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DJI MINI 4 PRO NO WALL CHARGER ???

I would advise to buy a 45W PD charger which can than work for all devices. A little expensive to buy (30-40 bucks) but mine has been really sturdy for 1 and a half year now.


I was just looking at my various "wall pucks" and I can't find a single one that has "W" on the output. My two main ones both state:
Puck #1
USB-C output: 5V ~ 3A
USB-A output 5V ~2.4A

Puck #2
USB-A output (2x) 5V ~2.4A (total 5V~4.8A)
 
I confirmed that all (7) of ours came with the Wall Puck but it's very likely it was our vendor who put those into the cases for us. They tend to throw in freebies for Emergency Services so that's probably it.

Sorry if I brought any confusion to the table :)
no confusion. Like I said, DJI does not show the charger in the " what comes in the box" pic. Just cut backs on DJI part, and also like one earlier post, just to many chargers out there already. HAPPY NEW YEAR
 
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The last three drones I've purchased from DJI (all with FMCs) did not come with a power supply, but I didn't actually realize it until well after the fact. I placed the battery hubs into my charging area and connected to available power. I didn't even unpack the cords.

What I use mostly nowadays are 65w laptop power supplies. $20 shipped from Amazon. Sure, they are bulkier than a small wall wart, but that doesn't matter to me. The power regulation is excellent and they don't work hard at all when charging these batteries. I also use "quick charging" ports in various power strips and vehicles if that is convenient. This is becoming so ubiquitous that I rarely use an actual power supply in the field. I do however also carry at least a couple of >20k MAh power bricks that can provide quick charging if necessary.

I think DJI is exactly right in leaving these out of the standard kit, but it could come as a shock if you were expecting one and it wasn't there. Truth is, you can charge the batteries from virtually any USB power source, albeit slowly.
 

I got this one from Amazon. Pricey, but I’m very pleased:​

Anker USB C Charger (GaN II 100W), 3 Port Fast Compact Wall Charger​

Sorry, but couldn’t copy the link - dunno why . . .
 
The last three drones I've purchased from DJI (all with FMCs) did not come with a power supply, but I didn't actually realize it until well after the fact. I placed the battery hubs into my charging area and connected to available power. I didn't even unpack the cords.

What I use mostly nowadays are 65w laptop power supplies. $20 shipped from Amazon. Sure, they are bulkier than a small wall wart, but that doesn't matter to me. The power regulation is excellent and they don't work hard at all when charging these batteries. I also use "quick charging" ports in various power strips and vehicles if that is convenient. This is becoming so ubiquitous that I rarely use an actual power supply in the field. I do however also carry at least a couple of >20k MAh power bricks that can provide quick charging if necessary.

I think DJI is exactly right in leaving these out of the standard kit, but it could come as a shock if you were expecting one and it wasn't there. Truth is, you can charge the batteries from virtually any USB power source, albeit slowly.
I have several of these in service right now.


I originally bought them for use with Thinkpad laptops but they are great for drone batteries also. Less than $14.00 via Prime right now.
 
I was just looking at my various "wall pucks" and I can't find a single one that has "W" on the output. My two main ones both state:
Puck #1
USB-C output: 5V ~ 3A
USB-A output 5V ~2.4A

Puck #2
USB-A output (2x) 5V ~2.4A (total 5V~4.8A)

Unfortunately, those aren't PD chargers. Output on the C channel is 15W (5V×3A), so the M4P will charge rather slowly.

Hey, they were free, and if time isn't an issue then no problem...
 
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I just didn't know enough about the way all these charger work. And I always use DJI products and accessories, just so there are no issues. Thanks to you guys, I am better informed. I also found some interesting articles on PD chargers online. On a side note, I know everybody wants a fast charge so they can get out and fly quicker, but isn't it better to slow charge the batteries if you can for prolonged battery life? I just bought a new Lenovo Legion laptop for editing, and they strongly recommend overnight charge , instead of fast charge. Although I do not know what kind of battery is in it. I am going to check that after I post this. Just asking...
 
As long as we are on the battery topic, how do you feel about the 10 day auto discharge of the DJI batteries? I know DJI is a lot smarter than me, but it just seems too long to me, but what do I know. Your thoughts... Sorry up early, couldn't sleep LOL
 
...but isn't it better to slow charge the batteries if you can for prolonged battery life? I just bought a new Lenovo Legion laptop for editing, and they strongly recommend overnight charge , instead of fast charge. Although I do not know what kind of battery is in it.
What put wear on a battery is heat... & quick charges always generate more heat, if you have the time it's always better to go with the "slow charge" alternative. Laptops always have Lithium batteries & in most cases the Polymer variant, not the Ion (LiPo usually squarish plastic enclosed cells & Li-Ion cylindrical shaped).

...how do you feel about the 10 day auto discharge of the DJI batteries? I know DJI is a lot smarter than me...
Yeah DJI could be smarter, but it's a matter of the goal... do they have 10 days because it's sufficient to get the batteries to last during the 12 month battery warranty... or is it to get the absolutely longest service life?

