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What to do if no one picks up? 5 miles from airport

I am planning to fly my drone later today, according to the B4UFly app I will be a little under 2 miles from a local airport and that I need to notify the airport.

This is a small airport with no tower, but a phone number. So, I called the number and no one is picking up, likely no one is there on a Sunday. I've tried a couple times and cannot get hold of anyone, so do I give up on my plan to fly today? Are there any other options?

Thanks.
I agree, fly with keen awareness. Call airfield, if anybody questions you, you’ll have a record on your phone you tried to call. FYI, it is not uncommon to not get someone to answer the phone.
 
I picked up this radio when I started flying gliders and realized that many of them do not have any electrical system and radios at all. The original poster's question got me thinking about this and for now on I'm going to carry my little radio with me in case I run into a situation like his in the future. You just have to monitor the CTAF And when you hear traffic announced for a take off or landing you could just jump on the frequency and announce where you are what you're doing. Just a thought.

This radio cost me 150.00 and has been well worth. Not just for flying but for sheer entertainment value. It will also let you know about traffic before the traffic knows about you.View attachment 71021

Don't you need a license of some kind to transmit on those frequencies? I ordered a scanner to use if near non-tower airports, with the thinking I can just land until the traffic clears. My buddy lives near a small non-tower airport (Silver West, near Westcliff, Colorado) He does know the airport manager a little, and I do plan on having a chat with him before flying in the area.
 
I picked up this radio when I started flying gliders and realized that many of them do not have any electrical system and radios at all. The original poster's question got me thinking about this and for now on I'm going to carry my little radio with me in case I run into a situation like his in the future. You just have to monitor the CTAF And when you hear traffic announced for a take off or landing you could just jump on the frequency and announce where you are what you're doing. Just a thought.

This radio cost me 150.00 and has been well worth. Not just for flying but for sheer entertainment value. It will also let you know about traffic before the traffic knows about you.View attachment 71021

Our local airport and air tanker base always says OK when I ask them if it’s OK to fly near them. They just ask me to monitor their CTAF also so I also bought a Yaesu aeronautical band transmitter and monitor it while flying for incoming/outgoing aircraft.
 
I am planning to fly my drone later today, according to the B4UFly app I will be a little under 2 miles from a local airport and that I need to notify the airport.

This is a small airport with no tower, but a phone number. So, I called the number and no one is picking up, likely no one is there on a Sunday. I've tried a couple times and cannot get hold of anyone, so do I give up on my plan to fly today? Are there any other options?

Thanks.

Just watch out, listen for planes
 
I think just having the radio in your kit would go a long way towards establishing a good intention if ever confronted with a "ramp check" or violation. I've met a couple of FAA guys over the years and I've always been surprised at the level of professionalism and general attitude such as dealing with a new pilot who has busted the ceiling in controlled airspace (me). Or, like the guy who owned my plane before me who ran out of gas and landed on Route 287 in NJ. If you ever want to find out what these guys have to say about enforcement of drone regs etc. or have an interesting afternoon just call your local FSDO and ask to speak with someone about the regs or advice. You will probably get an invite to visit the office and they are more than happy to assist pilots and drone pilots. Like it or not drones and their usage will become just like everyone that uses the public airspace: Probably training abs a license down the line and obey rules that keep everyone safe.
Our local airport and air tanker base always says OK when I ask them if it’s OK to fly near them. They just ask me to monitor their CTAF also so I also bought a Yaesu aeronautical band transmitter and monitor it while flying for incoming/outgoing aircraft.
 
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I think just having the radio in your kit would go a long way towards establishing a good intention if ever confronted with a "ramp check" or violation. I've met a couple of FAA guys over the years and I've always been surprised at the level of professionalism and general attitude such as dealing with a new pilot who has busted the ceiling in controlled airspace (me). Or, like the guy who owned my plane before me who ran out of gas and landed on Route 287 in NJ. If you ever want to find out what these guys have to say about enforcement of drone regs etc. or have an interesting afternoon just call your local FSDO and ask to speak with someone about the regs or advice. You will probably get an invite to visit the office and they are more than happy to assist pilots and drone pilots. Like it or not drones and their usage will become just like everyone that uses the public airspace: Probably training abs a license down the line and obey rules that keep everyone safe.


Very well said. They are just people like us and they are there to help/guide when needed.
 
They will always say they would rather be giving you advice than an enforcement action.

For my stupid blunder, I was told to take a lesson with my instructor in which we would go over the local airspace. He then told me to read the manual on my GPS so that I would know how to program the altitude warning. That was it. I was expecting a suspension.

Just a couple of years ago I called him to let him know that my son and I were learning to fly gliders and my son needed a permit. He invited us in. Did the forms with my son and gave him a temp.permit. He then asked about my rating and we discussed IFR in the NY airspace. I didn't want to leave I found it so interesting. The visit addressed 2 things: It showed my 17 year old that this was serious business and that his first encounter with the FAA was a pleasant one.

I then told my son how many years in federal prison you get for flying under the influence or any other flagrant disregard of the rules or reckless endangerment.

Sorry for the run on post. I can go on for hours about aviation.
Very well said. They are just people like us and they are there to help/guide when needed.
 
