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Insane Drone Flying Skills

AnotherMavicPilot

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It was this forum that got me started in FPV flying.

Do you remember that crazy dangerous video of the guy chasing a commercial flight landing near Vegas? Many here said it had to be fake. They said no one could fly like that with a drone. Someone else said that it could easily be done with an FPV drone. I googled it and was amazed at what folks were doing with FPV. I have no interest in chasing planes, but the rest of the sport looked VERY cool. Hence the new equipment purchases have restarted......

It's an entirely different type of flying than the Mavic. My Mavic is all about awesome stable videos and images being within the reach of a novice pilot. FPV (for me) is all about developing crazy flying skills.

I baby and protect my Mavic, yet with my FPV equipment the motto is "Fly, Crash, Repair, Repeat".

I have a small drone (Snapper7) for going nuts in the house. (It's awesome for winter, rainy days, etc) and I'm replacing my now deceased Walkera Rodeo 110 with a Fullspeed Leader 3SE (3" drone) for flying outside.

Some advantages to these over my Mavic are:
  • Neither of these drones is near the FAA registration required weight which is a plus.
  • When I fly near people they don't freak out and think that I'm spying on them. They think of it like a child's toy.
  • I'm completely at ease flying the Snapper7 inside. I wouldn't think of flying my Mavic indoors.
  • I don't tend to fly the Mavic unless there is something that I want to film. I fly the FPV drones just for the fun of actually flying.
  • I now know how to solder about 10,000% better than before. (Trust me, if you get into FPV you will be taking up soldering as a hobby too!)
  • My crash inspired repair work has taught me so much about what actually makes a drone fly. I actually went out and dismantled my Simtoo Dragonfly (a pre Mavic "lets save money" mistake) and rebuilt it on a new carbon fiber frame with my son. We had a blast and it actually flies!
A disadvantage is that I have to remember when flying the Mavic that moving the left stick up doesn't make it go FASTER, it makes it go HIGHER. (Thank goodness for being able to set a 400' altitude limit.....)

It's another fun avenue of this hobby to explore. I have a LONG, LONG, LONG way to go before I will be remotely good at it, but it is a very fun ride! If you haven't tried it, you can get a small indoor drone, a decent controller, and some beginner goggles for about the price of a Spark/Air. You'll have a blast and you can drive your family and pets crazy!

Peter T.
Some really good info here, it's posts like this that help to inspire more people to join the club. Thank you for taking the time to write this up.

I'm now looking at getting myself a Snapper7 Thumbswayup
 

Drone on

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It was this forum that got me started in FPV flying.

Do you remember that crazy dangerous video of the guy chasing a commercial flight landing near Vegas? Many here said it had to be fake. They said no one could fly like that with a drone. Someone else said that it could easily be done with an FPV drone. I googled it and was amazed at what folks were doing with FPV. I have no interest in chasing planes, but the rest of the sport looked VERY cool. Hence the new equipment purchases have restarted......

It's an entirely different type of flying than the Mavic. My Mavic is all about awesome stable videos and images being within the reach of a novice pilot. FPV (for me) is all about developing crazy flying skills.

I baby and protect my Mavic, yet with my FPV equipment the motto is "Fly, Crash, Repair, Repeat".

I have a small drone (Snapper7) for going nuts in the house. (It's awesome for winter, rainy days, etc) and I'm replacing my now deceased Walkera Rodeo 110 with a Fullspeed Leader 3SE (3" drone) for flying outside.

Some advantages to these over my Mavic are:
  • Neither of these drones is near the FAA registration required weight which is a plus.
  • When I fly near people they don't freak out and think that I'm spying on them. They think of it like a child's toy.
  • I'm completely at ease flying the Snapper7 inside. I wouldn't think of flying my Mavic indoors.
  • I don't tend to fly the Mavic unless there is something that I want to film. I fly the FPV drones just for the fun of actually flying.
  • I now know how to solder about 10,000% better than before. (Trust me, if you get into FPV you will be taking up soldering as a hobby too!)
  • My crash inspired repair work has taught me so much about what actually makes a drone fly. I actually went out and dismantled my Simtoo Dragonfly (a pre Mavic "lets save money" mistake) and rebuilt it on a new carbon fiber frame with my son. We had a blast and it actually flies!
A disadvantage is that I have to remember when flying the Mavic that moving the left stick up doesn't make it go FASTER, it makes it go HIGHER. (Thank goodness for being able to set a 400' altitude limit.....)

