DJI Mavic, Air and Mini Drones
Friendly, Helpful & Knowledgeable Community
Join Us Now

This is the latest news out of New York City Concerning the Flying of Drones…

This might make some mad, but the truth is - their sandbox, their rules. On the ground.
Washington State requires all commercial drones to be registered with the State's Aviation Division yearly, at $15 per drone. Commercial photography within Seattle City limits requires a film permit which I believe is $5000. Not sure how that is enforced.
 
Washington State requires all commercial drones to be registered with the State's Aviation Division yearly, at $15 per drone. Commercial photography within Seattle City limits requires a film permit which I believe is $5000. Not sure how that is enforced.
But no state registration required for recreational drones in Washington state, correct?

I think people are mostly ok with registration at the commercial level but would find it somewhat unusual to require it for people who simply want to fly for fun.
 
Last edited:
But no state registration required for recreational drones in Washington state, correct?

I think people are mostly ok with registration at the commercial level but would find it someone what unusual to require it for people who simply want to fly for fun.
No, only commercial pilots have to pay. Launching and landing from public property in Seattle is challenging for recreational as well though. I fly early in the morning and avoid problems, and I try to stay over the water. Seattle is not drone friendly for the most part. A few years ago a Phantom 3 fell over a parade route, hitting two pedestrians, causing a concussion in one. And then an Inspire caught in power lines causing brown outs to our houseboat population for a few weeks, another cause to hate drones. It cost the city $35000 to take a barge with a crane out to remove the offending and now-fried Inspire from the power lines and restore full power to the Marina community.
I can understand why NY is taking this stance, however much I disagree with it.
 
Last edited:
REMOTE POSSIBILITIES
City institutes rules and fees aimed at controlling drones

New York Daily News ∙ 22 Jul 2023 ∙ BY MICHAEL GARTLAND

Drone operators will have to be licensed by the feds and pay a fee under rules announced Friday by NYPD Commissioner Edward Caban and Mayor Adams (below).

View attachment 166307

Mayor Adams is moving New York City into the drone zone, but critics fear some will be left behind. Adams and top city officials announced Friday that the city is adopting new guidelines around drones intended to make it easier to use them for building and infrastructure inspections, as well as other commercial uses.

“Drones are proven technology, and they’re being used every day,” Adams said during a press conference on the Lower East Side. “The city of New York cannot lead from the rear. We must lead from the front.”

View attachment 166308

The new guidelines and permitting process for drones opens their use up to anyone who wants to apply to the NYPD for a $150 permit. But obtaining a permit comes with requirements, including that the drone operator have a remote pilot certificate, the guidelines for which are laid out by the Federal Aviation Administration.

“Prior to the creation of this process, if someone launched a drone within city limits, they were always, always in violation of the law,” NYPD Commissioner Edward Caban said Friday. “Now, we are creating a balance between legal access and safety for all.”

The requirements around getting a permit and the fee associated with it are likely to limit the number of people seeking to use drones for recreational purposes. But the requirements include provisions that might curb more practical applications of drones as well.

According to the city’s website, applications must be submitted to the city at least 30 days in advance of the first proposed take-off or landing — a timeframe media lawyers say precludes news outlets from using drones to cover breaking stories.

“These proposed rules totally ignore the news media,” said Robert Roth, a Brooklyn-based media lawyer.

That isn’t his only concern. Since the new guidelines aren’t enshrined through a law passed by the City Council, he’s skeptical they’d hold up in court if they were to face a legal challenge.

“It’s a great doubt in my mind, and that of many other lawyers, as to whether or not the NYPD can enact a regulation that effectively amounts to amendment of city law,” Roth said. “I don’t think they can do it.”

Officials from the Adams’ administration did not immediately respond to questions about the issues raised by Roth.

During his press conference Friday, Adams was asked a more general question about how news organizations would be allowed to use drones. He responded by pointing to the new permitting process.

“By having a website, you can see that we are utilizing the permission process in the correct way, and that’s the goal,” he said. “The goal is transparency, allowing people to take away the uncertainty.”

City officials expect contractors and private entities to submit applications for other practical uses like buildings inspections and environmental impact assessments.

The city itself is already using drones for its own inspections and assessments. And Adams has previously touted the city’s use of new technology, most notably when he pointed to use of both drones and robotic dogs in the wake of a downtown building collapse in April.

Deputy Mayor Meera Joshi ticked off several ways the city is now using the technology in other ways, including for bridge inspections conducted by the Transportation Department, facade inspections done by the Buildings Department and an assessment of the city’s tree canopy being undertaken by the Parks Department.

“There are sadly many conditions in this city where a drone inspection is the only way we’re going to be able to see the critical, dangerous fault lines that need rapid repair,” she said.

