropped at all, and certainly not the same as a digitally zoomed image..
By changing the focal length of the lens, you change the apparent distance of the camera from the subject.
The resulting image has the same pixel size.

Digital "zoom" enlarges pixels in the center of the photo and crops out the rest, digital zoom gives the appearance of magnifying the subject, while also lessening resolution and image quality.
Chopping and discarding part of an image is not the same as using a zoom lens to create a full resolution image ... unless you employ a new non-meaning for the word same.
 
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