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What Can I do?

drone_dh

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I live in a neighborhood that has absolutely NO restrictions above my house. I usually do not fly much out of the space above my house, or around my property. B4UFLY shows nothing here that would prevent me from flying to my 400 foot limit.
So, knowing what my drones look like at 400 feet above my house, what do I do when an airplane flies over my house, at what I'm guessing, 2-300 feet above my house? I can with almost no reservations say that I KNOW what 400 feet looks like. This isn't the first time, so my questions are these... first, is there a limit on how low an aircraft can fly over my house? And yes, they are learning to fly, I almost took flying lessons so I at least know when they are doing stalls, or no power excercises... yes, above my house at low altitude.
I'm hoping I am completely overreacting because of my lack of knowledge, I really need to finish my Pilot Institute course to better understand airspaces. If I am overreacting, I apologize, it just seems freaky that I can fly my drone well over what these aircraft are flying, sometimes directly over my house. I just hope that if I *am* flying, I see them in time so I can get my drone out of the air!
 
Understand your point and there isn't anything mitigating that you can do. Drone pilots are responsible for looking out for manned aircraft at all times and planes & helicopters will often fly below 400 feet. In the event there is a collision or even a close call, just understand it will technically be your fault by default. Not much you can do about that. If you fly your drone within visual line of site and or use a spotter, you might just be able to avoid hurting anyone while you are playing with your drone. ;)
 
Well, I play it safe always, so if there was an aircraft in the vicinity I simply wouldn't or have not flown. I just thought that if I have a ceiling, pardon the cheesy Top Gun reference, they would also have some sort of hard deck to stay above.
There is, and never will be, any scenario where I'd even chance interfering with an aircraft, which is why I put my ignorance on the line here for some help.
Thanks!
 
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As has been said above, the onus is on you to look and listen and yield to manned aircraft. As far as I'm aware, fixed wing aircraft must stay above 500ft unless on final for landing or checking out a landing field. Are you on the approach to an airfield? If it's an small airfield it won't necessarily be in controlled airspace.
If fixed wing planes are buzzing your house that low and you're not on a runway approach you could/should contact the FAA.
I'll stand corrected if any pilots want to jump in here.
 
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Also I see a lot of planes and helicopters around here that I believe are flying too low....and they are, but they aren't breaking any rules I dont believe. I live in controlled airspace so I have 100 and 200 and 250 grids all around me and I used to think these planes were below that but in reality, they aren't. Just looks that way; turns out they are higher than they look. But even when I set my max altitude at 200, still have to be wary because like I said, near misses count as well. I guess we have to wait until Amazon or UPS or Walmart officially starts flying drones before we get some sort of break.
 
So, knowing what my drones look like at 400 feet above my house, what do I do when an airplane flies over my house, at what I'm guessing, 2-300 feet above my house? I can with almost no reservations say that I KNOW what 400 feet looks like.
This isn't the first time, so my questions are these... first, is there a limit on how low an aircraft can fly over my house? And yes, they are learning to fly, I almost took flying lessons so I at least know when they are doing stalls, or no power excercises... yes, above my house at low altitude.
It's very common to incorrectly estimate the height of planes overhead.
It would be extremely irresponsible for any instructor to have student pilots carrying out stall or loss of power exercises at low altitude and it's doubtful that this is actually happening.
 
I saw a helicopter flying over our local small town about 150' AGL, perhaps even lower than that. Just a bit above the treetops.

Just seemed grossly irresponsible to me. Forget about drones, just way too many things can go wrong that close to the ground.
 
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@Meta4 - I agree, it is hard to accurately estimate a plane's height above you... EXCEPT, I know that when I take my Mavic up to see the ocean nearby, it is far higher than the plane was flying yesterday. I know brother... accurate? No, but if there aren't any planes I see/hear today I am going to launch it and hit my 400 agl to see.
Again, the whole point was to see if there was any type of low height for an aircraft to fly over a fully populated subdivision. No biggie, just askin!
 
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Again, the whole point was to see if there was any type of low height for an aircraft to fly over a fully populated subdivision. No biggie, just askin!
Here's what you wanted:
§ 91.119 Minimum safe altitudes: General.
Except when necessary for takeoff or landing, no person may operate an aircraft below the following altitudes:
(a) Anywhere. An altitude allowing, if a power unit fails, an emergency landing without undue hazard to persons or property on the surface.
(b) Over congested areas. Over any congested area of a city, town, or settlement, or over any open air assembly of persons, an altitude of 1,000 feet above the highest obstacle within a horizontal radius of 2,000 feet of the aircraft.
(c) Over other than congested areas. An altitude of 500 feet above the surface, except over open water or sparsely populated areas. In those cases, the aircraft may not be operated closer than 500 feet to any person, vessel, vehicle, or structure.
(d) Helicopters, powered parachutes, and weight-shift-control aircraft. If the operation is conducted without hazard to persons or property on the surface—
(1) A helicopter may be operated at less than the minimums prescribed in paragraph (b) or (c) of this section, provided each person operating the helicopter complies with any routes or altitudes specifically prescribed for helicopters by the FAA
 
Other than for the purpose of take off or landing GA are limited to a minimum of 1500 feet agl anove built up areas or a height where they can glide clear in event of engine falure !
If they are down at 400 feet I would check whether you are in an airport zone ! Farm fields are another caution but do not tend to be close to towns !
In the country sde single engine aircraft will practice forced landings into a field so beware ? but if it happens a lot sounds like you are on the approach to an airfield
 
