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DJI FPV vs DJI Avata ... which should I go for?

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Debating on getting either the DJI FPV or the Avata. FPV would be cheaper and with prop guards feels safer to learn on. Though I like the size of the Avata, but it's costlier since you would need to buy standard controller if you don't like the stick. Thoughts on which is better to learn FPV on?
 
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...which is better to learn FPV on?

Depends on what you mean by "FPV"..?

Is it just flying with goggles in Normal or Sport mode, then it doesn't matter, it's just to get used to not seeing anything else than the live screen... the drone itself will behave exactly as any other GPS stabilized photo drone.

If you mean flying with goggles in full manual mode... I recommend 30-50h practice in a simulator first, then go for a Cinewhoop like model... like the Avata, which is more reasonable power wise, have prop guards & more suitable for calmer cruising/cinematic flights.
 
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I learned on the FPV and later I bought the Avata and I believe it is ok to learn on the FPV for a couple of reasons. It has the standard remote and it's way less expensive and it has pretty good sensors in standard mode. I would almost say you don't need the guards. If money is an issue, I would buy a refurb or used, they are really cheap.

If they were both available at the time, for sure the Avata is easier to learn with as long as you had the standard remote. You can fly out of the box with the motion controller but it will probably take some getting use to if you are already familiar with the standard remote; but it is doable.

If you are really concerned about crashing, work the simulators as long as you can before you come away from the wide open space with no obstacles. The Avata can probably take a few hits, the FPV less likely. Unless your trying to rip it, I don't see crashing as an issue while you are in the learning stages.

I spent a couple of months on the simulators. I'm not the normal flyer so it took me a couple of months to go somewhere besides a wide open field. After 6 months, I could carefully fly anywhere. After a year, the FPV is a missile. Avata on day 1 is just plain fun and you for sure can start there but as you mentioned, it costs more. Today I fly FPV more than Avata, 2 to 1. But it is way more fun to Avata with MC2 once you get used to it.
 
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I have an Air 2s, FPV, and Avata.

Each has its purposes, but I love flying the FPV the most by far. I also love the motion controller. It feels like you’re flying a jet. The Avata is good for low and tight spaces, but way to slow.


if I had one choice, it would be the FPV. As long as you’re not stupid, it will last a long time. Also, you can get used ones in excellent condition on EBay cheap.
 
I have the Avata, I picked the standard controller too, but I think I'll stay with the motion controller, at least till I want to do some dives, I tried on the simulator but it's quite difficult.

The motion controller (the second version) it's basically like using the mouse aim in War Thunder, you have way more precision and is way easier to learn, but you can't do any flips, dives and other advanced maneuvers.

The Avata is like a tank, you put a guard to prevent the battery from going loose on a crash and an ND filter on the camera to prevent scratches on the glass, and it will survive most of the crashes.

The downsides... The FPV googles (I have the Integra) are quite disappointing, just like watching a smartphone strapped to your head inside a box, thought it would be more like an Oculus, They also put some pressure on your nose (and I don't have a big nose) and the headband goes over your ears; it's quite uncomfortable.

It doesn't fly well on high altitude or long range, it's for interiors, low altitude flight or for exploring dense areas, mostly. I've been training in my property, but the plan is to explore some abandoned places with it. With the motion controller is super easy to fly it through trees, windows, doors, holes, etc.

The FPV is for exteriors, but one touch with anything and say goodbye to it. It's also an "old" drone these days, so chances that it gets a replacement are quite high.

Personally I use the Mavic 3 for photography, long range exploration and, thanks to the 160mm, some sort of XXI century observation balloon. I'd like to use the Avata to explore ruins and abandoned interiors, but haven't done that yet (I've been just training/crashing).

I also have the Mini 2, but I have no use for it since I moved to bigger drones, I keep it because it's completely hacked and has no alt limit, geofencing or RID emission, so could come in handy if I wanted to take pics of forbidden places whenever I travel around.
 
I do not own an FPV or Avata simply because they are very expensive to learn to fly FPV with. You can learn FPV on something MUCH cheaper than a DJI Drone. Plus DJI Drones are not very crash friendly and if you are going to fly FPV [and have fun] you are going to crash ! -ALOT
You should download a good simulator {LIFTOFF] and start your time there. It takes a little time to get used to flying ACRO.
Then- IMO purchase an EMAX [ The TinyHawk 3 is a nice analog starter drone and now you can get them with HD! cams ] or a BETAFPV tinywhoop and learn on it. Also- you will not like wearing goggles at first [no one does] you have to let yourself and your eyes get used to them it takes time after that it becomes natual.
Once you have learned. I would say your choice depends on what kind of excitment level you want.
The DJI fpv even though it is quite expensive IMO. Is Huge fun- and I could fly one all day if given the chance.
The same could be said for the avata BUT-What do you want to fly - A cessna [avata]- or a jet [fpv].
The cinewhoop will stand up to crashing slightly better BUT is not as fast as the FPV and the AVATA is also the loudest cinewhoop on the market [not a good thing] so theres that.
Whatever you decide - ! GRAB YOUR GOGGLES ! and come for the ride!! You will be hooked! -and we need more FPVers out there!
 