Lithium batteries always have less wear put on the nominal voltage... fully charged batteries risk electrolyte decomposition which results, among other things, in gassing which makes your batteries swell. Discharged ones risk to self discharge below levels (3.0V/cell) where permanent damage occur. About 48h have always been a good thumb rule for a Lithium battery before it should be returned to nominal voltage... if you aim for a long service life with just a slowly degrading max storage capacity, with a minimized risk for catastrophic cell failures.
 
I know everybody wants a fast charge so they can get out and fly quicker, but isn't it better to slow charge the batteries if you can for prolonged battery life?

Years ago, that was the best advice for charging lipos. In fact, the standard was, and still is C/10, where C is the mAH capacity. So a 4000mAH battery should charge at 400 mA.

However, what's changed significantly in the last 3 years or so is the development of high performance cells that can be charged at much higher rates without significantly degrading their capacity life. These cells can be charged up to C with very little difference in impact vs. routinely charging at C/10.

This is why our batteries, with a powerful enough charger, take about an hour to charge. Pour 4000mA into a battery for an hour and you get 4000mAH of charge.
 
Lots of "sort of on topic" points here for me:

A) If the charge puck says "PD-30US" but doesn't give anything to assume 30W but says, 5v=3A is just a 15W correct?

B) I think 10 days to discharge is too much IMHO. I like the 5-day increment personally. I set up my Departments with the mindset of flying/updating is a better way to "discharge" so they always try to "Use" the charge in some way instead of just letting the internals "short out" the energy. Seems like a waste of energy, a charge, and life to me.

C) I always prefer a "slow/gentle" charge to be easier on the cells but sometimes we "need" to rush things. Older technology didn't really "rush" very well at all and more often than not you would either ruin the battery or create an ignition... Bad very very bad! This is why we charged in Fire Proof scenarios just-in-case.

D) In terms of "Charger Power" are these Mini 3/4 batteries able to "take" more current? Previous DJI batteries had internal circuitry that limited/controlled the charging. Regardless (up to a certain point) how strong the charger was the battery would regulate the current going in and charge rate. Does anyone here have actual DATA to demonstrate increasing the Watts will indeed provide a faster charge on these batteries? I'm not talking about comparing a low watt wall wart to the High Watt units but what about going from a 15W to a 30W or 45W? How much
I'm going order one of the Parallel chargers as I've had GREAT success with them for several years on every single aircraft I've owned. The ability to charge 4 batteries in almost the same amount of time as a single is a HUGE plus when time is critical . . .


This one is only pushing Output: 8.5V/8.6V 8A so it's not really "pushing" the batteries hard but it says the Mini 4 Pro takes 65min so that's not bad at all.
 
Lots of "sort of on topic" points here for me:

A) If the charge puck says "PD-30US" but doesn't give anything to assume 30W but says, 5v=3A is just a 15W correct?

My opinion, but I wouldn't believe labeling that called a fixed-output 5V/3A supply Power Delivery based on PD standards. 5V/3A (which is 15W) is the basic USB charging spec.

B) I think 10 days to discharge is too much IMHO. I like the 5-day increment personally. I set up my Departments with the mindset of flying/updating is a better way to "discharge" so they always try to "Use" the charge in some way instead of just letting the internals "short out" the energy. Seems like a waste of energy, a charge, and life to me.

In your situation where the drones are being used constantly, or more regularly than many hobbiests, that makes a lot of sense.

OTOH a battery that spends the majority of its life stored, I don't think 5 vs. 10 days until auto-discharging makes any meaningful difference.

C) I always prefer a "slow/gentle" charge to be easier on the cells but sometimes we "need" to rush things. Older technology didn't really "rush" very well at all and more often than not you would either ruin the battery or create an ignition... Bad very very bad! This is why we charged in Fire Proof scenarios just-in-case.

Smart 👍🏻 Don't miss out, though, on how much li-ion batteries have advanced. The cells that DJI (and Tesla, Samsung, etc.) are using really are far more tolerant of up to 1C charging rates. It's pretty safe these days, from both a charging catastrophe, as well as damage to cell longevity, to charge at 1C.

Beware, however, that this improvement has also driven the availability of cheap 18650's based on older technology that don't like >0.1C during the Constant Current phase of the charge cycle.


D) In terms of "Charger Power" are these Mini 3/4 batteries able to "take" more current? Previous DJI batteries had internal circuitry that limited/controlled the charging. Regardless (up to a certain point) how strong the charger was the battery would regulate the current going in and charge rate. Does anyone here have actual DATA to demonstrate increasing the Watts will indeed provide a faster charge on these batteries? I'm not talking about comparing a low watt wall wart to the High Watt units but what about going from a 15W to a 30W or 45W? How much
I'm going order one of the Parallel chargers as I've had GREAT success with them for several years on every single aircraft I've owned. The ability to charge 4 batteries in almost the same amount of time as a single is a HUGE plus when time is critical . . .

Remember that a power supply can not force an arbitrary current into a load at a particular voltage. The supply (or charger) presents a voltage to the load, and the load draws whatever current it does at that voltage. Controlling current requires a variable voltage.

So a 100W power supply simply has the capacity to deliver 100W to the load. It can't force a load to draw 100W.

