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Have you experienced a Karen, male or female?

Was you kaaren Male Or female?


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I wonder if there's a correlation between narcissism and this kind of belief. Narcissists think it's always all about them, while in reality it;s usually not.

Most people here on the forum would go nuts if I let my drone hovering at 30-50m (clearly audible) above their house while I was taking pictures of the sunset. All would feel their privacy violated in that scenario, even when the camera wasn't even pointing at them. It's the natural reaction whenever you see a remotely controlled flying camera around, your brain is just not used to that scenario.

Whenever there's a drone flying nearby (specially if they are hovering) the natural reaction is to feel observed like someone was following you with a camera or peeping above the fence, that's why I always minimize hovering and static behavior.

It's just psychological, ofc a drone doesn't need to be static to record you and in fact, a drone won't be above or nearby if it wants to record you, it will be at 200m+ with the telephoto to avoid noise and visual detection.

Back when I was doing landscape/architecture photos with the tripod, it was already a magnet of idiots (people somehow don't realize you don't need a tripod to record them), but now with the drone is just at another level, that's why I always plan my flights at long range, else karens start to pop out around me.

So ask yourselves, what would you do if a drone stops near your house at 30m alt and just hovers around for 20 minutes?
 
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Most people here on the forum would go nuts if I let my drone hovering at 30-50m (clearly audible) above their house while I was taking pictures of the sunset. All would feel their privacy violated in that scenario, even when the camera wasn't even pointing at them. It's the natural reaction whenever you see a remotely controlled flying camera around, your brain is just not used to that scenario.
I agree. The neighbor that threatened to shoot my drone down was a good example. It was the maiden flight of my Mavic 3 and I wanted to test out the 28x zoom. I flew out of the Green Belt and dead center over his cul-du-sac at greater than 150 ft AGL, paused for about 40 seconds to gets some shots of Mount Rainier using the zoom feature. It was enough to get his attention and as I flew home (less than a block) he jumped in his truck and followed the drone.
Yelled his threats out of his truck window and took off before I could do any damage control. I took the threat serious enough to call and report it to the sheriff, who happened to be a Part 107 pilot himself.
However if there was a drone hovering above my house, I would want to know why and would feel the same initial alarm.
 
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Most people here on the forum would go nuts if I let my drone hovering at 30-50m (clearly audible) above their house while I was taking pictures of the sunset. All would feel their privacy violated in that scenario, even when the camera wasn't even pointing at them.ays plan my flights at long range, else karens start to pop out around me.

So ask yourselves, what would you do if a drone stops near your house at 30m alt and just hovers around for 20 minutes?
The comment I was referring to was about a couple walking in the park, I doubt it was near them for 20 minutes and if it was then they obviously had good reason to be suspicious. But if it was there and they happened to encounter it then I don't see why they would assume it was "out to get them". It's hearsay, and obviously depends heavily on the circumstances.
 
Things may be different in Mallorca
Oh yes, definitely.
Well, actually in 2023 I haven't had any confrontation, but I also flew much less with my mavic and more with my cinewhoop.
I guess people are getting used to drones as they are more common here now. Mostly, I have tourists complain because they don't know the local laws…
 
We proceeded to have an interesting conversation where they told me some drone cowboy was filming them as they were walking in the park, flying to within about 10 feet. Over the last few years, they reported four buzzing bandits who were operating within the park, flying illegally.

06BROAD-superJumbo.jpg


I couldn't resist 🤣
 
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So the easiest place for me to take pictures of a beautiful sunset might be standing on my neighbors front lawn. Setting aside issues of the law for the moment, and just addressing the social aspect, he may not like it. Maybe a lot.

The easiest place to get a shot usually isn't the only place. Almost always true with a drone, particularly for distant images.

So, always keep in mind accommodating others. Drones are intrusive to many. Remember, you can see what your camera's pointed at. They can't.

Don't go out to fly all ready to defend your rights. That's an attitude that encourages conflict. Instead, have an attitude of community and cooperation.

Sure, maybe you have a right to fly where and how you are, but do you need to? Can you make any changes to show you respect your fellow citizen's needs and still have fun, or complete a job?

With the status sUAVs have in our culture – speaking of the US – we're all ambassadors, and whether we like it or not are always tasked with PR.

Try to make friends, not enemies. It's a lot more fun anyway.
 
So the easiest place for me to take pictures of a beautiful sunset might be standing on my neighbors front lawn. Setting aside issues of the law for the moment, and just addressing the social aspect, he may not like it. Maybe a lot.

The easiest place to get a shot usually isn't the only place. Almost always true with a drone, particularly for distant images.

So, always keep in mind accommodating others. Drones are intrusive to many. Remember, you can see what your camera's pointed at. They can't.