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I do not own an FPV or Avata simply because they are very expensive to learn to fly FPV with. You can learn FPV on something MUCH cheaper than a DJI Drone. Plus DJI Drones are not very crash friendly
I get what you're saying, but I think it's not that simple. I mean, you can get micro-FPV bundles for cheap, but that isn't going to last very long before you're upgrading every component of that bundle. If you get into FPV with an Avata, the bundle is actually a really good deal for what you get and you can keep using the goggles and controllers with better and better quads (for example, I have a quad and two cinewhoops that use the same controller and goggles as my Avata). Of course, the DJI controller and goggles aren't "the best," but they are good enough for most enthusiasts and even some pros.

I would also argue that the Avata is pretty tough for what you get (essentially a DJI GPS/camera drone that has insane battery life for an FPV drone) and with a wide array of readily-available replacement parts. I imagine some whoops out there are pretty tough, but an Avata will beat out most quads in terms of crashability.

(all that said I wouldn't recommend the Avata unconditionally because it has some potentially dangerous quirks that are actually exacerbated by all the software and sensors DJI has built into it)
 
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I do not own an FPV or Avata simply because they are very expensive to learn to fly FPV with. You can learn FPV on something MUCH cheaper than a DJI Drone. Plus DJI Drones are not very crash friendly and if you are going to fly FPV [and have fun] you are going to crash ! -ALOT
You should download a good simulator {LIFTOFF] and start your time there. It takes a little time to get used to flying ACRO.
Then- IMO purchase an EMAX [ The TinyHawk 3 is a nice analog starter drone and now you can get them with HD! cams ] or a BETAFPV tinywhoop and learn on it. Also- you will not like wearing goggles at first [no one does] you have to let yourself and your eyes get used to them it takes time after that it becomes natual.
Once you have learned. I would say your choice depends on what kind of excitment level you want.
The DJI fpv even though it is quite expensive IMO. Is Huge fun- and I could fly one all day if given the chance.
The same could be said for the avata BUT-What do you want to fly - A cessna [avata]- or a jet [fpv].
The cinewhoop will stand up to crashing slightly better BUT is not as fast as the FPV and the AVATA is also the loudest cinewhoop on the market [not a good thing] so theres that.
Whatever you decide - ! GRAB YOUR GOGGLES ! and come for the ride!! You will be hooked! -and we need more FPVers out there!
Don't you need goggles and a controller to use a simulator?
 
Don't you need goggles and a controller to use a simulator?
Only a controller, & with most simulators you can also use Xbox or PlayStation controllers... but if you're going for learning full manual control (also called Acro) you should practice with the controller you will be using when flying for real, a DJI FPV controller 2 or some other RC radio.

It would help to know what you mean by saying "learn FPV" to give a better guidance.

Flying a Avata or a DJI FPV drone & just stay in the GPS stabilized modes (Normal or Sport) will not change how the Avata or DJI FPV drone flies, they will behave as a normal photo drone ( like a Mini 3 Pro for instance)... the only thing that changes is that you have goggles on to see the live screen instead of looking at your mobile device attached on the RC... simulator practice in this case shouldn't be necessary.

But if your intentions are to learn full manual control (Acro)... everything changes regarding how the drone is controlled with the sticks, you lose all height and horizontal hold and need to handle all that by yourself. On top of this, you no more have any tilt limitations at all as a ordinary photo drone, you can easily turn the drone upside down in a split second & combination stick moves are always needed to turn. If this is your plan... go for a real RC radio first, pick your preferred simulator, put in as many hours you need in order to confident maneuver the drone a bit higher up & being able to land... then decide if you want to go for a Avata, DJI FPV drone or something else prebuilt & source the goggles in the end.

The DJI FPV controller 2

1698944669438.png

...can be used for the Avata, the DJI FPV drone & any other quad with the DJI O3 system, without any separate receiver (the DJI O3 VTX have one already built in).

If you go with another RC radio, like

1698944889069.png

you always need to chose a separate receiver for your quad & have a radio module attached to the radio with the same protocol, this type of radio solution can virtually control everything... but not the Avata & the DJI FPV drone.
 