PD was a necessary technical advance to deliver higher power to USB connected devices. The legacy USB spec is 5V and only 5V, so the amount of power that can be delivered over various wire gauges, lengths, etc. – USB cables – is limited by resistive losses, which scale as the current squared. So, double the current and the cable loses 4x as much power through heating than at half the current.

So at 5V, to deliver 100W to a load the cables would have to carry 20A. It would get very hot, and maybe even melt the insulation. OR, it would have to be made of such thick gauge wire so as to be impracticably inflexible and useless.

Enter PD. 100W is delivered to the load by negotiating a voltage that can send that power without frying the cable (and PCB traces, and mosfets, etc.) down at the load. In this case, the load and supply would agree on 20V, and the load would draw 5A, pretty tame.

So why wasn't USB 20V to start? Or 100V?

Safety. Electricity gets more dangerous the higher the voltage. Plugging a USB connector can spark at 20V where it doesn't at 5V. And other safety concerns.
 
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Lots of "sort of on topic" points here for me:

A) If the charge puck says "PD-30US" but doesn't give anything to assume 30W but says, 5v=3A is just a 15W correct?

B) I think 10 days to discharge is too much IMHO. I like the 5-day increment personally. I set up my Departments with the mindset of flying/updating is a better way to "discharge" so they always try to "Use" the charge in some way instead of just letting the internals "short out" the energy. Seems like a waste of energy, a charge, and life to me.

C) I always prefer a "slow/gentle" charge to be easier on the cells but sometimes we "need" to rush things. Older technology didn't really "rush" very well at all and more often than not you would either ruin the battery or create an ignition... Bad very very bad! This is why we charged in Fire Proof scenarios just-in-case.

D) In terms of "Charger Power" are these Mini 3/4 batteries able to "take" more current? Previous DJI batteries had internal circuitry that limited/controlled the charging. Regardless (up to a certain point) how strong the charger was the battery would regulate the current going in and charge rate. Does anyone here have actual DATA to demonstrate increasing the Watts will indeed provide a faster charge on these batteries? I'm not talking about comparing a low watt wall wart to the High Watt units but what about going from a 15W to a 30W or 45W? How much
I'm going order one of the Parallel chargers as I've had GREAT success with them for several years on every single aircraft I've owned. The ability to charge 4 batteries in almost the same amount of time as a single is a HUGE plus when time is critical . . .


This one is only pushing Output: 8.5V/8.6V 8A so it's not really "pushing" the batteries hard but it says the Mini 4 Pro takes 65min so that's not bad at all.
I have this charger in the Air 2s version. so far I've only used it to discharge the batteries, as I feel 10 days auto discharge is too long. but that's just me. When I fly, I don't use a lot of batteries, so I haven't used it to charge all my batts. at once. But I see this would be very useful for you. This co. seems to have a good reputation. Many Air 2s users are using these. I will eventually purchase this as you linked above in the spring. It's already in the cart! LOL
 
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I'll share this again in this thread... I highly recommend getting one of these USB-C power display cables. $22, and you will not regret the spend. Shows volts/amps/watts/total mAH/charge time. And it's accurate.

Answers many questions we all ask around here regularly. Kinda cool to see the Avata batteries pull 65 Watts...

j5create USB-C to USB-C 2.0 Dynamic Power Meter Charging Cable


61BbQx6E4DL.jpg
 
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I was just looking at my various "wall pucks" and I can't find a single one that has "W" on the output. My two main ones both state:
Puck #1
USB-C output: 5V ~ 3A
USB-A output 5V ~2.4A

Puck #2
USB-A output (2x) 5V ~2.4A (total 5V~4.8A)

Since power is just V×A, it was common to leave out power capacity as it's redundant when a fixed voltage supply (5V) is spec'd. Knowing the max current in this case is more useful, to aid in spec'ing cables.

PD throws all that out the window because of variable voltages. This means the max current changes depending on the negotiated voltage, so stamping the capacity on the charger gets a lot more complicated. Still, some do list all the combinations supported... Here's the labeling on a Samsung PD charger that came with a phone:

1000015976.jpg

One last thing I'll mention... We talk a lot in these threads about PD, but there's another mode supported by almost every PD charger that's part of the PD spec: Programmable Power Supply (PPS).

PD 3.1 can deliver power at fixed, discrete voltages, 5/9/12/15/20/28/36/48V. Chargers are not required to supply all those voltages, and most top at 20V.

If the supply supports PPS – and most PD supplies do – a "sink" (the technical term, the supply is a "source") can request a more precise voltage with 0.1V precision, and have that exact voltage delivered. The Samsung above can provide any voltage between 3.3 and 21V in 0.1V increments to a sink using the PPS protocol.

Now that you know that, file it away in long-term memory and forget it. Almost nothing uses PPS, including DJI products. All use PD protocol.

Whew! This is why PD supplies are spec'd in watts. It the only way to compare one to another. It's gotten even more complex with multiport chargers with different limits on different ports (typical example: 100W total capacity, two ports can deliver up to 100W, a third limited to 65W, and a USB-A port capped at 18W).
 
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