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Wind Speed Relative To Drone Weight

LGLDSR73

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Greetings,

I am considering purchasing a DJI Mini Pro 3 but given it's <249g weight it begs the question if it's too light to handle the winds we have here in in Northern Michigan. While I've only been here a very short time the winds appear to consistently range from 10 - 20MPH with gusts to 30MPH. (On that note I notice that both speeds and weight are given in Metric only but am unsure why).

Would I not be better off starting with a heavier Drone for stability?

Thank you!

Lyman
 
Using the larger batteries for the Mini 3 Pro will help you because it increases the relative density of the drone (weight vs. frontal/side area. However, a larger drone would be better. I trust my M 2 Pro much more than my Mini 3 P in windy conditions.
The windy conditions should subside as summer approaches.
 
While I've only been here a very short time the winds appear to consistently range from 10 - 20MPH with gusts to 30MPH. (On that note I notice that both speeds and weight are given in Metric only but am unsure why).

Who not look at actual measured wind speed data for your location? The National Weather Service has those records for thousands of stations.

Consider when you'll be flying and under what conditions. Extreme wind conditions don't really matter, since you're not likely to be flying any drone in 30 mph gusts. If photography and videography are major interests, you'll probably be flying near sunrise and sunset, when winds are typically lighter.

Specs for DJI products are in metric units because China uses the metric system.
 
The weight of the drone isn't what matters.
The speed the drone can fly at is what's important.
Thanks for that input but I don't quite follow why speed would take priority. Can you please elaborate?
Thanks,
Lyman
 
Using the larger batteries for the Mini 3 Pro will help you because it increases the relative density of the drone (weight vs. frontal/side area. However, a larger drone would be better. I trust my M 2 Pro much more than my Mini 3 P in windy conditions.
The windy conditions should subside as summer approaches.
Many thanks! The M2 Pro is about double what I have budgeted for this. Very nice but pricey!
Best,
Lyman
 
Who not look at actual measured wind speed data for your location? The National Weather Service has those records for thousands of stations.

Consider when you'll be flying and under what conditions. Extreme wind conditions don't really matter, since you're not likely to be flying any drone in 30 mph gusts. If photography and videography are major interests, you'll probably be flying near sunrise and sunset, when winds are typically lighter.

Specs for DJI products are in metric units because China uses the metric system.
Thank you. Correct, it's unlikely I'd be flying in 30MPG gusts let alone something I'd even consider. Right now the winds are ENE @7MPH so it varies of course. Just something I'm going to have to keep an eye on.

Thanks for the clarification the why the Metric system is being used.

Again, thanks!

Lyman
 
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I agree with Meta4 on this one. I have a Mavic 3 and it is very stable in winds up to 25mph. Personally, I don't work in winds above 20 MPH; just too many things can go wrong.
Makes sense. Being wholly new at this there is going to be a learning curve and it's going to being on a calm day! :)

Best,

Lyman
 
Speed is a function of power-to-weight ratio, along with other things. A Mavic 3 with double the weight (mass) and the same power would have substantially less ability to overcome the effects of wind.

The drone flies through the air, no matter whether the air is still or moving. If the air is moving 30 mph over the ground, the drone will have to fly 30 mph to hold its position over the ground. More speed > more ability to fly against the wind. The heavier drone can't fly as fast, so it can't operate as well in wind.

The added mass of the heavier does result in greater inertia, so the heavier drone wouldn't bob around as much in response to turbulence and wind speed variations. But that's not going to get the drone home against a strong wind.
 
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Speed is a function of power-to-weight ratio, along with other things. A Mavic 3 with double the weight (mass) and the same power would have substantially less ability to overcome the effects of wind.

The drone flies through the air, no matter whether the air is still or moving. If the air is moving 30 mph over the ground, the drone will have to fly 30 mph to hold its position over the ground. More speed > more ability to fly against the wind. The heavier drone can't fly as fast, so it can't operate as well in wind.

The added mass of the heavier does result in greater inertia, so the heavier drone wouldn't bob around as much in response to turbulence and wind speed variations. But that's not going to get the drone home against a strong wind.
Gotcha. Well explained. Thanks!

Lyman
 
Thanks for that input but I don't quite follow why speed would take priority. Can you please elaborate?
It's quite simple
You asked is it "too light to handle the winds we have here".
If you are flying in strong winds, being heavy isn't what will bring your drone home,.
Two drones of different weight, but equal speed will have their speed over the ground reduced by the same amount (or be blown away just as easily) when fighting the same headwind.
Although the idea that heavier drones are better able to deal with windy conditions is popular, it's just a myth.
 
The word“heavier”may not be the best terminology. How about“bigger”.
I don’t have any technical information to provide, but my experience is the larger size aircraft along with the larger motors and props do handle more wind. Speed in a strong wind has not been a concern for the kind of flying I do so I can’t provide information on that aspect.
DJI, based on what reading I have done, is making a good amount of money on the word“Mini”.
 
It's quite simple
You asked is it "too light to handle the winds we have here".
If you are flying in strong winds, being heavy isn't what will bring your drone home,.
Two drones of different weight, but equal speed will have their speed over the ground reduced by the same amount (or be blown away just as easily) when fighting the same headwind.
Although the idea that heavier drones are better able to deal with windy conditions is popular, it's just a myth.
Thanks for the explanation, Meta4!
Lyman
 
The word“heavier”may not be the best terminology. How about“bigger”.
I don’t have any technical information to provide, but my experience is the larger size aircraft along with the larger motors and props do handle more wind. Speed in a strong wind has not been a concern for the kind of flying I do so I can’t provide information on that aspect.
DJI, based on what reading I have done, is making a good amount of money on the word“Mini”.
Thank you, Starz! Much appreciated!

Best,

Lyman
 
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