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Sorry for the run on post. I can go on for hours about aviation.

No need for sorry with me. One of my favorite pastimes is good ole "Hangar Talk". Time stands still when you're with like-minded people telling stories and tales LOL.

If you want to really get the FAA's/ATC's attention, declare an Emergency while flying in the pattern at the airport with a gaggle of airliners lined up waiting to takeoff and more in the lineup waiting to land.

Been there... got the t-shirt and the FORMS! LOL
 
Obviously you survived but what happened? Did you get your PPL?

The thing that impresses me is just how fast controllers go into super mode. There is a YouTube channel that posts audio from incidents along with diagrams. It's fascinating. If you in your 152 says the word emergency you go right to the top of the list and it seems like every other pilot on frequency is more than happy to go into a hold or whatever for the guy who's having a problem. Time and again I am impressed with how controllers handle emergencies.

When I filed for my IFR test, I mentioned I was taking the test. The controller (?) wished me luck. When we got to the Trenton ILS the examiner mentioned that it was odd that they were vectoring me for a text book glide slope intercept. When I let the tower know we were going to do the missed approach and right after I gave him the read back he said "Good luck." So I guess the first guy passed on the info. And I like that memory and that cured my anxiety about talking to ATC ever after. They are as fanatical as any pilot about aviation.
 
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Obviously you survived but what happened? Did you get your PPL?

The thing that impresses me is just how fast controllers go into super mode. There is a YouTube channel that posts audio from incidents along with diagrams. It's fascinating. If you in your 152 says the word emergency you go right to the top of the list and it seems like every other pilot on frequency is more than happy to go into a hold or whatever for the guy who's having a problem. Time and again I am impressed with how controllers handle emergencies.

When I filed for my IFR test, I mentioned I was taking the test. The controller (?) wished me luck. When we got to the Trenton ILS the examiner mentioned that it was odd that they were vectoring me for a text book glide slope intercept. When I let the tower know we were going to do the missed approach and right after I gave him the read back he said "Good luck." So I guess the first guy passed on the info. And I like that memory and that cured my anxiety about talking to ATC ever after. They are as fanatical as any pilot about aviation.

Yes sir they are amazing and can "Change hats" in the blink of an eye. We were in 172 and yes we were essentially the only plane in the area (from a priority stand point).

We were training (I had my CFI by my side) and descending to enter the pattern when we encountered a sudden ICING situation (the beauty of flying in the mountains is you never know). Because of the terrain etc there wasn't much wiggle room to try and find warm air so we had to maintain a much higher than desired approach speed. We had to fly/land in a "Crab" in order to see as the front windshield was now "Privacy Glass". It wasn't a great landing (Well it WAS because we didn't break anything or die) but after a few "hops" we taxied to the holding area where Fire/EMS were stationed "just in case". As ATC was transferring us to "Ground Control" he said, "You have someone waiting on you to sign some papers at the Jet Center........good job 35Quebec......"

Re:pPL ~ Yes sir. One of the best days of my life to be honest!! But that's a whole other story that I'll share another time LOL! Once again I was glad to get back on the ground in 1 piece :)
 
Our local airport and air tanker base always says OK when I ask them if it’s OK to fly near them. They just ask me to monitor their CTAF also so I also bought a Yaesu aeronautical band transmitter and monitor it while flying for incoming/outgoing aircraft.
Where did you find your FTA-230? I'm shopping and have not found anything for less than $200.
 
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This change in topic may be best served as its own topic since it is no longer required, actually prohibited, in calling an airport that you'll be flying within 5 miles from it.
 
This change in topic may be best served as its own topic since it is no longer required, actually prohibited, in calling an airport that you'll be flying within 5 miles from it.

You are required to call ATC if there’s a fly away or other emergency that can affect the airport, plus monitoring for air traffic is a good safety precaution. Our local ATC still requests us to do that.

But you are right, in lieu of calling the airport on the phone, you have to go through LAANC or get the waiver.
 
I am planning to fly my drone later today, according to the B4UFly app I will be a little under 2 miles from a local airport and that I need to notify the airport.

This is a small airport with no tower, but a phone number. So, I called the number and no one is picking up, likely no one is there on a Sunday. I've tried a couple times and cannot get hold of anyone, so do I give up on my plan to fly today? Are there any other options?

Thanks.
Recreational UAS pilots can no longer call any airport in the U.S. Airspace. Dump the B4UFly app and use the AIRMAP app. Then you will be able to submit a flight plan directly to the FAA using the L.A.A.N.C. (Low Altitude Authorization and Notification Capability) system and you will receive back from the FAA in seconds weather your flight plan was approved or not. The AIRMAP app informs the user about what class of airspace they are currently located in. If you are located in controlled airspace, the app's map will show a grid with a number in each square in the grid. These numbers begin at 50 feet Above Ground Level (AGL), 100, 200, 300, and 400. The reason for these grids are so that UAS pilot's will know the maximum altitude allowed by the FAA in your current flight plan prior to submitting it to LAANC. Check the app out at Pilots - AirMap

Enjoy Flying!
 
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