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I obtained these 2 certificates: Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent, and Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots; What do I use them for?

cgmaxed

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I was just practicing taking FAA tests and followed the study guide and passed these online Certifications: What do I do with them, or what are they for?
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent
Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots

Is there any benefit to having these?

I attached the Certificate Cards
 

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I was just practicing taking FAA tests and followed the study guide and passed these online Certifications: What do I do with them, or what are they for?
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent
Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots

Is there any benefit to having these?

I attached the Certificate Cards
You can put them in your training folder, as they document training received.
What I would suggest to you is to become familiar with Federal Aviation Regulations Title 14 Section 107. A good avenue for you would be to go to pilotinstitute.com. They have a lot of free videos and information that might help you get to where you want to go. By then you will know how you can apply the training you received and where you want to go from there.
Good Luck
B 52 D
Blue Skys & Happy Contrails
 
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I was just practicing taking FAA tests and followed the study guide and passed these online Certifications: What do I do with them, or what are they for?
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent
Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots

Is there any benefit to having these?

I attached the Certificate Cards

Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent:


This is the training you have to take every 2 years after taking the Part 107 test at a testing center and obtaining your Part 107 Airman certificate. If you don't already have a Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate, then this training is legally meaningless to you. However, the knowledge itself can be useful for any UAS pilot.



Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots:

If you are already a Part 61 manned pilot (for example, for airplanes), and are up to date with your required currency (meaning you've had a FAA checkride or Flight Review within the last 2 years), then you can use this specific training course to obtain your Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate. Otherwise, this course is also legally meaningless to you.
 
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent:

This is the training you have to take every 2 years after taking the Part 107 test at a testing center and obtaining your Part 107 Airman certificate. If you don't already have a Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate, then this training is legally meaningless to you. However, the knowledge itself can be useful for any UAS pilot.



Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots:
If you are already a Part 61 manned pilot (for example, for airplanes), and are up to date with your required currency (meaning you've had a FAA checkride or Flight Review within the last 2 years), then you can use this specific training course to obtain your Part 107 Remote Pilot certificate. Otherwise, this course is also legally meaningless to you.
Thanks, It's what I thought, but wasn't sure. I don't have the part 107 from a testing center, yet. I guess I'll study up and pay the fees and set the appointment here at a local testing center. Besides being able to legally do commercial work are there any benefits to having a 107 vs Recreational??? I have read recreational pilots can fly at night with anti-collision and orientation lights. Can I assume recreationals can now fly UNSUSTAINED flights over people and moving vehicles? Or have recreationals always been able to do that? Regardless, I still want a 107 to make a little extra cash on the side.
 
Can I assume recreationals can now fly UNSUSTAINED flights over people and moving vehicles? Or have recreationals always been able to do that? Regardless, I still want a 107 to make a little extra cash on the side.
It’s a tricky one because technically the law never mentions flying over people in the recreational exception but the FAA maintains recreational pilots cannot fly over people at all.
 
It’s a tricky one because technically the law never mentions flying over people in the recreational exception but the FAA maintains recreational pilots cannot fly over people at all.
I believe the recreational exception refers to flying within the guidelines of a community organization (like the AMA), and most of those guidelines say not to fly over people (or to at least "avoid" doing so).
 
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I believe the recreational exception refers to flying within the guidelines of a community organization (like the AMA), and most of those guidelines say not to fly over people (or to at least "avoid" doing so).
Yea but the FAA still hasn’t told us what a CBO is or which ones are acceptable so at the moment it’s still the Wild West CBO wise.
 
It says:

“Once the FAA has developed the criteria for recognition of CBOs and started officially recognizing CBOs, those CBOs’ safety guidelines will be available for use. During this interim period, the FAA offers two means to satisfy this statutory condition. Recreational flyers should be able to explain to an FAA inspector or law enforcement official which safety guidelines they are following.

7.1.2.1 The FAA acknowledges that existing aeromodelling organizations have developed safety guidelines that are helpful to recreational flyers. An example is the AMA safety guidelines, which have previously been reviewed by the FAA as part of the organization’s Recognized Industry Organization (RIO) status for participation in the National Aviation Events Program (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 6, Issue/Renew/Reevaluate/Rescind an Air Boss Letter of Authorization). These or existing safety guidelines of another aeromodelling organization may be used for recreational operations, provided the guidelines do not conflict with the other statutory conditions of 49 U.S.C. § 44809(a).

7.1.2.2 The FAA has existing basic safety guidelines for recreational operations, which are available on its website
(Recreational Flyers & Modeler Community-Based Organizations) that may be used
.”

So they haven’t yet started officially recognizing CBO’s so you can either use ANY existing guidelines or the FAA’s guidelines. This is all I meant. ANY is pretty broad.

Interesting, however, is that the FAA’s guidelines use to say not to fly over people but unless I’ve missed it it no longer says anything about flying over people. So I guess recreational pilots can fly over people now with no restrictions??


