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Part 107

KBF

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At some point, I'd like to get part 107 under my belt. I realise it's an in person test but is it a 'sudden death' deal? Pay your money, fail the test, lose your money ... or can you re-sit the test at a later date?
And is it a 'common sense ' test or should I go for a paid course like the 'pilot institute' one to learn regulations etc, chapter and verse?
My memory for "chapter x, sub section y" stuff isn't too hot these days!
 
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There are ways to study w/o paying. But since you said you don't the learn and regurgitate ability these days (I'm in the same boat), I highly recommend @pilotinstitute. You literally can't go wrong with them. Worse case scenario you fail, they pay for your retest.

And out of the 10s of 1000s of people who have taken the 107 test after studying at PI, I believe only about 45 have failed.

Greg and crew teach you have to learn what you need, not memorize for the test. They care about this industry.

And to naser your first question, no, it is not a "common sense" test. There are a lot of airspace and regulatory questions.
 
I spent a couple of months part-time studying for the exam. I used a variety of free and purchased materials, and I also used Remote Pilot 101 to fine tune my knowledge. When I took the test, I was nervous, but confident, and I passed without a problem. Be sure to know airspace, FAA regs, weather patterns, airport operations, etc.
 
At some point, I'd like to get part 107 under my belt. I realise it's an in person test but is it a 'sudden death' deal? Pay your money, fail the test, lose your money ... or can you re-sit the test at a later date?
And is it a 'common sense ' test or should I go for a paid course like the 'pilot institute' one to learn regulations etc, chapter and verse?
My memory for "chapter x, sub section y" stuff isn't too hot these days!
The test consists of 60 multiple-choice questions, which you will be allotted two hours to complete. The minimum passing score is 70%, so you can get a few (18 !!!) wrong and still pass.
 
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Vic is correct. I hadn’t taken a test in well over 50 years and, after the PI course, passed with an extremely high score. I’m not bragging, I’m just telling you how well prepared you’ll be after taking the course. Additionally, I’m a safer pilot now because of it.
 
At some point, I'd like to get part 107 under my belt. I realise it's an in person test but is it a 'sudden death' deal? Pay your money, fail the test, lose your money ... or can you re-sit the test at a later date?
And is it a 'common sense ' test or should I go for a paid course like the 'pilot institute' one to learn regulations etc, chapter and verse?
My memory for "chapter x, sub section y" stuff isn't too hot these days!
If you can afford it, take the class. It is not an easy test, and if you fail, you must wait two weeks, pay again, and take the test. And just to be clear, it is not easy. Even though people make out it is, it is not.
 
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At some point, I'd like to get part 107 under my belt. I realise it's an in person test but is it a 'sudden death' deal? Pay your money, fail the test, lose your money ... or can you re-sit the test at a later date?
And is it a 'common sense ' test or should I go for a paid course like the 'pilot institute' one to learn regulations etc, chapter and verse?
My memory for "chapter
If you have $60.00, sign up for Gleim remote pilot test prep. It includes real testing that duplicates the real experience.
It will identify knowledge areas of weakness and where to locate the information to overcome the knowledge weakness. Once you are getting 95% go sit for the test without fear you will not pass. If you have outstanding questions about material, you can always go to local airport and grab 30 min from a CFI for 40.00 or go to forum to shoot your question. Although be careful since there is a lot of miss information by accident on forums. There is no substitute to live and in person training, but that cost more $$. All my students spend time with Gleim before me. I teach First responders, PD and FD. It works well with that group. They are not naturally aviators so the subject matter is very foreign. Out of 1000's of students we have not had any failures. Most go from start to finish in less than 4 weeks.
x, sub section y" stuff isn't too hot these days!
 
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Out of curiosity, I looked at that link. They're advertising a temporary price reduction to $14.99. Regardless of what route you choose, this looks like a bargain as a supplemental resource.


View attachment 171183

There's a pretty big difference, IMO, between "pass the test" and "actually learning something" classes.

Teaching to the test is one thing - if all you care about is the piece of paper, I suppose this is fine.