Don't go out to fly all ready to defend your rights. That's an attitude that encourages conflict. Instead, have an attitude of community and cooperation.

Sure, maybe you have a right to fly where and how you are, but do you need to? Can you make any changes to show you respect your fellow citizen's needs and still have fun, or complete a job?

With the status sUAVs have in our culture – speaking of the US – we're all ambassadors, and whether we like it or not are always tasked with PR.

Try to make friends, not enemies. It's a lot more fun anyway.
In an ideal world maybe. But one still has to contend with folks like this:
 
In an ideal world maybe. But one still has to contend with folks like this:

Sure you can find all sorts of highly dramatic worst case evil people and horrible events on youtube. But, it's much more realistic to rely on your own observations and experiences in the real world.

How many other cases are there like that one? Even with hundreds of thousands of drones being flown, such incidents few and far between. It's highly unlikely that we'll have to "contend with folks like" that.
 
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So the easiest place for me to take pictures of a beautiful sunset might be standing on my neighbors front lawn. Setting aside issues of the law for the moment, and just addressing the social aspect, he may not like it. Maybe a lot.

The easiest place to get a shot usually isn't the only place. Almost always true with a drone, particularly for distant images.

So, always keep in mind accommodating others. Drones are intrusive to many. Remember, you can see what your camera's pointed at. They can't.

Don't go out to fly all ready to defend your rights. That's an attitude that encourages conflict. Instead, have an attitude of community and cooperation.

Sure, maybe you have a right to fly where and how you are, but do you need to? Can you make any changes to show you respect your fellow citizen's needs and still have fun, or complete a job?

With the status sUAVs have in our culture – speaking of the US – we're all ambassadors, and whether we like it or not are always tasked with PR.

Try to make friends, not enemies. It's a lot more fun anyway.

Amen. Very well said.

But, I'm expecting that you'll get some push back of the "It's my right" "and "stand my ground" kind.
 
Sure you can find all sorts of highly dramatic worst case evil people and horrible events on youtube. But, it's much more realistic to rely on your own observations and experiences in the real world.

How many other cases are there like that one? Even with hundreds of thousands of drones being flown, such incidents few and far between. It's highly unlikely that we'll have to "contend with folks like" that.
Until you are the one replying that "you thought it could only happen to other people" ...
 
  • Anyone who thinks it could only happen to other people is not being realistic.
  • Anyone who thinks it's probably going to happen to me today is not being realistic.
(The second statement can be nullified if they're behaving in a manner that invites complaint.)

Despite the sensational dramas on youtube, nasty drone confrontations are rare.
 
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But, I'm expecting that you'll get some push back of the "It's my right" "and "stand my ground" kind.

Generally in life, if you head in to a situation expecting to argue about your rights, guess what you usually get?

An argument about rights.

And almost always, the issue is never truly about rights.
 
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I don't believe so...and I also abhor basketball, so your drawing is baseless!

Since I was the one making the point, I believe I am best qualified to judge, and indeed you missed the point by a parsec, basketball not withstanding.

Regardless, never mind.
 
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Possibly, but the numbers could well be higher because many don't speak of them.

Yep, speculation can be used for creating a sense of danger when there's little or no actual evidence of a problem or threat.

The sky really might be falling, but no one is talking about it.
 
I've had many people, including cops, come over and watch and ask question and ask to see the screen, etc. The only "negative" experience I had was my fault. This was awhile back - I was flying over an ancient Indian Mound that happened to be in a state park. A ranger ran over* and told me, repeatedly, to land and stop. I was quite obviously already heading home to land, but he kept repeating himself. I told him I understood and would he please allow me to finish what I'm already doing. We waited and watched while I packed everything up and then informed me that you can't fly inside a state park. I complied without question. The only thing I said above my regular "inside voice" was that, after three times being ordered to land, that it was pretty obvious that I was in the process of doing just that... so let me do it. While I learned a new rule, he could have enforced it a bit more calmly. I have not flown in a state park since...

Point is, other than that, I've had no negative interactions while flying. I realize that ranger was doing his job and my only issue there was his attitude.

* You can see him in the video because I was still filming as I was returning to land.
 
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This thread should be locked, in my opinion, there is no more relevant info to be said.
Confrontations do happen, it's normal for a drone flyer at this point.
Perhaps, but it's interesting reading, don't you think?
 
The thread that never gets posted: "Still haven't been confronted and hassled yet!"

Think about it.

Cousin to the thread, "Haven't been carjacked yet... discuss"
Well, I have to say that, except for a state park ranger, I have had no negative interactions with people. And in spite of his attitude, the ranger was just doing his job.... I guess.
 
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