It's another fun avenue of this hobby to explore. I have a LONG, LONG, LONG way to go before I will be remotely good at it, but it is a very fun ride! If you haven't tried it, you can get a small indoor drone, a decent controller, and some beginner goggles for about the price of a Spark/Air. You'll have a blast and you can drive your family and pets crazy!

Peter T.
Hi Peter...If you have the time, please take a look at these questions
How long have you been flying FPV?
In terms of equipment, where are you at, now? Meaning are you using beginner equipment, intermediate, advanced?
Are you buying your equipment off the shelf, or have you begun to build quadcopters?
How long do the batteries last?
What do you consider the ultimate setup to be?
 

pftarch

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Some really good info here, it's posts like this that help to inspire more people to join the club. Thank you for taking the time to write this up.

I'm now looking at getting myself a Snapper7 Thumbswayup
I enjoy my Snapper7 immensely, but things move fast in the Micro FPV world and there are several newer models out there that you might like more. The Mobula appears to be getting good reviews and it appears to be an upgraded Snapper7. I can't speak to the Mobula directly as I've never flown one, but I can talk about the Snapper7.

(Please bear in mind that the almost all of the "inexpensive" prebuilt micro FPV drones out there have minor or major "issues" and need some type of modification/adjustment after purchase.) I'm very happy with my Snapper 7, and even happier after the following changes/concessions:
  • I put a dab of hot around the camera antenna and where the camera is attached to the canopy. This keeps the camera from jarring loose when I crash.
  • I looped my power cable around a standoff so that if the battery ejects, (from its less than ideal rubber band holder), it doesn't yank the power cable off the board.
  • I taped my receiver antenna to the underside of the frame so it doesn't flop around.
  • The lightweight aluminum prop guards bend in a crash and will jam against the prop. I just gently straighten them out and I've done that about 100 times. They're no longer perfect circles, but it still flies fine.
I know the list above seems like a lot to keep your drone flying when you are used to a DJI product, but, from my experience, it is really par for the course in the prebuilt FPV world. (I know that folks have had issues with DJI products, but every other drone that I have owned seems like a beta prototype when compared to the refinement and quality control that my Mavic has.)

Having said all of the above, I LOVE my Snapper7 and it's flight characteristics are outstanding. I only hesitate slightly to recommend it because I think the new and improved version (Mobula) might be better and costs about the same.

Much like DJI, (and Apple, and Samsung, and Microsoft, and Honda, and Ford....) you make a purchase knowing that in 6 months a better version will always come out.

I'll be making another equipment post shortly so I'd keep my eyes open for that.

Peter T
 
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pftarch

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Hi Peter...If you have the time, please take a look at these questions
How long have you been flying FPV?
In terms of equipment, where are you at, now? Meaning are you using beginner equipment, intermediate, advanced?
Are you buying your equipment off the shelf, or have you begun to build quadcopters?
How long do the batteries last?
What do you consider the ultimate setup to be?
Let's take these one at a time.

How long have you been flying FPV?
I got my first brushed micro FPV drone around Christmas 2017 (I bought myself a present!).

In terms of equipment, where are you at, now? Meaning are you using beginner equipment, intermediate, advanced?
I would say beginner all the way. I live in southern NH which is hilly, moderately developed, and forested where it's not developed. Most of my outdoor flying is limited to my 1/4 acre suburban house lot. I don't have wide open areas nearby to practice so with my present beginner ability level I limit myself to low power equipment.

Are you buying your equipment off the shelf, or have you begun to build quadcopters?
My purchases to date have been either RTF (ready to fly with and included transmitter/remote) or BNF (bind and fly to a remote/transmitter that I provide). Although serious FPV folk will tell you to build your own gear, I'm not quite there yet (other than "rebuilding" my Simtoo on a carbon fiber frame, and it is not a freestyle acro drone). If I go much further in the hobby I will probably build a 3 or 5 inch drone, but time will tell.

How long do the batteries last?
That's hard to say. To date I've updated my drones about every 6-9 months, and every time I get a new one it inevitably takes a different battery. (I now have quite the collection of lithium batteries.....). My 9 month old batteries for my Snapper7 are still going strong after flying them 2 or 3 times a week.

What do you consider the ultimate setup to be?
I'll go through my full equipment list with explanations later in this post, but I am really WAY too new at this to be making a recommendation as to the "ultimate" setup, and my dream list changes on a near daily basis. If you are looking to get into FPV there are some awesome online resources available. Here are some of the ones that have been VERY helpful to me:

RCGroups: Remote Control, Radio Control Planes, Drones, Cars and Boats - Incredible repair advice and reviews on all things RC. I have yet to have a drone that they haven't had posts on.