But I can say - I took the Pilot Institute class and found it worth every single penny of the $150. Sure, it prepped me for the test. But that's not really where the value lies. The value is that I passed the test because I learned. I actually became a better remote pilot because of what those classes taught. I'm even a better airline passenger now - have a much better understanding of what's going on around me, and most importantly, the weather conditions.

Really, the PI class punches so far beyond its weight ... Some of the very best $150 I've ever spent.
 
There's a pretty big difference, IMO, between "pass the test" and "actually learning something" classes.

Teaching to the test is one thing - if all you care about is the piece of paper, I suppose this is fine.

But I can say - I took the Pilot Institute class and found it worth every single penny of the $150. Sure, it prepped me for the test. But that's not really where the value lies. The value is that I passed the test because I learned. I actually became a better remote pilot because of what those classes taught. I'm even a better airline passenger now - have a much better understanding of what's going on around me, and most importantly, the weather conditions.

Really, the PI class punches so far beyond its weight ... Some of the very best $150 I've ever spent.
I wasn't suggesting it was an either/or decision.

I'm a big advocate of the Pilot Institute, though I did not use their course to prep for my Part 107 exam. I used at least a dozen different sources to build on what I remembered from my Part 61 power and glider days. If I had been starting from scratch, I'd have used the Pilot Institute course.

In any case, the $15 resource looks like it would certainly be well worthwhile as a supplement to whatever study and prep route someone took.
 
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I wasn't suggesting it was an either/or decision.

I'm a big advocate of the Pilot Institute, though I did not use their course to prep for my Part 107 exam. I used at least a dozen different sources to build on what I remembered from my Part 61 power and glider days. If I had been starting from scratch, I'd have used the Pilot Institute course.

In any case, the $15 resource looks like it would certainly be well worthwhile as a supplement to whatever study and prep route someone took.
I was lucky, the offer when I took it was $9.99. $15 is still a steal. I did it on the flight over from Europe, plus a bit more on the morning of the exam and got 90%.
It's not an in depth course, but the teacher is clearly a pilot and knows his stuff. For me it was perfect. I'm already qualified in the EU and the UK and was looking to get the Part 107 for specific paid broadcast filming on Mavic drones. So, I wasn't starting from scratch.
Hope this extra info helps.
 
I wasn't suggesting it was an either/or decision.

I'm a big advocate of the Pilot Institute, though I did not use their course to prep for my Part 107 exam. I used at least a dozen different sources to build on what I remembered from my Part 61 power and glider days. If I had been starting from scratch, I'd have used the Pilot Institute course.

In any case, the $15 resource looks like it would certainly be well worthwhile as a supplement to whatever study and prep route someone took.

Absolutely - there's about a thousand different paths we all take to get to where we are... some (like me!) need more help than others.

But I just wanted to point out there's a huge difference between "teach to the test" quick courses and actual in-depth knowledge.

We all have a shared responsibility to one another in this thing of ours... I just hate to see someone bypass the knowledge seeking the sheet of paper. Altogether too easy to do -- one of the few complaints I've seen about PI are from folks who just wanted to do the bare minimum to get the piece of paper. It bothers me that those kind of folks hold the same license you and I do.
 
Absolutely - there's about a thousand different paths we all take to get to where we are... some (like me!) need more help than others.

But I just wanted to point out there's a huge difference between "teach to the test" quick courses and actual in-depth knowledge.

We all have a shared responsibility to one another in this thing of ours... I just hate to see someone bypass the knowledge seeking the sheet of paper. Altogether too easy to do -- one of the few complaints I've seen about PI are from folks who just wanted to do the bare minimum to get the piece of paper. It bothers me that those kind of folks hold the same license you and I do.
Yes, that's an issue. It reminds of something a doctor friend said.

"What do you call the guy who finished absolutely dead last by a long shot in his graduating class at med school?

"Doctor."
 
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not making light of the test but everything you need to be successful with it, is free on youtube. As far as knowledge versus passing the test goes, learning by doing is in this process. Clearly you dont want to look like an idiot with the FAA but there are so many tools already established to guide you when flying. Opening an app in an area where you want to fly will tell you what you need as far as restrictions go and whether FAA approval is needed. I interact with the FAA almost every time we fly for my place of work and its been a positive experience. Their people are top notch and have been helpful from the waiver process through day of flight.
 
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