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ND Filters Best Video and Camera Setting - Need Help

Xyquil

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I had my Mavic Pro for a couple of months now and been flying for awhile without ND Filters. I need help especially on Video and Camera Settings. And what filter to use for cloudy, sunny and night flight. Please link any sample of your best footage with filters. Thanks in advance
 

msinger

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And what filter to use for cloudy, sunny and night flight.
Here's a general guide:

Filter-Use-Chart.png

When shooting photos, you'll be able to get good photos in most cases when shooting in auto mode with no filter on the camera.
 

sonof40

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And only if motion blur is important to you which it will be in more cases than not.
 

Xyquil

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Hi. What about VIDEO settings like WHITE BALANCE, STYLE and COLOR when ND Filter is on?
 
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sonof40

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Those should not be affected by ND filters.
 

m0nk3y

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The best advice I found to follow was use manual settings for the shutter speed (2x frame rate) so I normally shoot 25 frames a second and run my shutter speed at 50. Then the ev setting is my indication for whether I need an ND filter or not. If the ev setting in manual is displaying a negative number then I need to try an ND filter to bring that as close to zero as possible. The ev setting in manual is indicating the amount of compensation the camera is doing to manage the manual settings... At least that's how I understand it...

It's like the little helper telling you it's too bright or not bright enough. The ND filter should allow you to run the ev setting closer to zero during day time and get a nice depth of color while enjoying that magic cinematography shutter ratio of 2x frame rate.
 
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PalmettoAerial

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The best advice I found to follow was use manual settings for the shutter speed (2x frame rate) so I normally shoot 25 frames a second and run my shutter speed at 50. Then the ev setting is my indication for whether I need an ND filter or not. If the ev setting in manual is displaying a negative number then I need to try an ND filter to bring that as close to zero as possible. The ev setting in manual is indicating the amount of compensation the camera is doing to manage the manual settings... At least that's how I understand it...

It's like the little helper telling you it's too bright or not bright enough. The ND filter should allow you to run the ev setting closer to zero during day time and get a nice depth of color while enjoying that magic cinematography shutter ratio of 2x frame rate.

Can you expand on this?


I have the polar pro cinematic 6 pack and I am unsure when to use them and which one ...
 

m0nk3y

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I'm only just marginally more knowledgeable than you about how to use them, but I did find this YouTube clip very helpful and clear.


The key take away is that by reducing the light reaching the camera, you allow the 'magic' amount of motion blur to be captured on each image (the double the framerate relationship)

This is a widely accepted starting point for film as far as I understand. Of course, adjusting the framerate relationship can create different effects on film but this is where to start from. What this means is that you want the sensor 'E.V.' setting to be as close to zero -this means you are capturing the largest color/light range possible with your drone sensor. So, within your Polar Pro pack you have 3 or 4 ND filters normally at ND 4, 8, 16 & 32 (bigger numbers means it lets in less light) a Polarized filter and a UV filter. The last two I don't really use or know how to use much. I think the polarized filter allows you to film water with more clarity because it prevents light reflections from the water from bouncing back into the light sensor.

Hope that helps get you started.
 
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noogadrone

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The best advice I found to follow was use manual settings for the shutter speed (2x frame rate) so I normally shoot 25 frames a second and run my shutter speed at 50. Then the ev setting is my indication for whether I need an ND filter or not. If the ev setting in manual is displaying a negative number then I need to try an ND filter to bring that as close to zero as possible. The ev setting in manual is indicating the amount of compensation the camera is doing to manage the manual settings... At least that's how I understand it...

It's like the little helper telling you it's too bright or not bright enough. The ND filter should allow you to run the ev setting closer to zero during day time and get a nice depth of color while enjoying that magic cinematography shutter ratio of 2x frame rate.
This! Set up the ISO, frame rate, and exposure. Then break out the ND filters to swap them around to get a properly exposed shot. You can try to get to EV0 using the exposure meter or look at the histogram to make sure you're not clipping any lights or darks. I almost never use a filter for stills - sometimes a polarizer when I'm flying over water.
 

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