Drone Racing FPV Forum - Our sister forum here. It's quiet, but it too has been helpful.

UAVfutures - UAV Futures Youtube channel - Great reviews on gear and tutorials on assembly.

Joshua Bardwell - Joshua Bardwells Youtube channel - Josh has incredible reviews and his tutorial series on how to fly FPV using the "Freerider" simulator is a "must do" for beginning pilots. For me, Josh's videos have been THE most valuable tool for learning FPV flight and binding transmitters.

Le Drib - LeDrib's Youtube channel - LeDrib is not only an INCREDIBLE pilot, but he's a hoot to watch. He has some good tutorials and recommendations and general craziness.

Here is my (ever growing) FPV equipment list (in order of purchase):

Arris "Poke" RTF drone. Present cost about $60 on Amazon. This got me started and it was fun and cheap, BUT, unless you are on an EXTREMELY limited budget I wouldn't recommend it to start. It is a lot for what you pay, but, it comes with a remote controller/transmitter (TX) that is pretty bad and you can't easily (if at all) link it to a decent TX. Most "cheap" indoor FPV RTF kits have this problem. I haven't flown this since I got the Snapper7 but it got me started and on my way.

Virhuck LS - 800 goggles. Present cost about $80 on Amazon. I still use these, but again, I can't recommend them. They are an Eachine EV800D knock off (EV800 is about $130 on Amazon and about $80 on Banggood). The charging port of my Virhucks snapped off after about 2 months and I had to cobble together a repair that hangs off the goggles. If I had to do it all over, I would probably buy the Eachines off of Banggood. Please note that presently I am looking to upgrade my goggles, but I am still unsure where to go, and that's ok, because I can't afford them right now anyways.

Walkera Rodeo 110 RTF drone. Present cost about $180 on Amazon. I loved it and it's a lot of kit for the price, but, I wouldn't recommend this either. After about 4 months of beating the living daylights out of this poor drone one motor stopped working. I crashed this thing HARD every time I used it and it kept coming back for more. I was tempted to try and fix it with about $60 worth of parts, but I opted to spend that money on another drone. My reasons for not recommending this are as follows:
  • It is a proprietary system (as DJI owners we are VERY familiar with that....). The Walkera TX that comes with it isn't bad, but it can only be used with other Walkera drones.
  • Although repair parts are available, they too are Walkera and cost more than comparable products.
  • The camera on it is pretty bad.
The Rodeo 110 served me well and I hate not being able to recommend it, but, if I had to do it again I would probably save a little more money and buy a separate TX and a more "universal" drone.

Vuzix iWear goggles with a video receiver (RX). These are no longer available. These were discontinued and I got about $600 worth of goggles and receiver for about $175. They "work" for FPV flying but they are bulky, you have wires and batteries hanging all over the place when you use them for FPV, and it is a digital signal conversion system which goes blank when it gets a weak signal. Fully analog systems just get fuzzy. (Trust me, fuzzy is better than blank when you are flying your drone.) They are fun for watching movies and using as a second display on my computer.

Taranis Q7 transmitter. About $140 on Amazon and $115 on Banggood. Highly recommended. This transmitter can bind with many BNF drones and receivers for its protocol are cheap. It is highly customizable and well made.

Happymodel Snapper7 BNF drone. About $125 on Amazon and $90 on Banggood. I fly this with my Q7. Great drone for inside flying. I like flying it outside, BUT, outside I fly it faster so it crashes harder and I don't want to destroy it. In addition, it doesn't have a beeper and it is small. When I crash it outside is is hard to find, even in my backyard. For now, I try to keep this inside where it is fantastic. Although I love this, when I bought it the Mobula7 wasn't available. If I had to buy it today I would probably buy the Mobula7, BUT, as I haven't flown it I can't outright recommend it.

FullspeedRC Leader 3SE BNF drone. About $280 on Amazon and $140 on the FullspeedRC site. This is going to be my outdoor drone if and when it ever makes it to me from China. It has good reviews but as I haven't flown it I can't tell you firsthand how good it is. This drone highlights one of the downfalls of FPV purchasing. If you want it fast on Amazon, you will pay more, sometimes SIGNIFICANTLY more. If you buy it directly from China (which often is the only option) shipping takes weeks or months (especially during Chinese New Years). I've purchased from Banggood and Gearbest and, so far, it has gone well aside from slow shipping times. However, getting customer support from China is an adventure at best.