  1. Fly only for recreational purposes (enjoyment).
  2. Follow the safety guidelines of an FAA-recognized Community Based Organization (CBO).
    Note: We have not yet begun officially recognizing CBOs. Recreational flyers are directed to follow the safety guidelines of existing aeromodeling organizations or use the FAA provided safety guidelines per Advisory Circular 91-57B.
  3. Keep your drone within the visual line of sight or use a visual observer who is co-located (physically next to) and in direct communication with you.
  4. Give way to and do not interfere with manned aircraft.
  5. Fly at or below 400' in controlled airspace (Class B, C, D, and E) only with prior authorization by using LAANC or DroneZone.
  6. Fly at or below 400 feet in Class G (uncontrolled) airspace.
    Note: Flying drones in certain airspace is not allowed. Classes of airspace and flying restrictions can be found on our B4UFLY app or the UAS Facility Maps webpage.
  7. Take The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) and carry proof of test passage (coming soon).
  8. Have a current registration, mark (PDF) your drones on the outside with the registration number, and carry proof of registration with you.
  9. Do not operate your drone in a dangerous manner. For example:
    1. Do not interfere with emergency response or law enforcement activities.
    2. Do not fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
 
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Yea but the FAA still hasn’t told us what a CBO is or which ones are acceptable so at the moment it’s still the Wild West CBO wise.
Note: CBO stands for Community Based Organization, for those that don't know.
 
It says:

“Once the FAA has developed the criteria for recognition of CBOs and started officially recognizing CBOs, those CBOs’ safety guidelines will be available for use. During this interim period, the FAA offers two means to satisfy this statutory condition. Recreational flyers should be able to explain to an FAA inspector or law enforcement official which safety guidelines they are following.

7.1.2.1 The FAA acknowledges that existing aeromodelling organizations have developed safety guidelines that are helpful to recreational flyers. An example is the AMA safety guidelines, which have previously been reviewed by the FAA as part of the organization’s Recognized Industry Organization (RIO) status for participation in the National Aviation Events Program (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 6, Issue/Renew/Reevaluate/Rescind an Air Boss Letter of Authorization). These or existing safety guidelines of another aeromodelling organization may be used for recreational operations, provided the guidelines do not conflict with the other statutory conditions of 49 U.S.C. § 44809(a).

7.1.2.2 The FAA has existing basic safety guidelines for recreational operations, which are available on its website
(Recreational Flyers & Modeler Community-Based Organizations) that may be used
.”

So they haven’t yet started officially recognizing CBO’s so you can either use ANY existing guidelines or the FAA’s guidelines. This is all I meant. ANY is pretty broad.
That document explicitly says that you can use the AMA guidelines and/or the FAA guidelines. So yes - contrary to your post above they certainly have said what are currently acceptable options.
 
It says:

“Once the FAA has developed the criteria for recognition of CBOs and started officially recognizing CBOs, those CBOs’ safety guidelines will be available for use. During this interim period, the FAA offers two means to satisfy this statutory condition. Recreational flyers should be able to explain to an FAA inspector or law enforcement official which safety guidelines they are following.

7.1.2.1 The FAA acknowledges that existing aeromodelling organizations have developed safety guidelines that are helpful to recreational flyers. An example is the AMA safety guidelines, which have previously been reviewed by the FAA as part of the organization’s Recognized Industry Organization (RIO) status for participation in the National Aviation Events Program (refer to FAA Order 8900.1, Volume 5, Chapter 9, Section 6, Issue/Renew/Reevaluate/Rescind an Air Boss Letter of Authorization). These or existing safety guidelines of another aeromodelling organization may be used for recreational operations, provided the guidelines do not conflict with the other statutory conditions of 49 U.S.C. § 44809(a).

7.1.2.2 The FAA has existing basic safety guidelines for recreational operations, which are available on its website
(Recreational Flyers & Modeler Community-Based Organizations) that may be used
.”

So they haven’t yet started officially recognizing CBO’s so you can either use ANY existing guidelines or the FAA’s guidelines. This is all I meant. ANY is pretty broad.

Interesting, however, is that the FAA’s guidelines use to say not to fly over people but unless I’ve missed it it no longer says anything about flying over people. So I guess recreational pilots can fly over people now with no restrictions??