End of Story…………………..
Does the police department have the authority to create regulations? I thought they enforced them?
 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Does the police department have the authority to create regulations? I thought they enforced them?
Take a look at posts #17 and #19 this has been discussed...not being short with you..just directing you to where you can get some other information supporting your position
If successful it also looks like it's a nice little money earner for the city. $150 a pop hop? hmmmmm
To be a money earner that would be significant to NYC's coffers the fee would have to be exponentially higher and a lot of volume...it is not intended to be a money maker...it is intended to dissuade anyone from even applying...they do not have to approve the application, and it is not refundable.....who is going to apply under those conditions?
Yes, but....

Since anything they're claiming is a danger or a nuisance is really the flight of the drone, aren't these rules really a de facto ban on flying? And thus, couldn't it be argued that they are overstepping?

For instance, what if I were to set up for a flight in Central Park but never launched. Would the police cite me?
Only if you actually launch...nothing says you cannot just set up...
The problem is flying a drone is not a right. So it is true that NYC can say you cannot launch a drone from NYC public property. Not so sure they can say that about private property but that's not the issue here. It's the permit process. NYC has a long sordid history of requiring a permit for an activity, not to regulate it or control it, but in order to prohibit it. As was mentioned earlier, NYC cannot pass an ordinance that says no drone can take-off or land anywhere in the NY city limits 24/7. But this process is a defacto ban because they'll never issue a single permit or maybe they issue one or two permits to make it viable.

We've faced this before. Unfortunately they'll probably get away with it because flying a drone is not something a city resident is entitled to do. However, where NYC will face problems, I mentioned earlier, the press will never be able to properly fly a drone to gather news and other public interest because there is no exception in this process and the government can pick and choose who gets a permit and when and where and even then, it's not timely. As far as I know, this is per incident, no monthly or yearly. Still, if you can issue a permit, you can revoke it or suspend. Or you can raise the price to $2,000. No government should have that kind of power over the free press. Before anyone says the press doesn't need to fly drones to effectively report the news....that's not the point.
Private property?...Just because it is private property would it be OK to kill or rape someone there?...And NYC not only can but has passed a law that outlaws launching, landing controlling a drone except in the designated NYC Parks....as far as power over free press....the rules apply to everyone...not directed at the press...and in NYC the media does have a history of interfering with emergency situations with their helicopters...drones that a media agency ( the press) would bring to an ongoing emergency would interfere with legitimate emergency helicopters ....not a money grab, just a way of saying NO DRONES ALLOWED
NO DRONES.jpg
 
I think it's funny how they proclaim zero tolerance and specifically call out there's no excuse now that they've made up new rules to accommodate but in fact, it's going to be a NFZ which likely has nothing to do with NYC. I would love to see how many people are able to get permission to fly near the Open, my guess is zero with the excuse being NFZ but again, they make it seem like you need to obey because we've made it "easy" instead of you need to obey because it's the law that has been in place even before we came up with our own rules. Anyway, how many rogue drones are they going to catch or see near the Open? My guess is one, maybe two. One person trying to fly against the law illegally to get videos and one person who didn't know any better but still trying to get a video. The other dozen or so violators will be pilots flying in the nearby city parks and school grounds and private backyards a mile or two or three away from the courts who had no idea about the NFZ or knew but didn't think it was in effect after hours after all the athletes have gone home. Those are the victims although they were wrong, they are going to answer to both NYC and the FAA.

Would suck to have a drone safety conviction on your record forever when in ten years, there will be a dozen commercial drones operated by the league and the network at every event....just not yours.

 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Just to get this straight, they want all flyers recreational included to pay $150 per flight?
During the Q&A part, it was insinuated that only part 107 pilots will have to beg for a permit for up to 5 flights in advance per $150 extraction; no refunds. They are calling them "take off and landing fees" to help overcome the legal hurdles and further burden and confuse drone flyers because it's not clear that this doesn't apply to recreational pilots, too. Based on the handbook, it is clear the process is unusable by the recreational pilot. The confusion comes in when the recreational pilot now believes the process is not for him and thus he is free to fly without a permit, not understand it it likely illegal for *any* drone to take off or land without a permit. Of course, unless you fly in one of the State FRIAs which was mumbled to be one of the 5 city parks. They weren't clear at the presser but I bet it becomes real clear when you are actually flying on site.


This is key. In the video, Field Marshal Caban said "Prior to the creation of this process, if someone launched a drone within the city limits, they were almost always always in violation of the law." 🤣

 
Let's see how this goes. Honestly, I think it's ok for the police to use a drone in circumstances like this where they get a call and have to send out an officer who has to find his way thru a maze to get to the right location where the party is happening and then have to make contact with the right person, etc. Once officers get there, they won't leave, etc etc. So why not park on the main avenue, send in the drone, send a message.