For a "cheap" beginner setup I would say get the Taranis Q7, the Mobula7 (assuming the reviews are true), the Eachine goggles, and some extra batteries. Total cost about $375. If I were to upgrade any part of this I would aim for the goggles. Most people that fly FPV seriously are using Fatshark goggles and those cost between $300 and $400 dollars, but, the general consensus is that you don't crash your goggles so spend big on them. I am leaning toward these, but time will tell. (I'm also looking at the DJI Goggles RE, but there are FPV compromises there as well.)

"Ultimately" I see myself with the Taranis Q7, a custom built 3 or 5 inch drone, and Fatshark or comparable goggles. Total cost with batteries about $1000 for everything (and I already have the Taranis so it would be less for me). I'm anxious to see how the Leader 3SE works out as it may be all I need going forward.

It's a long post but I hope that it helps you out. FPV is a great deal of fun!

Peter T
 

AnotherMavicPilot

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I enjoy my Snapper7 immensely, but things move fast in the Micro FPV world and there are several newer models out there that you might like more. The Mobula appears to be getting good reviews and it appears to be an upgraded Snapper7. I can't speak to the Mobula directly as I've never flown one, but I can talk about the Snapper7.

(Please bear in mind that the almost all of the "inexpensive" prebuilt micro FPV drones out there have minor or major "issues" and need some type of modification/adjustment after purchase.) I'm very happy with my Snapper 7, and even happier after the following changes/concessions:
  • I put a dab of hot around the camera antenna and where the camera is attached to the canopy. This keeps the camera from jarring loose when I crash.
  • I looped my power cable around a standoff so that if the battery ejects, (from its less than ideal rubber band holder), it doesn't yank the power cable off the board.
  • I taped my receiver antenna to the underside of the frame so it doesn't flop around.
  • The lightweight aluminum prop guards bend in a crash and will jam against the prop. I just gently straighten them out and I've done that about 100 times. They're no longer perfect circles, but it still flies fine.
I know the list above seems like a lot to keep your drone flying when you are used to a DJI product, but, from my experience, it is really par for the course in the prebuilt FPV world. (I know that folks have had issues with DJI products, but every other drone that I have owned seems like a beta prototype when compared to the refinement and quality control that my Mavic has.)

Having said all of the above, I LOVE my Snapper7 and it's flight characteristics are outstanding. I only hesitate slightly to recommend it because I think the new and improved version (Mobula) might be better and costs about the same.

Much like DJI, (and Apple, and Samsung, and Microsoft, and Honda, and Ford....) you make a purchase knowing that in 6 months a better version will always come out.

I'll be making another equipment post shortly so I'd keep my eyes open for that.

Peter T
Thanks, Peter. Again some really great info here. Thanks for sharing Thumbswayup

Now looking at the Mobula, looks a nice bit of kit and a decent price too.
 

Drone on

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Let's take these one at a time.

How long have you been flying FPV?
I got my first brushed micro FPV drone around Christmas 2017 (I bought myself a present!).

In terms of equipment, where are you at, now? Meaning are you using beginner equipment, intermediate, advanced?
I would say beginner all the way. I live in southern NH which is hilly, moderately developed, and forested where it's not developed. Most of my outdoor flying is limited to my 1/4 acre suburban house lot. I don't have wide open areas nearby to practice so with my present beginner ability level I limit myself to low power equipment.

Are you buying your equipment off the shelf, or have you begun to build quadcopters?
My purchases to date have been either RTF (ready to fly with and included transmitter/remote) or BNF (bind and fly to a remote/transmitter that I provide). Although serious FPV folk will tell you to build your own gear, I'm not quite there yet (other than "rebuilding" my Simtoo on a carbon fiber frame, and it is not a freestyle acro drone). If I go much further in the hobby I will probably build a 3 or 5 inch drone, but time will tell.

How long do the batteries last?
That's hard to say. To date I've updated my drones about every 6-9 months, and every time I get a new one it inevitably takes a different battery. (I now have quite the collection of lithium batteries.....). My 9 month old batteries for my Snapper7 are still going strong after flying them 2 or 3 times a week.

What do you consider the ultimate setup to be?
I'll go through my full equipment list with explanations later in this post, but I am really WAY too new at this to be making a recommendation as to the "ultimate" setup, and my dream list changes on a near daily basis. If you are looking to get into FPV there are some awesome online resources available. Here are some of the ones that have been VERY helpful to me:

RCGroups: Remote Control, Radio Control Planes, Drones, Cars and Boats - Incredible repair advice and reviews on all things RC. I have yet to have a drone that they haven't had posts on.

