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Help with drone registration for Colombia and Chile

JetBrett

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Hi all, would greatly appreciate any local input as to how to solve a couple of challenges.
Firstly, anyone who can advise me what email address to send registration application to for Colombia. I've got all the paperwork ready to go and the only official email i could see was [email protected] which rejected my email (which was without attachments)
Secondly, I have registered as an operator in Chile but it looks like to fly mavic 3 I'd need to qualify as operator there (international quals perhaps not recognised). Would appreciate anyone with good knowledge of Chile as I am sure my spanish translations are leading me astray.
Thanks so much
 
Good luck mate, like you are finding, many try to do the right thing in some of these countries, but it is really really difficult to get the right contact info, processes, all the while navigating some foreign language.

The Mavic 3 would be very handy there, and I imagine (especially Chile) would be quite windy in many areas, I guess those factors might have contributed to your drone of choice.

The Mini models (latest M3P) are designed to get through many countries drone rules easier, as some have the sub 250g classification for lower legislation measures.
Then again, many simply don't allow foreigners to fly any drone classes in their country, and / or make it hard for even the locals too.

I would post a link to this thread in the (link >) General Discussions forum too, as it will be read a lot more over there.
Something like title "Looking for help flying in Columbia / Chile", and a brief message > Upcoming trip to Columbia / Chile, need some info, please see thread Help with drone registration for Colombia and Chile

That link will come up nice and short in your post.

All the best with getting approvals.
Most might try to do the right thing, and if unsuccessful take their drone and fly discretely anyway.
There are risks, some border control in those countries can and do confiscate drones, or if caught fines / penalties can be quite hefty, sometimes official, and sometimes 'not official'.
 
Good luck mate, like you are finding, many try to do the right thing in some of these countries, but it is really really difficult to get the right contact info, processes, all the while navigating some foreign language.

The Mavic 3 would be very handy there, and I imagine (especially Chile) would be quite windy in many areas, I guess those factors might have contributed to your drone of choice.

The Mini models (latest M3P) are designed to get through many countries drone rules easier, as some have the sub 250g classification for lower legislation measures.
Then again, many simply don't allow foreigners to fly any drone classes in their country, and / or make it hard for even the locals too.

I would post a link to this thread in the (link >) General Discussions forum too, as it will be read a lot more over there.
Something like title "Looking for help flying in Columbia / Chile", and a brief message > Upcoming trip to Columbia / Chile, need some info, please see thread Help with drone registration for Colombia and Chile

That link will come up nice and short in your post.

All the best with getting approvals.
Most might try to do the right thing, and if unsuccessful take their drone and fly discretely anyway.
There are risks, some border control in those countries can and do confiscate drones, or if caught fines / penalties can be quite hefty, sometimes official, and sometimes 'not official'.
Thanks for the tips south Aus...have made the pose. I'm definitely a follow the rules kinda pilot, these things are dangerous in the wrong hands.

You are right about it being difficult to get up and running in some countries. Europe seems to be better worked out and once you navigate the licence you can pretty much crack on with it..though Eu fly zones are nuts. In Greece for example I have to file a flight plan for every mission and in some cases are liasing with ATC to coordinate.

I was in SA two weeks ago and flew the drone over the boat i was on the Murray. Weather wasn't great so pics were a bit average but good practise.

Cheers
 
Cheers JetBrett.
There certainly wouldn't be many countries that don't have an airspace regulator.
As with everything in life, some are easy to work with, others can be virtually impossible, making the rules almost insurmountable for drone ops.

Very much like our state and rules for National Park flight.
All but WA, QLD, and to some extent the NT are so anti drone you might as well forget and sort of operations unless you are a reasonable size video production company, or parks staff themselves.

Anyway, good luck here or on the general forum for info, and when you do get somewhere, the nice thing about foums is updating your thread so others down the line get to make life easier in their travels.

I meant to do a quick search on > columbia chile < here on the forum, but forgot.
Just did so, and nothing of consequence came up.
 
Hi! Just to give my two cents on the OP's original question, regarding Chile:
Rules are getting very strict in my country, so in order to be able to fly your drone legally, you basically have very limited options.
Drones must be physically registered with the aviation company (DGAC), under an operator's company (AOC). The pilot has to be registered with a license under the same AOC company.
License has to be approved by an exam that you have to perform physically at DGAC's offices via previous appointment.
This is the simplified explanation, but basically it is virtually imposible to fly foreign drones.
Also, depending on the AOC, you will have to pay them to include them as a pilot under their operators manual, which has to be updated every time a new pilot is added.
Turn around time for such paper work, getting license and registering drone is around a 1,5 months.
 
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Hi! Just to give my two cents on the OP's original question, regarding Chile:
Rules are getting very strict in my country, so in order to be able to fly your drone legally, you basically have very limited options.
Drones must be physically registered with the aviation company (DGAC), under an operator's company (AOC). The pilot has to be registered with a license under the same AOC company.
License has to be approved by an exam that you have to perform physically at DGAC's offices via previous appointment.
This is the simplified explanation, but basically it is virtually imposible to fly foreign drones.
Also, depending on the AOC, you will have to pay them to include them as a pilot under their operators manual, which has to be updated every time a new pilot is added.
Turn around time for such paper work, getting license and registering drone is around a 1,5 months.
I would imagine its "easier" in the Atacama or in Patagonia, far away from civilization? Im planning a trip.

That being said, the situation is similar in other parts of the world if not in most. I dont think you can legally or easily fly anywhere in Africa as a foreigner. And many europeans have found ways to make it technically impossible too although in theory feasible. Darks clouds above everywhere.
 
I would imagine its "easier" in the Atacama or in Patagonia, far away from civilization? Im planning a trip.

That being said, the situation is similar in other parts of the world if not in most. I dont think you can legally or easily fly anywhere in Africa as a foreigner. And many europeans have found ways to make it technically impossible too although in theory feasible. Darks clouds above everywhere.
Yes, "easier" in those places.
Inside national parks, drones are banned. I would advice to be cautious in Torres del Paine NP, if by Patagonia you mean there. They are very strict...
 
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well, do they outright confiscate drones at the airport if you don't have a registration? otherwise it's always possible to fly discreetly in unpopulated areas.
 
I haven't heard of chileans confiscating drones at the airport, yet. So yeah, it its possible to do it discreetly.
I have heard of that in peruvian airports, years ago. Not sure if they still do it.
 
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