At the same time, I understand the residents' concerns. Will they show up if there isn't a call? Which neighborhoods do they patrol? Will they write tickets from drone footage? Is drone footage now a public record? Are there plans to use facial recognition when it becomes available?

 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Let's see how this goes. Honestly, I think it's ok for the police to use a drone in circumstances like this where they get a call and have to send out an officer who has to find his way thru a maze to get to the right location where the party is happening and then have to make contact with the right person, etc. Once officers get there, they won't leave, etc etc. So why not park on the main avenue, send in the drone, send a message.

At the same time, I understand the residents' concerns. Will they show up if there isn't a call? Which neighborhoods do they patrol? Will they write tickets from drone footage? Is drone footage now a public record? Are there plans to use facial recognition when it becomes available?

I hope thay have a properly obtained warrant!!
 
  • Like
Reactions: LoudThunder
I hope thay have a properly obtained warrant!!
Like many departments, they likely won't get a warrant which requires probable cause and they don't have it if they intend to spy. Police will fly drones under new laws that are passed to give them the authority to snoop in the name of safety and ultimately they end up abusing it and pushing the limits. I just didn't expect this so quickly, monitoring parties. Certainly they will be looking for guns, wanted people, drug transactions, and they'll record everything including license plates, etc. I wouldn't be surprised if they are testing face recognition.

 
  • Wow
Reactions: LoudThunder
Wait, isn't that a DJI drone?
Yes it is a DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise…

Prohibited, that's a tricky question, I know that Federal funds cannot be used to buy DJI Drones and we already know NYC considers itself an entity onto itself and not under the auspices of the FAA and all it's "senseless rules" that allows folks to fly in Class G Airspace unmolested by NYC's Finest…

So, I guess they operate with total impunity since they are so big and no one answers to anyone else.
 
  • Like
Reactions: finity
Yes it is a DJI Mavic 2 Enterprise…

Prohibited, that's a tricky question, I know that Federal funds cannot be used to buy DJI Drones and we already know NYC considers itself an entity onto itself and not under the auspices of the FAA and all it's "senseless rules" that allows folks to fly in Class G Airspace unmolested by NYC's Finest…

So, I guess they operate with total impunity since they are so big and no one answers to anyone else.
Not sure of what the point is that you are trying to make, but do you realize that the guys in that video are from Lake County ( wherever that is)..and not NYC?
 
Not sure of what the point is that you are trying to make,
Well, the detective may not have been from NYC, but the point is the NYPD does what it wants to do. Will you submit your $150 fee for an opportunity for the NYPD to disapprove your application to fly in one of their controlled areas, knowing full well, they will not return your fee?

You live like 25-miles (as the drone flies) from NYC, will you risk (really gamble…) that the NYPD will approve your application to fly in NYC…

I believe that it is really a non-program… Oh, they set up a program to "allow" drones to fly in controlled areas of NYC but eh conditions are so onerous that few, if any drones get to fly…

I would be very happy to be proven wrong. I hope you prove me wrong when you publish your first NYC Video…

And the sub-point was that it's illegal only for Federal money to be used to buy DJI…

the U.S. Commerce Department officially blacklisted DJI because of its technologies' use in China's Uyghur detention camps. It is still legal for DJI to sell its drones in the US, but banned U.S. companies from exporting their products for DJI use.

Some states and or municipalities may have also enacted legislation to prevent the purchase of DJI drones. But that does not make it illegal for their government agencies (police, fire, etc…) from buying DJI Drones, just prohibited…
 
Last edited:
NYPD will be using drones on the beaches so you probably won't get to fly your drone on the beach; I can see where your permission application would be denied due to interfering with ongoing NYPD drone operations along the beach. Let's face it, the goal of the NYPD is to clear the skies over NY from recreational and commercial drones and slowly fill it full of NYPD drones until the citizens become comfortable with police drones everywhere and no other drones flying around. When and if commercial drones become a thing, by that time they will have solidified their hold over the entire airspace over the city and commercial operators will have to coordinate and clear with NYPD for limited and sanctioned operations. It's right out of the movies and we do nothing to stop it.

 
Dead issue....all of you arguing about this are from outside the area and really not effected by it...for the most part people who live in this area ( I am outside the City, but would love to fly there) understand the need for such control over the hobby, and know the places ( although very few) where it is completely legal to fly.....the current NYC laws prohibit Launching, controlling and landing within the City....there are places you can fly from and enter City airspace and fly problem free. It really is not the big deal you are making of it.
 
Lycus Tech Mavic Air 3 Case

DJI Drone Deals

New Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
130,014
Messages
1,548,398
Members
159,070
Latest member
gremmy