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You do not need googles for the simulator but it is really nice! as for the controller yes you will need a controler If you get the DJI FPV your controler [ NOT MOTION } will work with the sim also a simple x-box controller kinda-works a little. BUT you can also purchase a cheap lets say FR Sky type RadioMaster controller and also use that with the sim and some drones their are many choices and variations the cheaper D-8 style radioMasters can be purchased for around 50 bucks or so on Ebay.

EDIT: Hey Slup whats up no picture of the RadioMaster Zorro My personal Driver!
1698947143396.png
 
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Debating on getting either the DJI FPV or the Avata. FPV would be cheaper and with prop guards feels safer to learn on. Though I like the size of the Avata, but it's costlier since you would need to buy standard controller if you don't like the stick. Thoughts on which is better to learn FPV on?
I fly both regularly, and they are radically different birds. The FPV is fast and in M mode can capture some fabulous swoopy and close-to-the-cliff type of flying. In close quarters it's a bull in a china shop, even if you put prop guards on it.

I fly the Avata with pinpoint precision using the Motion Controller 2. Nowhere near as fast, with built-in prop guards I feel much safer flying closer to things, even a lot of indoor flying. Plus it can do that neat trick of enabling head tracking in the goggles, which opens up new creative options when used with the RC2.
 
Also have both, and yes they're both awesome but for very different things.
The FPV is awesome for large areas, speed, mountain flying ,fast climb/dives, but it's not very precise in small areas and you really don't want to crash it even once.
The Avata is very at home in close quarters, extremely precise, flies on rails between trees etc but you'll quickly get bored if you have to do some distance or some volume to play with because it's much less powerful and slower. IMO better for learning since it'll take a beating without breaking a sweat.

Flying both with the RC in manual mode exclusively, the MC is highly uninteresting to me.
 
...EDIT: Hey Slup whats up no picture of the RadioMaster Zorro My personal Driver!
View attachment 169801
😁

Was a keyboard gamer back in the days... & when I started out with RC radios the game controller shaped ones didn't exist, so became one of those "box" radio guys in heart, soul & apparently mind.
 
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IMO better for learning since it'll take a beating without breaking a sweat.
Yes! You can crash the Avata over and over again and its light weight and design keep it from getting damaged easily.

Flying both with the RC in manual mode exclusively, the MC is highly uninteresting to me.

Manual mode will take much more time to master but really unlocks the full potential, whereas you can use the motion controller 2 almost immediately. I literally taught an 81-year old how to fly my Avata with the motion controller and he got the hang of it right away.
 
Thanks for all the feedback. I got a lot to consider. I do want to eventually use ACRO mode, so I'll look into a simulator. :) My biggest issue is getting someone to go fly with me as a VO since I won't have VLOS. :)
 
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I've built FPV quads, own and maintained RTF models, and have both the DJI FPV and Avata.

I've completely disassembled and reassembled my Avata (to clean it after flying in an extremely dirt road dust environment), and I found the technical level of skill necessary, and complexity to be on par with DIY FPV quads.
 
Most FPV flying is done illegally without a VO. The FAA knows this, and the rules are being reviewed and a proposal under development to modify the rules to accommodate limited BVLOS drone operations, including FPV.
 
I've built FPV quads, own and maintained RTF models, and have both the DJI FPV and Avata.

I've completely disassembled and reassembled my Avata (to clean it after flying in an extremely dirt road dust environment), and I found the technical level of skill necessary, and complexity to be on par with DIY FPV quads.
Building your drone from scratch is a whole new level then working on your pre programmed DJI drone there are many complexities in assembling a good drone and simply stating that you can throw parts together and Fly FPV is a HUGE miss-leading comment. If you want to build your own drone you will have to learn many things some of them have high learning curves -BetaFlight is just one such example. It takes some practice and may I say some skill to build a good drone
Most of us have moved on to building our own drones. After carefull study and some costly mistakes.

Most? FPV flying is done illegally without a VO.
I will correct this sentence with the word- Some
 
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Building your drone from scratch is a whole new level then working on your pre programmed DJI drone there are many complexities in assembling a good drone and simply stating is a HUGE miss-leading comment. If you want to build your own drone you will have to learn many things some of them have high learning curves -BetaFlight is just one such example. It takes some practice and may I say some skill to build a good drone
Most of us have moved on to building our own drones. After carefull study and some costly mistakes.

I think you misunderstood the point I was making.

I agree with everything you say above. Heck, I suspect just BetaFlight is technically too complex for most people.

The only point I was making was w.r.t. repair. I didn't find anything particularly challenging in taking apart and reassembling the Avata compared to the more typical non-DJI FPV. In fact in some ways it was easier.

And BTW, I never said or implied "that you can throw parts together and Fly FPV". Kinda putting words in my mouth, and kinda unfair. I was explicit in my post about disassembly and reassembly.
 
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