  1. Fly only for recreational purposes (enjoyment).
  2. Follow the safety guidelines of an FAA-recognized Community Based Organization (CBO).
    Note: We have not yet begun officially recognizing CBOs. Recreational flyers are directed to follow the safety guidelines of existing aeromodeling organizations or use the FAA provided safety guidelines per Advisory Circular 91-57B.
  3. Keep your drone within the visual line of sight or use a visual observer who is co-located (physically next to) and in direct communication with you.
  4. Give way to and do not interfere with manned aircraft.
  5. Fly at or below 400' in controlled airspace (Class B, C, D, and E) only with prior authorization by using LAANC or DroneZone.
  6. Fly at or below 400 feet in Class G (uncontrolled) airspace.
    Note: Flying drones in certain airspace is not allowed. Classes of airspace and flying restrictions can be found on our B4UFLY app or the UAS Facility Maps webpage.
  7. Take The Recreational UAS Safety Test (TRUST) and carry proof of test passage (coming soon).
  8. Have a current registration, mark (PDF) your drones on the outside with the registration number, and carry proof of registration with you.
  9. Do not operate your drone in a dangerous manner. For example:
    1. Do not interfere with emergency response or law enforcement activities.
    2. Do not fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol.
In other words, regarding flying over people. FOR ALL RECREATIONAL flyers, DO NOT fly over people in a SUSTAINED manner ie, do not circle, hover or repeatedly fly back and forth over people. UNSUSTAINED flight over people and moving vehicles is probably ok. UNSUSTAINED is similar to what manned aircraft do. They just pass over you for split second when going from point A to point B.
 
That document explicitly says that you can use the AMA guidelines and/or the FAA guidelines. So yes - contrary to your post above they certainly have said what are currently acceptable options.
It says, “These or existing safety guidelines of another aeromodelling organization may be used for recreational operations, provided the guidelines do not conflict with the other statutory conditions of 49 U.S.C. § 44809(a).”

It may be a moot point though and I don’t want to get hung up on that because I don’t see any rules on the FAA’s guidelines that aren’t explicit statutory requirements of the law for operating under the limited exception for recreational operations... expect:

“9. Do not operate your drone in a dangerous manner. For example:
  1. Do not interfere with emergency response or law enforcement activities.
  2. Do not fly under the influence of drugs or alcohol”

But I think we can all agree that’s just common sense and implied in the law.

In other words, flying under the FAA guidelines doesn’t have additional restrictions than what is in the law. Unless the AC is no longer linking to the correct page and the FAAs guidelines are somewhere else.
 
In other words, regarding flying over people. FOR ALL RECREATIONAL flyers, DO NOT fly over people in a SUSTAINED manner ie, do not circle, hover or repeatedly fly back and forth over people. UNSUSTAINED flight over people and moving vehicles is probably ok. UNSUSTAINED is similar to what manned aircraft do. They just pass over you for split second when going from point A to point B.
Where do you get that from?

Edit: That came off the wrong way sorry. I just mean is that your interpretation or do you have a resource that says that?
 
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Where do you get that from?

Edit: That came off the wrong way sorry. I just mean is that your interpretation or do you have a resource that says that?
It's just my interpretation. Since there is no specificity regarding UNSUSTAINED recreational flight. If it's unsustained flight, I don't see a remarkably high safety risk or recklessness. It's all speculation at this point. Anyway, If someone were to pass over a person in under 1 second, how on earth can it be proven you flew directly over that person, in that less than one second time period. Who is to say you weren't or were directly over someone. It's confusing. In the end it's all about safety. If you crash into a person on the ground, then your really up s... creek.
 
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I was just practicing taking FAA tests and followed the study guide and passed these online Certifications: What do I do with them, or what are they for?
Part 107 Small UAS Recurrent
Part 107 Small UAS Initial- Part 61 Pilots

Is there any benefit to having these?

I attached the Certificate Cards
As a part 107 drone pilot you can now be compensated ( GET PAID ) for flying your drone.. the recreational pilot can not be compensated for flying the same as I can not charge anybody for flying them to say Florida as a private Pilot. I can only share the expenses with them. All of these rules are in the FAA FAR/AIM. If your have an Iphone/IPad you can download this book from the apple book store. I suggest anyone flying a drone pick up a copy, you don’t want THE MAN busting you for breaking any AIR space. I live right next to McGuire AFB with in their airspace I can’t even fly in my back yard with Authorization, which by the way is very easy with the DJI Go 4 app. I just click on the NFZ red bar at the top of the screen and answer the three questions, they text you an unlock code, enter it and I’m now ready to fly at home but limited to 100’

Congratulations!
 
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As a part 107 drone pilot you can now be compensated ( GET PAID ) for flying your drone.. the recreational pilot can not be compensated for flying the same as I can not charge anybody for flying them to say Florida as a private Pilot. I can only share the expenses with them. All of these rules are in the FAA FAR/AIM. If your have an Iphone/IPad you can download this book from the apple book store. I suggest anyone flying a drone pick up a copy, you don’t want THE MAN busting you for breaking any AIR space. I live right next to McGuire AFB with in their airspace I can’t even fly in my back yard with Authorization, which by the way is very easy with the DJI Go 4 app. I just click on the NFZ red bar at the top of the screen and answer the three questions, they text you an unlock code, enter it and I’m now ready to fly at home but limited to 100’

Congratulations!

You misread his post. He doesn't actually have the Part 107 certificate, he just took some of the training modules online. Those alone do not entitle OP to any of the Part 107 privileges.
 
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