Drone Racing FPV Forum - Our sister forum here. It's quiet, but it too has been helpful.

UAVfutures - UAV Futures Youtube channel - Great reviews on gear and tutorials on assembly.

Joshua Bardwell - Joshua Bardwells Youtube channel - Josh has incredible reviews and his tutorial series on how to fly FPV using the "Freerider" simulator is a "must do" for beginning pilots. For me, Josh's videos have been THE most valuable tool for learning FPV flight and binding transmitters.

Le Drib - LeDrib's Youtube channel - LeDrib is not only an INCREDIBLE pilot, but he's a hoot to watch. He has some good tutorials and recommendations and general craziness.

Here is my (ever growing) FPV equipment list (in order of purchase):

Arris "Poke" RTF drone. Present cost about $60 on Amazon. This got me started and it was fun and cheap, BUT, unless you are on an EXTREMELY limited budget I wouldn't recommend it to start. It is a lot for what you pay, but, it comes with a remote controller/transmitter (TX) that is pretty bad and you can't easily (if at all) link it to a decent TX. Most "cheap" indoor FPV RTF kits have this problem. I haven't flown this since I got the Snapper7 but it got me started and on my way.

Virhuck LS - 800 goggles. Present cost about $80 on Amazon. I still use these, but again, I can't recommend them. They are an Eachine EV800D knock off (EV800 is about $130 on Amazon and about $80 on Banggood). The charging port of my Virhucks snapped off after about 2 months and I had to cobble together a repair that hangs off the goggles. If I had to do it all over, I would probably buy the Eachines off of Banggood. Please note that presently I am looking to upgrade my goggles, but I am still unsure where to go, and that's ok, because I can't afford them right now anyways.

Walkera Rodeo 110 RTF drone. Present cost about $180 on Amazon. I loved it and it's a lot of kit for the price, but, I wouldn't recommend this either. After about 4 months of beating the living daylights out of this poor drone one motor stopped working. I crashed this thing HARD every time I used it and it kept coming back for more. I was tempted to try and fix it with about $60 worth of parts, but I opted to spend that money on another drone. My reasons for not recommending this are as follows:
  • It is a proprietary system (as DJI owners we are VERY familiar with that....). The Walkera TX that comes with it isn't bad, but it can only be used with other Walkera drones.
  • Although repair parts are available, they too are Walkera and cost more than comparable products.
  • The camera on it is pretty bad.
The Rodeo 110 served me well and I hate not being able to recommend it, but, if I had to do it again I would probably save a little more money and buy a separate TX and a more "universal" drone.

Vuzix iWear goggles with a video receiver (RX). These are no longer available. These were discontinued and I got about $600 worth of goggles and receiver for about $175. They "work" for FPV flying but they are bulky, you have wires and batteries hanging all over the place when you use them for FPV, and it is a digital signal conversion system which goes blank when it gets a weak signal. Fully analog systems just get fuzzy. (Trust me, fuzzy is better than blank when you are flying your drone.) They are fun for watching movies and using as a second display on my computer.

Taranis Q7 transmitter. About $140 on Amazon and $115 on Banggood. Highly recommended. This transmitter can bind with many BNF drones and receivers for its protocol are cheap. It is highly customizable and well made.

Happymodel Snapper7 BNF drone. About $125 on Amazon and $90 on Banggood. I fly this with my Q7. Great drone for inside flying. I like flying it outside, BUT, outside I fly it faster so it crashes harder and I don't want to destroy it. In addition, it doesn't have a beeper and it is small. When I crash it outside is is hard to find, even in my backyard. For now, I try to keep this inside where it is fantastic. Although I love this, when I bought it the Mobula7 wasn't available. If I had to buy it today I would probably buy the Mobula7, BUT, as I haven't flown it I can't outright recommend it.

FullspeedRC Leader 3SE BNF drone. About $280 on Amazon and $140 on the FullspeedRC site. This is going to be my outdoor drone if and when it ever makes it to me from China. It has good reviews but as I haven't flown it I can't tell you firsthand how good it is. This drone highlights one of the downfalls of FPV purchasing. If you want it fast on Amazon, you will pay more, sometimes SIGNIFICANTLY more. If you buy it directly from China (which often is the only option) shipping takes weeks or months (especially during Chinese New Years). I've purchased from Banggood and Gearbest and, so far, it has gone well aside from slow shipping times. However, getting customer support from China is an adventure at best.

