DJI Mavic, Air and Mini Drones
Friendly, Helpful & Knowledgeable Community
Join Us Now

Part 107 pilots who also fly manned aircraft, is the written exam similar to the written for your private pilots license?

Evmoius

Well-Known Member
Joined
Dec 3, 2019
Messages
76
Reactions
147
Age
43
Location
CA
I've had my private pilots license since 2002 but haven't used it in years due to cost and just not having enough time.

I'm curious how similar the written tests are. I remember doing the mandatory ground school, but mostly studying the question bank leading up to the exam. I remember it being not too bad, I only missed one.

I've been flying drones of all types for almost a decade now and would like the option to make some extra cash.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LoudThunder
In my experience it was useful to have had the knowledge from my private pilot training. The airspace and weather questions are basically the same. But you also need to know the drone specific part 107 rules. I did do an on-line course, after which the test was very easy.
 
It was "similar" but not in a big manner at all. It's very "Drone Centric" and common sense doesn't really come into play at all since there's not "Hands On" portion of the exam.

It's much better to "Learn the subject matter" rather than "studying to pass the test" although you can tell by the questions we see on here many people purely study to "pass the test".
 
Then there’s the question of how much of the information you learned back in 2002 you still retain. I took my 107 test 1.5 years ago and am planning on spending the winter reviewing the information. Then again, you’re not nearly my age. Sometimes my brain leaks! 🙀
 
It was easier as I recall, but it was also "open book," meaning you could refer back to the 107 regs while taking the exam. Not sure if that's changed, but back in 2019 when I took it, I spent about 3 total hours from the time I decided to take the test passing it. Good luck!
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
It was easier as I recall, but it was also "open book," meaning you could refer back to the 107 regs while taking the exam. Not sure if that's changed, but back in 2019 when I took it, I spent about 3 total hours from the time I decided to take the test passing it. Good luck!
The trust exam is open book. The 107 exam is distinctly not now. You have to go to one of those test centers where you empty your pockets to enter and do the test on their computer (same places that do professional certification exams, etc.).
 
  • Like
Reactions: LoudThunder
I did mine all online, then print the certificate and bring to a CFI.
Activities, Courses, Seminars & Webinars - Course Overview - FAA - FAASTeam - FAASafety.govHere's the link for the course, you have to have a current BFR though.

Doing it this way, it was pretty much drone specific. I'm a current pilot, so I figured, if the FAA is gonna make it this simple for me to get my Part 107, I might as well do it.
That sounds like the ticket for sure. Unfortunately, I'm not current right now.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
It was easier as I recall, but it was also "open book," meaning you could refer back to the 107 regs while taking the exam. Not sure if that's changed, but back in 2019 when I took it, I spent about 3 total hours from the time I decided to take the test passing it. Good luck!
Good to know thanks!
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
The trust exam is open book. The 107 exam is distinctly not now. You have to go to one of those test centers where you empty your pockets to enter and do the test on their computer (same places that do professional certification exams, etc.).
Thanks for the info!
 
  • Like
Reactions: LoudThunder
If you want to know what the Part 107 Exam questions are like, log onto the FAA web page and take the FREE Part 107 Recurrent Training Course.

https://www.faa.gov/newsroom/recurrent-training-courses-drone-pilots-available-online

But my take on just passing is like the folks who do not ever open the Driver's License Learner's Book put out by the DMV and they somehow manage to guess their way to a passing score. They do not know the rules of the road, but they have their driver's license.
 
I let my private pilot license lapse in the '80s It was getting expensive to fly ( it was about $30 an hour to rent a Cessna 182...wet) and I bought a house and got married...silly me . I took the Pilot Institute course, and besides watching videos on line I probably spent about 40 hours studying for the 107 .....I was surprise how much I had forgotten in almost 40 years, and I was glad to relearn it all....the course covers a lot of stuff that pertains more to flying small aircraft than drones ...like weather, reading sectionals and being able to read the "traffic signs" around a runway....all of which was on the test.....I took the 107 as something to do....if you are doing it with the thoughts that you are going to make money.....you may want to reconsider.....I haven't looked around, but have read a lot that indicates there is just not that much demand for 107 Pilots and their drones.
 
I'll leave it to others to chime in on whether making money is realistic. But there are other reasons to get your 107, since for example if your neighbor asks you to check out their roof, theoretically the FAA can claim that no longer qualifies for the recreational exception. I've taken some video for a local not-for-profit at their request, and that probably would not have been OK under the recreational exception either. Chances of getting caught are low, but I feel better having the certificate.
 
Like Paint Rock, our church as well as others, have asked me for aerials, and even though it wasn’t for profit, it still requires a 107. As it turns out, I have had a few realtor jobs come my way also. With the 1 07, I’m prepared.
 
With the 1 07, I’m prepared.
I got my Part 107 just so I could fly in my back yard. I live in a FAA Zero Altitude Quadrant because Langley AFB is so close by. I call my yard a "Drone Taxi Zone..." but once I acquired my part 107, I had no problem getting an FAA Authorization to fly all over… In fact, almost all over my home turf is Controlled Airspace, requiring an FAA Authorization or a LAANC Authorization… Besides letting me fly, I get to fly high (400' over an obstacle), and I can get an LAANC Night Flying Authorization (Rec pilots cannot…)…

Home Map with Warnings.jpg
 
  • Like
Reactions: Dbez1
With the prices of rentals these days I don't blame on not keeping current
Yeah, I was looking to get back at it but, geez $$$.

It feels like the only way to realistically do it is go in on a plane with several people and make sure that thing is getting rented every day.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Yeah, I was looking to get back at it but, geez $$$.

It feels like the only way to realistically do it is go in on a plane with several people and make sure that thing is getting rented every day.
Or maybe a flying club. I went commercial rotorcraft and just made a career out of it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LoudThunder
About a quarter or a fifth of the test are drone-specific questions, including one or two that I had never seen before in any of the study that I had done. With a private ticket, you should have no problem with weather or chart questions which comprise most of the rest of the test.
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Like Paint Rock, our church as well as others, have asked me for aerials, and even though it wasn’t for profit, it still requires a 107. As it turns out, I have had a few realtor jobs come my way also. With the 1 07, I’m prepared.

Now I'm feeling my inner @mavic3usa start to twitch (said with 100% pure friendly ribbing 🙂).

How does that violate the recreational exception? Seems like that's simply taking pictures for a friend.
 
Lycus Tech Mavic Air 3 Case

DJI Drone Deals

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
130,113
Messages
1,549,409
Members
159,170
Latest member
Dejana