Welcome Mavic Pilot!
Jump in and join our free DJI Mavic community today!
Sign up

Mavic Compass /GPS Calibration Problems -Fixed?

Davros007

Active Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
15
Age
45
Location
Western Australia
Put it this way:
First part of compass calibration is on the yaw axis with AC in normal flight position.
Second part of calibration is in roll axis with AC pointed up as if it were a rocket. Pointing down should also be OK.

Some do the rotations by spinning themselves with the AC held out in their arms. That's not the best approach.
Interesting. The picture in Go4 shows the mavic first ‘flat’ then on its side. NOT pointing up or down. But the text says ‘vertical’. Which implies up or down Like you say! Is the picture wrong?
 

Davros007

Active Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
15
Age
45
Location
Western Australia
Put it this way:
First part of compass calibration is on the yaw axis with AC in normal flight position.
Second part of calibration is in roll axis with AC pointed up as if it were a rocket. Pointing down should also be OK.

Some do the rotations by spinning themselves with the AC held out in their arms. That's not the best approach.
Yep, YouTube guys also does it ‘flat’ then ‘sideways’ like the picture shows. Not pointing camera up or down...
 

Davros007

Active Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
15
Age
45
Location
Western Australia
Yep, YouTube guys also does it ‘flat’ then ‘sideways’ like the picture shows. Not pointing camera up or down...
So, I get a mavic version of this. Couldn’t be bothered firing mine up to get it but it’s the same for ‘stage 2’:B5A31114-E9E8-4001-BE49-CFC148090967.png
 

Davros007

Active Member
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
34
Reaction score
15
Age
45
Location
Western Australia
Put it this way:
First part of compass calibration is on the yaw axis with AC in normal flight position.
Second part of calibration is in roll axis with AC pointed up as if it were a rocket. Pointing down should also be OK.

Some do the rotations by spinning themselves with the AC held out in their arms. That's not the best approach.
And here (newest Spark version for stage two)7EFD0708-227E-41B3-92C4-AB1331B1862A.png
 

kidroc

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2017
Messages
523
Reaction score
190
Age
43
My mavic has always been pretty darn accurate on Ruth landings even through all the updating that used to be all the time.. glad your fixed man.
 

WithTheBirds

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2018
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
1,063
Put it this way:
First part of compass calibration is on the yaw axis with AC in normal flight position.
Second part of calibration is in roll axis with AC pointed up as if it were a rocket. Pointing down should also be OK.

Some do the rotations by spinning themselves with the AC held out in their arms. That's not the best approach.
Not "best" approach why? If it comes down to your personal preference as the consideration that is irrelevant.
 

sar104

Dic mihi solum facta, domina.
Premium Pilot
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
8,645
Reaction score
9,608
Location
Los Alamos, NM
Not "best" approach why? If it comes down to your personal preference as the consideration that is irrelevant.
The disadvantage of rotating while holding the aircraft at arms length is that the magnetometers are not simply rotating in the external field - they are also translating. If the external field is uniform then that won't matter, but it introduces the risk of varying the external field that the calibration algorithm assumes to be constant.
 
  • Like
Reactions: WithTheBirds

WithTheBirds

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2018
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
1,063
The disadvantage of rotating while holding the aircraft at arms length is that the magnetometers are not simply rotating in the external field - they are also translating. If the external field is uniform then that won't matter, but it introduces the risk of varying the external field that the calibration algorithm assumes to be constant.
We should expect a reasonably uniform field if the calibration is performed in an appropriate location though shouldn’t we? At least good enough to allow for any contribution of ferromagnetic components forming part of the drone. That is, as I understand it, the intent of calibration. I have experienced the effect of calibrating in a poor environment (over reinforced concrete cricket pitch being one example) and expect both methods may have had similar, if not identical, outcomes.
 

sar104

Dic mihi solum facta, domina.
Premium Pilot
Joined
May 27, 2017
Messages
8,645
Reaction score
9,608
Location
Los Alamos, NM
We should expect a reasonably uniform field if the calibration is performed in an appropriate location though shouldn’t we? At least good enough to allow for any contribution of ferromagnetic components forming part of the drone. That is, as I understand it, the intent of calibration. I have experienced the effect of calibrating in a poor environment (over reinforced concrete cricket pitch being one example) and expect both methods may have had similar, if not identical, outcomes.
Yes - in most locations it should make no difference at all.
 

WithTheBirds

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 2, 2018
Messages
1,923
Reaction score
1,063
T
Yes - in most locations it should make no difference at all.
Thanks SAR. That’s is simply my point.

I have come a long way from when I believed calibration needed to be performed before every flight and then when travelling to allow for changes in magnetic north position.

For practical purposes what ever personal preference people may have as to how they perform the chicken dance is irrelevant. If there is a localised corruption in the natural magnetic field where you choose to calibrate you will potentially have problems regardless of method.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sar104
DJI Drone Service

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
73,597
Messages
852,553
Members
100,773
Latest member
UKdroner