For a "cheap" beginner setup I would say get the Taranis Q7, the Mobula7 (assuming the reviews are true), the Eachine goggles, and some extra batteries. Total cost about $375. If I were to upgrade any part of this I would aim for the goggles. Most people that fly FPV seriously are using Fatshark goggles and those cost between $300 and $400 dollars, but, the general consensus is that you don't crash your goggles so spend big on them. I am leaning toward these, but time will tell. (I'm also looking at the DJI Goggles RE, but there are FPV compromises there as well.)

"Ultimately" I see myself with the Taranis Q7, a custom built 3 or 5 inch drone, and Fatshark or comparable goggles. Total cost with batteries about $1000 for everything (and I already have the Taranis so it would be less for me). I'm anxious to see how the Leader 3SE works out as it may be all I need going forward.

It's a long post but I hope that it helps you out. FPV is a great deal of fun!

Peter T
Wow!

Thank you for this thorough and thoughtful reply
 

LetsGoDevs11

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Yeah I'm still humbled by Liftoff - some days I despair of getting there...
Got 2 5" quads in the works...
Same, I can get around ok, but I'm still way behind these guys ripping on YouTube lol. I just have a little XJB-145 and a Mobula 7 I fly/crash around my yard.
 

pftarch

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Same, I can get around ok, but I'm still way behind these guys ripping on YouTube lol. I just have a little XJB-145 and a Mobula 7 I fly/crash around my yard.
How do you like the Mobula, and the XJB?
 

LetsGoDevs11

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How do you like the Mobula, and the XJB?
The Mobula flies great, but the frame is very brittle. I have broken it and reglued it so many times now... I'm just going to get the BetaFPV 75 frame and be done wiht it. I've heard that frame is so much more durable.

The XJB is my favorite quad I own. Very fast, very agile, and very durable. The price is not bad either. For about $185 you can't beat it. If you ever get a chance to fly one take it, there is no other feeling like a racing drone. The XJB is fast for a 3-incher as well, tops out at about 85 on 4S. It still amazes me how quick it moves every time I fly it. The only part I wish was better is the camera capability. If only GoPro made something the size of a Mobius cam. The 3 inchers cannot carry a large HD cam, so you are limited to either one of those cheap SQ chinese cams or pay $80 for a Mobius and hope you get an authentic model. I'm going to get the Mobius at some point, but the dealers for it are all so sketchy. I would hate to get a fake product...
 

pftarch

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The Mobula flies great, but the frame is very brittle. I have broken it and reglued it so many times now... I'm just going to get the BetaFPV 75 frame and be done wiht it. I've heard that frame is so much more durable.

The XJB is my favorite quad I own. Very fast, very agile, and very durable. The price is not bad either. For about $185 you can't beat it. If you ever get a chance to fly one take it, there is no other feeling like a racing drone. The XJB is fast for a 3-incher as well, tops out at about 85 on 4S. It still amazes me how quick it moves every time I fly it. The only part I wish was better is the camera capability. If only GoPro made something the size of a Mobius cam. The 3 inchers cannot carry a large HD cam, so you are limited to either one of those cheap SQ chinese cams or pay $80 for a Mobius and hope you get an authentic model. I'm going to get the Mobius at some point, but the dealers for it are all so sketchy. I would hate to get a fake product...
That's a bummer about the Mobula7. Like I said above, it seems like we are all we are all beta testing prototypes when it comes to prebuilt micro drones.

Have you looked into the Caddx Turtle v2 for the camera? Here is a YouTube review on it:


Thanks for your input on the Mobula!

Peter T
 

LetsGoDevs11

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That's a bummer about the Mobula7. Like I said above, it seems like we are all we are all beta testing prototypes when it comes to prebuilt micro drones.

Have you looked into the Caddx Turtle v2 for the camera? Here is a YouTube review on it:


Thanks for your input on the Mobula!

Peter T
I have recently starting looking into it. Footage looks great, so that may be another option. Cheaper than mobius and I like how it would be protected within the frame too.
 

timlyg

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Are these all home made drones? some of their specs are out of this world.
 

LetsGoDevs11

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Maryland, USA
Are these all home made drones? some of their specs are out of this world.
You can get RTF and BNF racers. They're generally not as good of quality or overpriced compared to most home made, but building is certainly not the only option. I've never built one, but have always wanted to. I have only done some modifications to my BNF. There are a few videos out there on how to make one for $100 though. UAVFutures and Tronage both have good step by step build videos.