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Puzzling to me

JDHarrin

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Hi all, although I've had my Part 107 remote pilot license for seven years now, I primarily fly for personal enjoyment. Being retired, I watch a lot of Youtube videos. I can't figure out for the life of me why their are soooooo many videos testing drone distance, when you can't legally fly beyond line of sight recreationally, or commercially without a waiver. Unless you have an Inspire or larger drone, you can't see these things in the air more than a couple hundred feet away, so what's the big deal about distance? :cool:
 
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Hi all, although I've had my Part 107 remote pilot license for seven years now, I primarily fly for personal enjoyment. Being retired, I watch a lot of Youtube videos. I can't figure out for the life of me why their are soooooo many videos testing drone distance, when you can't legally fly beyond line of sight recreationally, or commercially without a waiver. Unless you have an Inspire or larger drone, you can't see these things in the air more than a couple hundred feet away, so what's the big deal about distance? :cool:
Lots of older posts (many still unlocked) in this forum discussing the pros and cons of vlos and bvlos; you may want to chime in on one of those if you get past the first 5 pages and still don't start to pick up on the idea. :)
 
It "sells more soap" for their sponsors and in turn more cash.
Most of these videos only briefly mention it is illegal if even they do. I have had many a prospective new pilot ask me questions like How far CAN it go or Will it go 120 like I saw on youtue Because they are completely unaware of the responsibility of drone ownership until they break the seal or take the TRUST..
I too find them questionable BUT its a free country so I can only let the folks that watch these things Know that they will be breaking the law.
 
I also believe that the VLOS may be a Merica thing. Different rules on different parts of the planet.
 
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I also believe that the VLOS may be a Merica thing. Different rules on different parts of the planet.
Name one country where flying BVLOS is allowed.
 
what's the big deal about distance?
One thought would be just that, distance. Possibly the pilot wants to see something that may be inaccessible by any other means. The camera systems on these products have progressed substantially in the last few years.
 
The frank, honest answer is very simple: It's generally an unnecessary rule for safe operation, everyone knows it including the FAA, so it's very loosely enforced, and is generally allowed to be routinely violated when there is no realistic risk scenario.

No government authority will ever acknowledge this in any "official" way, because, well, "authority". It's illegal to drive 38 in a 35mph zone, but speeding tickets are rarely ever issued for <5mph over the speed limit, and those that are are never upheld in court.

Just like the FAA, I would never encourage anyone to fly BVLOS, or FPV without a spotter.

But we sure all love each other's pictures and video 😁😁😁

Public servants use the law as one tool among many to maintain public safety, order, and protect people's rights. Tyrants use the law to, "make you do what I (govt) say". Free societies generally operate under the former "rule of law" philosophy, not the latter.
 
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I will fly with goggles on and no spotter on my private property and with tinywhoops. Thats why I love my whoops so much they cant hurt anyone BUT then again I fly alone only on my property - If I want to go to the park I take a friend.
 
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I will fly with goggles on and no spotter on my private property and with tinywhoops. Thats why I love my whoops so much they cant hurt anyone BUT then again I fly alone only on my property - If I want to go to the park I take a friend.
What is a whoop or tinywhoop?
 
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Wherever you dont get caught, besides most evey pot has lost sight of their done even if its a second or two...
With your line of reasoning, any crime is ok so long as you don't get caught.
 
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The frank, honest answer is very simple: It's generally an unnecessary rule for safe operation, everyone knows it including the FAA, so it's very loosely enforced, and is generally allowed to be routinely violated when there is no realistic risk scenario.
The Frank HONEST answer is, the FAA requires you to fly VLOS period. There is no need for discussion on this. We all know there are many that disregard this regulation but that is not to make it an acceptable practice and/or promote it.
The idea of "so long as I don't get caught" simply does not make it right.
 
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The Frank HONEST answer is, the FAA requires you to fly VLOS period. There is no need for discussion on this. We all know there are many that disregard this regulation but that is not to make it an acceptable practice and/or promote it.
The idea of "so long as I don't get caught" simply does not make it right.
So I have just read through all of the above posts, and I have a theoretical question.

I am hiking with a friend or my wife on a deep in the woods service road through a dense forest of tall pines at a resort area. There are no people around anywhere behind or in front of me. Nor cars. I put my drone up to be sure I am going to clear the tall trees. The moment I fly more than 10-15 feet, the drone goes out of sight ( unless I follow the road). So now I am really enjoying the drone view soaring over the tops of the pine forest. Especially if I turn the gimbal straight down. I cannot see the drone because of the density of the forest besides the road. I would necessarily only be able to retrieve my drone by hitting the RTC button.

So this example of flying beyond visual line of sight, even though I am close to my drone, is what irks me about the regulation.

I predict two sorts of comments- the official ones and the pragmatic ones.

What say you all? See attached.

Dale
Miami
 

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One popular youtube video was testing distance over water using an A2 with a Rescue Jacket. It was exciting cuz he barely made it home with 10% battery left. FAA used that video to bust him for BVLOS flight and faced consequences (a fine I believe).
Conclusion: don't post your drone violations
 
So I have just read through all of the above posts, and I have a theoretical question.

I am hiking with a friend or my wife on a deep in the woods service road through a dense forest of tall pines at a resort area. There are no people around anywhere behind or in front of me. Nor cars. I put my drone up to be sure I am going to clear the tall trees. The moment I fly more than 10-15 feet, the drone goes out of sight ( unless I follow the road). So now I am really enjoying the drone view soaring over the tops of the pine forest. Especially if I turn the gimbal straight down. I cannot see the drone because of the density of the forest besides the road. I would necessarily only be able to retrieve my drone by hitting the RTC button.

So this example of flying beyond visual line of sight, even though I am close to my drone, is what irks me about the regulation.

I predict two sorts of comments- the official ones and the pragmatic ones.

What say you all? See attached.

Dale
Miami
kinda both pragmatic and official. it appears the faa enforcement is highly discretion but they better be careful when it comes time to enforcement because you can't really just overlook everything and then come out against someone when you feel like it. imagine if the police could clock dozens of cars driving 85 in a 55 and ignore them all but when you pass by in your ford doing 84 in a 55, he pulls you over out of crowd. that's the pragmatic in me but to be honest, the police can do that as long as his decision is not based on prohibited factors. apply that same thinking to the drone world and i've seen it happen at least once with nobody around and no harm done (yes the risk is elevated but nothing imminent or reckless) and the authorities took exception not based on safety but based on something else and used this as a pretext. in my example, the police hate ford cars which is not illegal btw.

my final comment on the issue is the rule is there not entirely for safety but also an almost foolproof method to hold drone flyers accountable if necessary. same with fpv spotters. there are exactly zero drone flyers who "keep their drone within vlos at all times to satisfy even the strictest interpretation of the law." just like using your turn signal 150 feet from the intersection, any officer can say you used it at 149 and stop you regardless. it's up to you to fight it and if you win, changes nothing.
 
Exactly, happens every day, no victim no crime
But in our hobbies case the victim is usually A victim-- look I'm a Tinywhoop addict and I fly in my Backyard alone sometimes BUT I know very well there are consequences to me doing so no matter if I think I am right or wrong. Someday they are going to ease up a little on us until then its just not a good idea BUT Around the jungle gym in my yard on a nice evening or morning...Well Sorry.Im doin some gaps with the whoop!
 
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