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Chapperz

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Ok so I looked but cannot find a definitive answer.

Are any of you professional photographers using lightroom super resolution in a professional context and getting professional results?

What I mean is, have you upscaled something like a 12mp image to something like 48mp and printed something like a A1/A2 print with professional/saleable results?

Thanks in advance
Regards
 
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No my cameras , not drone cameras , shoot at over 40 mgpixils and I have no need to upscale, however a pal has and is very pleased with the result but if memory is right he used I think Topaz , but not certain , cheers Len
 
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Big photos are seen from further distance than smaller photos, and your eye can't resolve anything at that distance, but MP/upscaling help for close inspection, though.

Based on my testing, the best results by far are obtained applying Lightroom enhance + the new lightroom IA noise reduction and then upscale in photoshop to the desired size.

Lightroom can't apply super resolution + IA noise reduction at the same time, at least for the moment, and superresolution quality is usually about the same if not worse than simply upscaling in photoshop.
 
Are any of you professional photograp hers using lightroom super resolution in a professional context and getting professional results?

What I mean is, have you upscaled something like a 12mp image to something like 48mp and printed something like a A1/A2 print with professional/saleable results?
Photoshop and Lightroom have been uprezing images for years. As a matter of fact, I have a JPEG made in 2000 that is only 640k and I've printed it to 24x30 where it looks **** good.
 
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Ok so I looked but cannot find a definitive answer.

Are any of you professional photographers using lightroom super resolution in a professional context and getting professional results?

What I mean is, have you upscaled something like a 12mp image to something like 48mp and printed something like a A1/A2 print with professional/saleable results?

Thanks in advance
Regards
Ok so I looked but cannot find a definitive answer.

Are any of you professional photographers using lightroom super resolution in a professional context and getting professional results?

What I mean is, have you upscaled something like a 12mp image to something like 48mp and printed something like a A1/A2 print with professional/saleable results?

Thanks in advance
Regards
Here's a step by step of how to use it in Lightroom. Once you are in the Develop module go to Photo in the menu and down to enhance to open the enhance module. Lightroom Super Resolution Explained (The Essential Guide)
It is going to double the pixels for your image, but if your image doesn't already look good, it's not going to make it look a lot better, remove noise, improve detail. For those kinds of enhancements you are much better off using Topaz Gigapixel. It's an ai application and while it doesn't work with everything, it has a lot of flexibility, how many times you'd like to blow up, what kind of photo you are enhancing, removing artifacts, deblurring, etc. I use it a lot for improving the resolution of archival images in documentaries I work on in post production.
 
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Big photos are seen from further distance than smaller photos
Depends.

I went to a Burtynsky exhibit with an amazing photo of a tropical reef. You could stand back and look at the panorama, or step close and admire the scales on the fish. All of his shots were like that: viewable from multiple distances.

Leaving aside the man's artistic abilities (which are incredible), I'm blown away by his technical abilities.
 
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Big photos are seen from further distance than smaller photos, and your eye can't resolve anything at that distance, but MP/upscaling help for close inspection, though.

Based on my testing, the best results by far are obtained applying Lightroom enhance + the new lightroom IA noise reduction and then upscale in photoshop to the desired size.

Lightroom can't apply super resolution + IA noise reduction at the same time, at least for the moment, and superresolution quality is usually about the same if not worse than simply upscaling in photoshop.
So I can just scale it up to whatever size I want, like a2 or a1 in photoshop and it'll sort it out?
 
So I can just scale it up to whatever size I want, like a2 or a1 in photoshop and it'll sort it out?

Use Lightroom enhance details with optionally IA denoise and then upscale it in Photoshop to the desired size, and you are basically good to go. When you are pixel peeping images, that's usually way larger than what you are going to print.

On large prints those extra steps (enhance and denoise) help, but ofc for web or for small print sizes all that is going to be lost.

I find myself quite comfortable with 20MP sensors, but 12 should be enough, my old 5D had 12MP and it was quite good. In general I find that around 20 is the compromise between image quality, file size and photoreceptor size.

On drones the Mavic 3 is what I'd recommend, the smaller sensors... are basically fighting with diffraction and the bigger drones are bulkier, and you won't fly them as easily.
 
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