I live in a neighborhood that has absolutely NO restrictions above my house. I usually do not fly much out of the space above my house, or around my property. B4UFLY shows nothing here that would prevent me from flying to my 400 foot limit.
So, knowing what my drones look like at 400 feet above my house, what do I do when an airplane flies over my house, at what I'm guessing, 2-300 feet above my house? I can with almost no reservations say that I KNOW what 400 feet looks like. This isn't the first time, so my questions are these... first, is there a limit on how low an aircraft can fly over my house? And yes, they are learning to fly, I almost took flying lessons so I at least know when they are doing stalls, or no power excercises... yes, above my house at low altitude.
I'm hoping I am completely overreacting because of my lack of knowledge, I really need to finish my Pilot Institute course to better understand airspaces. If I am overreacting, I apologize, it just seems freaky that I can fly my drone well over what these aircraft are flying, sometimes directly over my house. I just hope that if I *am* flying, I see them in time so I can get my drone out of the air!
It is no coincidence that the minimum height a general aviation airplane is supposed to fly over your house is 500’, giving a theoretical buffer of 100’ between you and it if you are at 400’. But you can get a good idea of their height from an app like flight radar. That will show you their height above mean sea level (MSL). Subtract the elevation of your house from that to get their height AGL. “Low flying” aircraft will be 1-2000’ AGL.
 
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It is no coincidence that the minimum height a general aviation airplane is supposed to fly over your house is 500’, giving a theoretical buffer of 100’ between you and it if you are at 400’. But you can get a good idea of their height from an app like flight radar. That will show you their height above mean sea level (MSL). Subtract the elevation of your house from that to get their height AGL. “Low flying” aircraft will be 1-2000’ AGL.

Not contradicting, asking a question.

Are you sure that the altitude reported by ADS-B on those apps is MSL altitude? It's common to set aircraft barometers at the field elevation for local flights. I've not been able to find any specifications on what the altitude reference is on those apps. The only thing I've found so far is that the altitude is what's reported by the individual aircraft's ADS-B.
 
I at least know when they are doing stalls, or no power excercises... yes, above my house at low altitude.
You can rest assured that stalls and engine failure exercises aren't being conducted over your house at 300' AGL or less.

Stalls are typically practiced at a minimum of 1500' AGL. Instructors may do a power failure exercise at lower altitudes, but it would be close to a suitable landing area and not low over buildings.
 
Not contradicting, asking a question.

Are you sure that the altitude reported by ADS-B on those apps is MSL altitude? It's common to set aircraft barometers at the field elevation for local flights. I've not been able to find any specifications on what the altitude reference is on those apps. The only thing I've found so far is that the altitude is what's reported by the individual aircraft's ADS-B.
There are 3 settings ! All altitudes refer to above sea level and is the QNH
QFE is the airfield elevation and is only used for aircraft in the Airfield pattern
Most departures arrivals use QNH ! IFR charts stipulate both ! FL or flight levels 1013 or USA 2992 is a standard setting above a specified Altitude
 
There are 3 settings ! All altitudes refer to above sea level and is the QNH
QFE is the airfield elevation and is only used for aircraft in the Airfield pattern
Most departures arrivals use QNH ! IFR charts stipulate both ! FL or flight levels 1013 or USA 2992 is a standard setting above a specified Altitude
Yes. I'm wondering how a drone pilot using a flight tracking app can determine which reference is being used by the aircraft that he's concerned about near his location.
 
Yes. I'm wondering how a drone pilot using a flight tracking app can determine which reference is being used by the aircraft that he's concerned about near his location.
Because I routinely fly my drones to just below 400 feet above my house to see what the beach looks like. I am less than half a mile from the beach, and whether anyone wants to contest my judgement, they ARE flying, and doing stalls, much, much lower than 1500, and the guy yesterday prompting my post was DEFINITELY less than 400. I was in the yard planting with my wife, and the plane, which was close enough I could see the pilot's face, cut his engine just above my house. Sorry guys, I ain't makin it up. I just wanted to know if they should be doing this, and what should I do to keep them from doing it, if possible. Also, the question came up am I on an approach to an airport - absolutely not! There used to be a small airport about 5 or so miles away but they filled the entire thing up with solar panels, and it is no longer useable as an airfield.
So, many flights above my house is how a drone pilot can determine, at least fairly closely, how far above my head an aircraft is.
 
Because I routinely fly my drones to just below 400 feet above my house to see what the beach looks like. I am less than half a mile from the beach, and whether anyone wants to contest my judgement, they ARE flying, and doing stalls, much, much lower than 1500, and the guy yesterday prompting my post was DEFINITELY less than 400. I was in the yard planting with my wife, and the plane, which was close enough I could see the pilot's face, cut his engine just above my house. Sorry guys, I ain't makin it up. I just wanted to know if they should be doing this, and what should I do to keep them from doing it, if possible. Also, the question came up am I on an approach to an airport - absolutely not! There used to be a small airport about 5 or so miles away but they filled the entire thing up with solar panels, and it is no longer useable as an airfield.
So, many flights above my house is how a drone pilot can determine, at least fairly closely, how far above my head an aircraft is.
The Florida Panhandle has many USN and USAF flight training and operations areas. Are the aircraft you're seeing military? Do you mind sharing your location?

www.skyvector.com has online sectional charts. Here's a clipping.

Screenshot 2024-03-29 120113.jpg
 

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